Jeph Jacques's comics discussion forums

Fun Stuff => CHATTER => Topic started by: gospel on 07 Oct 2008, 13:30

Title: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 07 Oct 2008, 13:30
At the expense of flames, I have yet to see a cooking thread; so, here one is.

I'll start with something easy. I usually hated baking, but I decided to give it a try.

Alton Brown: Southern Biscuits (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/southern-biscuits-recipe/index.html)
(Youtube Good Eats S1EP7 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3QuQSdjMVE))

(http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/7466/biscuitskp6.th.jpg) (http://img204.imageshack.us/my.php?image=biscuitskp6.jpg)(http://img204.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif) (http://g.imageshack.us/thpix.php)

These actually don't taste too bad. Certainly better than the pre-made stuff from the store. And, if I can figure it out anybody can. It works out fine with just regular all-purpose flour and not "biscuit" flour.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Drill King on 07 Oct 2008, 13:37
I think that's because there's one in the arts and crafts section isn't there? Or is that just baking?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: öde on 07 Oct 2008, 13:47
We had a cooking thread here a while ago, I'm sure the avid chefs will be here soon.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Social Bacon on 07 Oct 2008, 13:55
The thread in Arts and Crafts specifies baking in the name, but people post cooking as well.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 07 Oct 2008, 13:59
That thread seems to be predicated on your supplying photos of your cooking, though.  For instance, there would be no point in mentioning that I made a Quiche Lorraine for supper this evening, as I didn't photograph it (I ate  it, naturally).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 07 Oct 2008, 15:08
Oh yeah, another cooking thread. I'm always down. Be back later, I've got my free day tomorrow so i should have time to cook.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 10 Oct 2008, 21:08
Right, a double post to reveal my night of cooking! Me and my friend Matt:
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5827.jpg)


 decided to have an "easy cooked" meal, wherein we'd provide two dishes a piece. I made Orange BBQ shrimp and orange jell-o shots for dessert. He brought to the table "the easiest pasta dish ever" (pasta, bag of frozen veggies, chicken, microwaved. Actually turned out pretty good) and TGI Fridays fried green bean appetizers. He says its easy, I say its cheating, but they're delicious and so I couldn't complain.

Orange BBQ shrimp:
2 lbs of jumbo size shrimp
like, two cups of your favorite sweet bbq sauce
cup of orange juice, in this case fresh squeezed due to second recipe

put shrimp in zipper bag with orange juice and bbq sauce, slosh em around, let sit for a couple hours. Cook in big pan.

(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5809.jpg)
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5810.jpg)

Orange Jell-o shots

as per the easy to follow recipe on Food Network.com I think mine turned out pretty well. We used Clementines rather than a full sized orange for most of them, though we did make one bigger one as a test. Delicious vodka/citrus test it was.

(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5828.jpg)
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5829.jpg)
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5820.jpg)
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5836.jpg)

And I also stewed some tomatoes in the leftover sauce from the shrimp and put that on top of that and the pasta.

(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5819.jpg)
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5825.jpg)

TGI Fridays cheating:

(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5817.jpg)

And the finished meal:

(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5834.jpg)
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5835.jpg)

And leftover jell-o that we couldn't waste:
(http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y110/Wildkyn/100_5821.jpg)

Edit: Occurs to me that I forgot to post the link to the site: http://www.foodtv.ca/recipes/recipedetails.aspx?dishid=6412
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: yelley on 11 Oct 2008, 00:16
picture of green bean fries
oh man they sell those at the store? i hate t.g.i. fridays but those green bean fries they have there are amazing.

cooking... um.. i have some recipes. i make some pretty decent meatballs. and stuffed shells. and lasagna. if anyone is interested, i guess. jason likes them... i hope he's not just lying to me because he has to like them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 11 Oct 2008, 04:46
Tonight, to go with the left-over Russian lamb stew that I cooked last night, I made some mashed potatoes. Opening the fridge door to get some milk (because what's mashed potato without a bit of milk?), I noticed a jar of anchovies that I'd bought some time earlier, and I thought to myself: "Well, why not?"

Oh my god yes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: october1983 on 11 Oct 2008, 05:33
Oh shit, that sounds amazing. Oh shit.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 11 Oct 2008, 05:45
By that stage I had already put the garlic and the butter in the mashed potato.

Truly, tonight I ate the Mash of Kings.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 11 Oct 2008, 21:46
@Inlander:Ilvoeanchovies and mashed potatoes, but I'venever thought to mix them. I will try this soon.

I haven't cooked in a while. I think the last dish I made was chicken provencal with hericot verde almondine and sweet potato fries, about a week ago.  Everything turned out good, but I don't think the provencal and the hericot verde go particularlywell together.

Recipes forthose who might like to try:

Provencal topping
- 1 pint grape tomatoes
- 1 pint grape tomatoes, 1/2ed
- 1 cup nicoise olives,pitted and halved (kalamatas work nicely aswell)
- 1/4 cup garlic, minced
- 1/4 cup capers, drained and sauteed
- 1/2 tsp kosher salt
- 1 tsp cracked black pepper
- 1/2 cup olive oil

Mix all ingredients together until well-coated. Placeon sheetpan in 400F oven for approx 10 minutes, untilheated through. Serve over baked or grilled chicken breast.

Hericot verde almondine

- 1lb Hericot Verde (Or regulargreen beans in a pinch)
- 1lb Unslated butter, chopped into 1inpieces
- 1/2 cup heavy cream
- juice from 1lemon
- 8oz Chardonnay
- 1 sachet (2tsp black peppercorns and 1 bay leaf tied up in cheesecloth)
- 1/2 cup crushed almonds, blanched and toasted

Blanch the hericot verde until bright green, approx 45sec to 1 min, and shock in ice bath.

Place chardonnay and sachet in a saucepan, and reduce over medium high heat until almost dry. Turn heat to low, and slowly add raw butter, whisking constantly. Once all butterhas been added, remove from heat, and remove sachet. Add cream and lemon juice, as well as the almonds.  Serve over blanched hericot verde.

Sweet Potato fries.

Slice as many sweet potatoes as needed (1/2 per person roughly) into 1/4inch thick rounds, and blanch in boiling water for 3-4 minutes, or until mostly soft.  Dry, and place on sheetpan in 350F oven for approx 7-10 minutes, or until cooked through. I like to season mine with Thyme-infused olive oil and sea salt when done.

Cooking is fun!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: CarrionMan on 11 Oct 2008, 22:32
I was wondering if anyone knew an easy way to make around… 108 breakfast burritos in an hour. They'll contain scrambled eggs, bacon, and potatoes(minus some because of vegans, egg people, etc.), and some herbs and spices. Is there any way to really make this easy?


I need them for the UCLA band day next Saturday.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 11 Oct 2008, 23:40
Well, your ingredients are pretty simple. The best way to do it is to get a couple friends, and assembly line it. find out how many of each you need. I think the most complicated part of your problem is time and the amount.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 12 Oct 2008, 03:03
I was wondering if anyone knew an easy way to make around… 108 breakfast burritos in an hour. They'll contain scrambled eggs, bacon, and potatoes(minus some because of vegans, egg people, etc.), and some herbs and spices. Is there any way to really make this easy?


I need them for the UCLA band day next Saturday.

scramble a hell of a lot of eggs, cook a lot of bacon and potatoes, Mix them all together, and just keep spooning them onto tortillas and folding till you reach 108.

what would be in a breakfast burrito for a vegan?  Just a tortilla and potatoes?  I say just pick up some oranges or something for them.  If your doing this out of the goodness of your heart, no sense trying to please absolutely everybody.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 12 Oct 2008, 15:26
I'm seeing a chef.

He wants me to cook for him.

What do I do?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 12 Oct 2008, 16:45
My favorite part of the orange jello shots, is this quote from the recipe page.

Quote
REMEMBER, YOU ARE SERVING SOLID BOOZE.

hahahah
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 12 Oct 2008, 16:50
I'm seeing a chef.

He wants me to cook for him.

What do I do?
I don't think he expects you to be as good as he is :P

Depending on your skill level, http://foodnetwork.com has easy to difficult recipes.

Though, I made this baked artichoke w/ lemon and garlic (http://www.cookhot.com/cooking-recipes)l for dinner tonight. It turned out fantastic, and was really easy. You could also make nice, quarter-cuts of mushrooms too (covered) and steamed. I find steak seasoning goes really well on mushrooms. If you want, you can slice up some onion and green peppers to go with the mushrooms. Just season with salt/pepper/garlic/Italian or Steak seasoning, cover, heat for about 40-45m at 350 (same as the artichoke). 

If he's more into meat, make him steak =P

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 12 Oct 2008, 19:32
I have some chicken stew going in my crockpot right now

ingredients
-6 chicken breasts
-2 cans of cream of chicken soup
-1 onion
-3 potatoes

I stuck all that in the crock pot and poured in enough chicken broth to cover. Put it on low for 5 hours before I added corn and cheese tortellini, and then cooked it on low for another 2 hours.

What you end up with is a really hearty creamy chicken soup. Its great warm dinner for a colder day.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 12 Oct 2008, 20:11
Carrots would be a good addition to that, as would some simple dumplings, flour, water salt and pepper, made to a thick doughy consistency and bam, chicken and dumpling stew.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: octodexy on 13 Oct 2008, 00:04
I am required to make six loaves of soda bread. I don't even know where I can purchase buttermilk at. I called the grocery store, and they didn't know what buttermilk was. I'm also struggling to find a soda bread recipe from a source other than my gramma that doesn't sound like it will be heavy like a stone. Goodness.

I'm sure none of you make soda bread often, if ever, but I'm wondering if I can substitute a cup of whole wheat flour with a cup of cornmeal.

I've heard of substituting buttermilk with plain yogurt, but that just seems bizarre to me.

Also, a good way to cook scrambled eggs in a short period of time is to put them into a ziplock bag around squish them up, and boil them in a pot. Then when they're done cooking, let the water cool, and they'll stay warm in the bags in the water. You grab a bag and put as many eggs as you need on there. I'm sure you can put like a dozen or more eggs in gallon ziplock bags, easily, with no problems. I've only ever done it with two eggs, though. That only takes like a few minutes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 13 Oct 2008, 04:39
Boro,

how thick exactly? should it be liquidy but hard to mix? or more solid, kind of like pizza dough before you make it?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Patatat on 13 Oct 2008, 07:14
I just kind of usually throw a bunch of stuff together and hope that it turns out good. Most of the time it does and if it doesn't I can usually fix it. Everytime I try to stick to ingredients it never works out. I always get distracted and I am a complete spice nut. I have to spice and sauce the shit out of everything.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Oct 2008, 08:06
You can make a buttermilk substitute with milk and I think lemon juice. Or was it vinegar? I will look it up after I get out of bed. Also, where ARE you that the grocer doesn't know what buttermilk is? Not the South, clearly.

Edit: Okay, I'm up. According to the More with Less cookbook, you can make buttermilk from dry milk powder, but on looking up the recipe it is really telling you how to stretch commercial buttermilk. A better bet is this, from the back cover:

To substitute for 1 c. sour milk, use 1 c. buttermilk OR 1 c. yogurt OR 1 and 1/3 T. vinegar or lemon juice plus milk to make 1 c.

I think that last option is the one my grandmother used to do when she ran out of buttermilk for baking.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 13 Oct 2008, 08:28
I think its an emulsion of cream, milk, and an acid (probably lemon juice).  This will make a buttermilk flavored substitute, but it probably will not have any of the cooking properties of real buttermilk.  Most likely it will have a different reaction to baking soda and powder.

I think you can actually make a better buttermilk substitute with sour cream and milk/ half and half.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Oct 2008, 11:13
Boro,

how thick exactly? should it be liquidy but hard to mix? or more solid, kind of like pizza dough before you make it?

More like pizza dough, once you've gotten it to that either tear, cut up or roll the dough into balls (I sorta make lumpy noodlelike stuff outta mine) and drop it in the soup to cook, which it will. Though if you're worried you can boil them in water first.

Also I lied, you also need a couple teaspoons baking powder, and you can use butter and milk instead of water if you want, though my grandmother and Mom's opinions differ on which is better. I've actually found a copy of the recipe, so I can actually give you some measurements, still really easy though!

2 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons butter
3/4 cup milk, or 3/4 water, or 1/2 of either depending on if you want them a bit more doughy
Pepper and other flavorings to taste if you want to get fancy, though they'll really get flavored by the chicken stew just fine. Combine all the ingredients and mix until the above consistency.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Oct 2008, 12:56
I have settled on a salad. Main course and dessert to be announced later.

A bed of young arugula (called "rocket" in Oz and possibly Britain), topped with grilled baby zucchini, halved cherry tomatoes, goat cheese, pine nuts, and served with some kind of mild vinaigrette. Maybe baby cucumbers, too, if they have them at the store.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: öde on 13 Oct 2008, 14:55
Yep, it's called rocket here.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scandanavian War Machine on 13 Oct 2008, 16:46
-The Breakfast Wad-

STEP 1: fry one flour/corn tortilla (personal preference) in a pan with butter (not oil!), periodically coating the top with honey, suger, and cinnamon then flipping it over. rinse, repeat until both sides have a nice, sugery coating.

STEP B (to be done simultaneously with step 1 for most delicious results): fry or poach an egg

STEP 2: wrap tortilla around egg so that it resembles a 'wad'

STEP 3: consume.



i'm pretty sure i've posted this before in past cooking threads but it's the only thing i know how to make, and it's tastey.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Oct 2008, 17:10
Damn, that sounds good. You can post that as often as you want. I might just re-post it right now, just for kicks. Hell yeah.


-The Breakfast Wad-

STEP 1: fry one flour/corn tortilla (personal preference) in a pan with butter (not oil!), periodically coating the top with honey, suger, and cinnamon then flipping it over. rinse, repeat until both sides have a nice, sugery coating.

STEP B (to be done simultaneously with step 1 for most delicious results): fry or poach an egg

STEP 2: wrap tortilla around egg so that it resembles a 'wad'

STEP 3: consume.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 13 Oct 2008, 18:22
Man, stuffing chicken breast is a pain. You can't stuff it before it cooks or the things being stuffed get over done, but it doesn't want to move correctly after being cooked. I think I'll just continue with the cutting a slot into the chicken.

But seriously, Pesto and Feta stuffed chicken sounds really great to me. I will make it happen.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Oct 2008, 19:23
Maybe stuff a half-cooked chicken? I don't know, I've never tried it. And yeah, you've totally posted that before, and I still haven't tried it. Mainly because eggs and cinnamon don't sound like all that great an idea to me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 13 Oct 2008, 19:50
how bout cutting the slot in the chicken before you fry/cook/bake it. once its done, put the stuffing the in the slot and then broil for about 5-10 minutes to finish it off.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Oct 2008, 19:52
Or how about freezing the stuffing things first so they take longer to cook?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Oct 2008, 20:14
That would add a lot of extra water that may or may not help.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 13 Oct 2008, 20:27
I cut it before hand and the cut sort of seals, hm..  more experimentation is needed.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Oct 2008, 20:29
Delicious experimentation!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Oct 2008, 20:30
Hm. I wouldn't think it would add water. Unless you mix the ingredients with water before you freeze them, I don't see why it would add any more water than using them unfrozen.

Also, I just modified the "egg wad" recipe. I used pasta instead of a tortilla. Cooked the pasta, moved it to a plate, put an egg in the hot water, put butter, sugar and cinnamon on the pasta, let the butter melt, then added the poached egg on top. It was pretty yummy.

I need to get my quart of honey; I keep forgetting to pick it up when I see my friend Mike. He accidentally ended up with six.

Edit OH! What if you cut the chicken beforehand and HELD IT OPEN somehow? Like with a piece of cedar plank, like you use for grilling? Or stick a whole egg in there; you can make egg salad later.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 13 Oct 2008, 20:33
Quote
Edit OH! What if you cut the chicken beforehand and HELD IT OPEN somehow? Like with a piece of cedar plank, like you use for grilling?

THIS is golden.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Oct 2008, 20:36
Well, what it would do is suck some of the moisture out of the filling itself and leave it on the outside, potentially actually drying the filler and making the chicken itself watery. Though if it's only been frozen for a short time this wouldn't be too bad. I wish I knew what Alton Brown would say.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Oct 2008, 20:36
He would say what any scientist would say:

EXPERIMENT!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Oct 2008, 20:44
Actually found a recipe of his for stuffed pork chops (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/stuffed-grilled-pork-chops-recipe/index.html).

I think the trick is high heat. yeah, normally that has the potential of leaving the middle uncooked or undercooked but in this case the center will cook faster anyway so you want the outside to have a race with the inside. At least, that's what I think his reasoning is for grilling on high, since pork chops and chicken both are usually supposed to be cooked well done (though the chances for salmonella and other disease is pretty remote and I don't always cook up till charred by any stretch of the imagination). Also, to prevent the inside from falling out and to seal against that heat getting in too early I know some people will use soaked toothpicks, shish kebab sticks or dowel rods to hold the sides together. But like I said I have little to no experience on this matter so it's all conjecture.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 13 Oct 2008, 21:51
I've found the best way to stuff chicken breast is to use a narrow blade to slice into the rounded end of the breast at it's thickest point. Work it inside a bit to make a pocket,but be careful to not cut all theway through the breast.  Then, place your filling in a pastry bag with a tip and pipe it in. If it still has problems, you could try sewing the pocket closed or skewering it shut with a toothpick.

If the pocket is properly sealed, you shouldn't have any problems with the filling cooking faster than the chicken.

Also, I'd just like to point out that it is safe to eat pork at medium temperatures (140+).  Since pigs aren'tslopped anymore, there's no real danger of trichinosis.  Commercially-raised chickens, however, basically all have salmonella.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 14 Oct 2008, 02:21
Quote
Then, place your filling in a pastry bag with a tip and pipe it in.

Oh, I like that. Feta might be a bit chunky though, but that will certainly help.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 14 Oct 2008, 12:59
You can always grate it or throw it in a robot coupe for a minute. It'll lose some of it's texture, but it becomes much easier to pipe.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 14 Oct 2008, 14:17
So this past weekend was Canadian Thanksgiving and I thought I'd share my absolute favourite family recipe. It's really not difficult and it's freaking delicious. We call it smash. I don't know, it's been a staple at Thanksgiving and Christmas since...always.

1 medium turnip
5-7 large carrots
4 tbsp butter
Salt/Pepper to taste

Just cube the vegetables and boil. When they're cooked, mash them together with the butter, salt and pepper. It's a really tasty, brightly coloured dish that looks great and goes perfectly with turkey and potatoes!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 14 Oct 2008, 15:04
You can add swede as well.  It is particularly good when eaten in a friend (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord_Torphichen)'s Scottish castle alongside haggis, with a good whisky on the side.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 14 Oct 2008, 15:06
Mmm, the time honored tradition of mashing roots into a delicious substance that is granpa's dentures friendly. I've recently found a love for sweet potatoes myself,  and they're really easy to mash, you don't even have to boil them, just pan-fry/steam em for long enough until they're soft, with the salt/pepper/butter thingy, and they are good to go.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 14 Oct 2008, 16:52
I'm sort of surprised any grocery wouldn't know what buttermilk is. And, yes, you can simply put lemon juice or vinegar in 2% milk and let it fester for 15m.

I am also jealous of your slow cooker ;/.

(http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/4710/pankozf3.th.jpg) (http://img235.imageshack.us/my.php?image=pankozf3.jpg)(http://img235.imageshack.us/images/thpix.gif) (http://g.imageshack.us/thpix.php)
I had to figure something to do with the giant ass turkey I got (buying in bulk more these days). So, after spending the pain-in-ass time to carve the meat from it, I decided to play with panko crumbs which I had never done before. I have to say I think I enjoy panko crumbs for turkey or even chicken better than Italian mixes. It's nice and light and goes well with some Parmesan cheese/olive oil/fresh parsley. Arugula was a simple olive oil/lemon juice/pepper mix.

(http://img407.imageshack.us/img407/9003/egrolldvm9.th.jpg) (http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=egrolldvm9.jpg)
Also, Korean dumplings, mandu, from the other night. Video Recipe (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zECZXmDmHR0) by Maangchi. Korean food hits the comfort spot, but god it's a pain in the ass to make. Heh, and yeah, my mom talks exactly like she does in that video.

Downloaded seasons 1-11 of Good Eats. Alton is making me really wish I had a bigger kitchen and whatever "smoked" cumin is.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 14 Oct 2008, 17:50
Quote
Downloaded seasons 1-11 of Good Eats. Alton is making me really wish I had a bigger kitchen and whatever "smoked" cumin is.

Whoo, me too. And not to mention Grains of Paradise.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 14 Oct 2008, 18:29
Hmm... I've got smoked paprika. It's pretty popular in Spanish cooking. They wood-smoke the herb before grinding, so I'd imagine the same would be done with smoked cumin.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: octodexy on 14 Oct 2008, 19:28
I live in Las Vegas. I know what Buttermilk is, so I imagine that most other people from here would know what it is... The reason I called ahead is, because I've been to two grocers, and they didn't have any buttermilk. On the shelf or listed. I think it just depends on how they stock their dairy section, I guess. However it's likely that the person I spoke to on the phone didn't know what I was talking about. Either way, I appreciate all everyone's help, and if I just can't find buttermilk, I can make my own.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 14 Oct 2008, 21:11
Quote
Downloaded seasons 1-11 of Good Eats. Alton is making me really wish I had a bigger kitchen and whatever "smoked" cumin is.

Whoo, me too. And not to mention Grains of Paradise.

Any time you need a strange spice or want to play around with "molecular gastronomy"(fucking hate that name, it doesn't describe it) then go to http://le-sanctuaire.com/

I check it daily, amazing site.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 14 Oct 2008, 22:31
Hmm... I've got smoked paprika. It's pretty popular in Spanish cooking. They wood-smoke the herb before grinding, so I'd imagine the same would be done with smoked cumin.
Hmm. I love paprika (which I'm convinced is 80% of the colonel's special recipe). What sort of dishes do you use the smoked version for, or is it heavily ethnic stuff?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 14 Oct 2008, 22:38
I know it definitely goes well with fish and lamb, but as for traditional Spanish dishes I'll have to ask my housemate. I most frequently use it for making spiced chickpeas (basically you bake chickpeas with a bit of olive oil until they're crunchy and then roll them in your own spice-mix. It's kind've like a morrocan substitute for potato chips or something, I guess, and it's awesome)

The flavour is really quite strong, so you don't need very much of it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 14 Oct 2008, 23:53
I put some hot paprika and some nutmeg in a chocolate milkshake I was making the other day.

It was super-delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Oct 2008, 00:54
I'm sure none of you make soda bread often, if ever, but I'm wondering if I can substitute a cup of whole wheat flour with a cup of cornmeal.
Not really. With soda bread you may be able to get away with it, but meal is not flour and corn is not wheat. Try it as an experiment but it is not a safe thing, and you'll probably need to add extra flour to get the right texture, like replace a cup of whole wheat with a cup of corn meal plus a quarter to a half cup of whole wheat.
That said, I know most of what I know because I tried substitutions, so actually, go for it. See what happens.

I've heard of substituting buttermilk with plain yogurt, but that just seems bizarre to me.
This is actually what I'd recommend. Buttermilk is a cultured (like, bacterial culture) milk. You can add lime juice or vinegar to milk for a substitute; it'll curdle a bit for the thicker texture and sour a bit for the sour flavour, but it's a weak approximation. Yogurt is closer to real buttermilk since it's cultured and thick and sour. Kefir could probably work if you can get your hands on some, but odds are against that if you can't find buttermilk. Try a health food store?
Yogurt is actually a key component of my standard bread recipe.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 15 Oct 2008, 07:45
I'm reading "A Cocking Thread?" whenever I pass by the link. This happening to anybody else?

Anyway, I really would like to learn how to cook. Thing is, I always thought if I learned how to cook as opposed to go out all the time, I'll save myself money. But it hasn't necessarily been the case. I find that I spend about the same amount, usually slightly less, for more portions of a dish that isn't quite as good as one I could go out and buy from someone whose job it is to get it right. Maybe I'm not going about it the right way. Maybe my tastes are too narrow. I'd love to be able to cook italian food. Chinese as well. At this point all I've mastered is a pretty good (and actually very, very cheap) vegetarian chili.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 15 Oct 2008, 09:05
I'm reading "A Cocking Thread?" whenever I pass by the link. This happening to anybody else?

Anyway, I really would like to learn how to cook. Thing is, I always thought if I learned how to cook as opposed to go out all the time, I'll save myself money. But it hasn't necessarily been the case. I find that I spend about the same amount, usually slightly less, for more portions of a dish that isn't quite as good as one I could go out and buy from someone whose job it is to get it right. Maybe I'm not going about it the right way. Maybe my tastes are too narrow. I'd love to be able to cook italian food. Chinese as well. At this point all I've mastered is a pretty good (and actually very, very cheap) vegetarian chili.
It's only really cheaper if you buy in bulk and freeze (especially meats). Cooking is, no doubt, a luxury compared to the cheaper alternatives of eating out. It's really about learning something because you want to and because the stuff cooked outside is generally really unhealthy. Eating healthy, even out, is usually expensive too. 

I'm not sure where you live, but the tax out here is about 10% + eating-out charge. It's literally $6-7+ to eat at McDonalds.

[e] And, I'm not sure QC allows "cocking" threads. >.>
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 15 Oct 2008, 16:41
Cooking is usually cheaper once you're buying larger quantities and cooking for three or four people (or alternatively, freezing or refrigerating the food you make). I agree that if you cook for one meal, it usually isn't that much cheaper than eating out. Also, if you've only just started cooking, it takes a while to get a good stockpile of spices and herbs that make it cheaper for the next time you need 'em.

My girlfriend made a salad with fried haloumi, roast pumpkin, pine nuts, and rocket last night. It was sooooo good. Man, I love haloumi.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Oct 2008, 18:49
It's only really cheaper if you buy in bulk and freeze (especially meats). Cooking is, no doubt, a luxury compared to the cheaper alternatives of eating out. It's really about learning something because you want to and because the stuff cooked outside is generally really unhealthy. Eating healthy, even out, is usually expensive too. 

I do not agree with you. I do not think cooking is a luxury compared to eating out. $6 a meal times two and a half meals a day seven days a week is $105. I can make two sandwiches for maybe three bucks. Frozen juice is dirt cheap. Pork chops, rice, and carrot sticks is a dead simple meal and that's under $6 a head. I spend $50-$60 a week on groceries eating light breakfasts and good suppers.
I don't think your point about buying in bulk and freezing is valid either. I mean, yes, if you buy a weeks worth of groceries in a go, you should freeze the meat you're not eating that day. That's common sense. Buying a pack of four chicken breasts and eating them one or two at a time is hardly buying bulk.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 15 Oct 2008, 19:11
I'm seeing a chef.

He wants me to cook for him.

What do I do?

Bacon hotdogs.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 15 Oct 2008, 19:23
Does anyone have an idea for a quick breakfast I can grab and take to class?  Particularly something with a high amount of protein and requires almost no preparation time.  I have 8 am classes Monday through Friday, and I rarely wake up earlier than an hour before class.

What I usually do is make a variant of Swedish hardtack/crisp bread that my mom taught me.  It’s incredibly simple, fast, and is tender rather than crisp.  I'll typically make a batch once a week and store it in a large zip lock bag.



The original recipe that my mom taught me was as follows:

preheat oven to 425° F


Knead mixture into a dough, making sure everything is evenly incorporated.  Roll thin to about the thickness of a graham cracker.  Prick with the tines of a fork all over, flip mass over and prick all over again.  Cut into 5 x 3 pieces, and place on a lightly greased baking pan.  Bake for 8 - 10 minutes.
This forms a thin tender cracker that will keep for a long time if stored properly. 


I used to grab about 2 - 3 of these and a cup of coffee before class, and they do a pretty good job as a quick breakfast or snack while studying.  They are also good if you toast them and spread cream cheese or honey on them.

I usually use whole wheat flour instead due to a higher protein content (actually dark rye flour generally about the same protein content as whole wheat, but I hate dark rye), and use butter instead of vegetable oil. I also like to add a teaspoon of vanilla extract and some brown sugar.  This is about the most basic recipe ever so it’s very easy to alter. I tried mixing in some almond meal once also, which was harder to knead and made a crumbly end product, but tasted pretty good.  I've never tried this, but my mom told me that if you knead crushed ice into the dough and cook at a lower temperature for significantly longer, you will get a crispy wafer like product.  Like traditional crisp bread.

After having this for breakfast every weekday for nearly 2 years I've started to get tired of it.  Additionally, being a bread product, they don't have the protein content I want unless I spread something on them.  I was wondering if anyone had an idea for an easy breakfast I could use.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 15 Oct 2008, 19:31
Do you have a blender? If so, dump some frozen fruit, whey protein, and milk or yogurt into it, pour it into a glass, fill the blender with water so it won't be so hard to clean up later, and drink your smoothie on the way to class.

I should start doing that again. I used to do it every day, and it was great.


I also find hardboiled eggs to be pretty quick. Cover an egg with water and turn the stove on while you shower. By the time you're ready, so is your egg. Run cold water on it until you can handle it, peel it and take a bite. Add a dash of hot sauce and finish it up. I usually have a glass of milk with my egg.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 15 Oct 2008, 19:35
I do have a blender, and I do make shakes like that occasionally.  However I prefer to eat my breakfast instead of drink it.  I think hard boiled eggs are also quick, and I sometimes make them when I get tired of hardtack, but its hardly the class friendly food.  They leave shell fragments everywhere, and I don't eat the yolk which smells if left out to long.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 15 Oct 2008, 20:33
you dont *gasp* eat the yolk?!? But that's...that's the b-best p-p-p-part....
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Oct 2008, 20:36
I used to start boiling some eggs before I start doing my dishes after supper, then peel them that night and store them in the fridge in a plastic container. Avoids the shell problem, but not your yolk smell problem.

For a while when I worked an office job, I would make my lunch the night before since I'd never want to make it in the morning, the sleep in and not have time for breakfast, then eat my sandwiches for breakfast and go out for lunch. Which is just to say a cold-cut sandwich is not that bad for breakfast, especially if you toast it when you make it and then microwave it at school if you can.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: yelley on 15 Oct 2008, 22:22
you dont *gasp* eat the yolk?!? But that's...that's the b-best p-p-p-part....

i find the yolk to white ratio to be too high, so when eating hardboiled eggs i usually only eat maybe a third of the yolk of each one. same goes when i make egg salad... most of the yolk just gets thrown out.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 15 Oct 2008, 22:30
I agree, there just to much yolk.  I don't like its texture when hard boiled.  Plus a single egg yolk can contain two-thirds of the recommended daily recommended value of cholesterol.  That is just too much.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 15 Oct 2008, 22:57
Hummus is good at any time of day. Or night. Red Pepper Hummus and pita.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 16 Oct 2008, 01:08
It's only really cheaper if you buy in bulk and freeze (especially meats). Cooking is, no doubt, a luxury compared to the cheaper alternatives of eating out. It's really about learning something because you want to and because the stuff cooked outside is generally really unhealthy. Eating healthy, even out, is usually expensive too. 

I do not agree with you. I do not think cooking is a luxury compared to eating out. $6 a meal times two and a half meals a day seven days a week is $105. I can make two sandwiches for maybe three bucks. Frozen juice is dirt cheap. Pork chops, rice, and carrot sticks is a dead simple meal and that's under $6 a head. I spend $50-$60 a week on groceries eating light breakfasts and good suppers.
I don't think your point about buying in bulk and freezing is valid either. I mean, yes, if you buy a weeks worth of groceries in a go, you should freeze the meat you're not eating that day. That's common sense. Buying a pack of four chicken breasts and eating them one or two at a time is hardly buying bulk.
This is true. I fail to consider I usually don't eat breakfast beyond some toast and maybe an egg and lunch is usually a sandwich. For some reason cooking was stuck in dinner mode in my head. But, actually looking at the math, you're absolutely right.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 16 Oct 2008, 13:32
On Tuesday I made lemon pepper chicken with garlic green beans and potatoes with peppers and onions.  It was good, really simple comfort food.

Then I just finished making chicken stuffed organic bell peppers.  I really enjoyed that because I made it really southwestern style.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 16 Oct 2008, 15:17
Thanks, now I miss my short trip to Arizona and New Mexico.

WTB authentic SW cooking recipes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scandanavian War Machine on 16 Oct 2008, 15:27
Do you have a blender? If so, dump some frozen fruit, whey protein, and milk or yogurt into it, pour it into a glass, fill the blender with water so it won't be so hard to clean up later, and drink your smoothie on the way to class.

I should start doing that again. I used to do it every day, and it was great.

this, plus a couple Psilocybe cubensis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psilocybe_cubensis), and you've got yourself a psychedelic breakfast on the go!

hmmm  :-D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 17 Oct 2008, 18:25
Best soup I've ever made:
Saute until translucent in 2 T olive oil: 1 onion, 6 cloves garlic
Add 1 tetrapak chicken broth, 3 potatoes peeled & diced, and 2 medium butternut squash. Simmer for 45 min. Use an immersion blender until soup is smooth. Add 5 T butter and 1 c. Fat free sour cream. Top with cheddar cheese.
Yum yum. It's good as soup or served over vermicelli.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 18 Oct 2008, 05:08
I am interested in this business of squash in soup. There seems very little else to do with squash, sometimes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 18 Oct 2008, 05:56
Speaking of soups, tonight I successfully made a recipe idea I've been thinking about for a while now: chilled tomato soup with ginger. The ingredients were:

- Tomatoes (peeled, chopped)
- Fresh ginger (grated)
- Carrot (diced)
- Salt (a pinch)
- Water (just a dash, to thin out the soup as desired)
- Fenugreek (ground)
- Olive oil (just a little)
- Fresh coriander leaves (chopped).

Use whatever quantities you think you'll need. In a saucepan, heat the olive oil and cook the carrot in it. Then add the tomatoes, salt, ginger, and fenugreek, and the water if necessary, put the lid on the saucepan and cook over a medium heat until - well, until it's cooked. Until the tomatoes are mushy. Transfer the mixture from the saucepan into a container of some kind - a metal bowl is good. Let it cool, then put it in a blender and blend it until it's smooth. Return it to the metal bowl, then put it in the freezer until it's chilled. Serve, garnished with the coriander.

This was a really, really delicious soup.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 18 Oct 2008, 16:49
I've always been wary of chilled soups, for some reason it just feels wrong for it to be anything other than piping hot when you eat it. Though I think there's been a couple times when I've had a savory cold soup and enjoyed it, can't remember what kind it was though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 18 Oct 2008, 17:26
They're good when the day is already piping hot: you need to eat something for dinner, but you don't want something too filling and you don't want something hot.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 18 Oct 2008, 22:09
Are we bragging about accomplishments? I just made croissant. Pretty great. As soon as butter's on sale again I'll buy a whole bunch and make croissant to freeze.
Next time I will not botch it up by rushing the turns, and I'll let them rise more.
Having the power of croissant at my disposal is intoxicating.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 19 Oct 2008, 02:14
Next you need to master the brioche.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 19 Oct 2008, 10:45
Particularly in this economic climate, yes (http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/227600.html).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 19 Oct 2008, 15:31
Cooked for the chef today.

So the meal I ended up making was brunch. I made omelets (with cheddar, baby zucchini, sauteed onions and ham), baked grits, and shredded potatoes. I meant to make bacon but I forgot to get it out of the freezer last night. The potatoes were a little wetter than I would have liked, but they tasted fine. He put hot sauce on everything, complimented and thanked me for it all, and went back for seconds on the grits.

Later in the day we had a late lunch/early supper of takeout sushi, which we took to a park and ate at picnic tables while dodging bees.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 19 Oct 2008, 19:41
Today I can into an assortment of raw and roasted chicken bones and meat, and I decided to make a chicken stock.  I have about a gallon and a half of chicken stock on the stove, its been simmering for 2 hours so far.  I was wondering if anyone had a good recipe for stew I could make.  I'm looking for something that's easy to cook in a dorm kitchen, and can feed four people.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 19 Oct 2008, 19:49
Oh, man, just add some vegetables. That sounds so delicious already.

Carrots, onions, celery, turnips, potatoes, cabbage...anything you like, really. Maybe throw a half-cup of raw rice in there, or a handful of pasta noodles, and keep simmering it until you like the texture of everything in it.

I am jealous of your chicken stock.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jhocking on 19 Oct 2008, 19:52
Hey guys, would you consider the terms "rare," "medium," and "well-done" to be descriptions of temperature? tommy just confused me in another thread.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 19 Oct 2008, 19:53
Technically, they refer to color, but color is directly correlated to temperature.

I read that, and I think Tommy was trying to be funny.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 19 Oct 2008, 19:54
Do you have access to a crock pot?

Toss in 4 chicken breasts, carrots, onion, celery, potatoes, rice, and then cover it with the stock. After a few hours you can shred the chicken with a fork and you'll end up with a pretty solid chicken and rice soup.


and yes. rare, medium and well-done refer to the temperature in the center of the meat.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperature_(meat)

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 19 Oct 2008, 19:55
Yes, it refers to color, but the chef/cook isn't going to cut into a steak to see its color which is why they use a meat thermometer to judge doneness
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 19 Oct 2008, 19:55
Oh, man, just add some vegetables. That sounds so delicious already.

Carrots, onions, celery, turnips, potatoes, cabbage...anything you like, really. Maybe throw a half-cup of raw rice in there, or a handful of pasta noodles, and keep simmering it until you like the texture of everything in it.

I am jealous of your chicken stock.

Actually, its about 9:00 pm right now so I am not planning on cooking tonight.  I'm making the stock ahead of time and either freezing it or storing it in the fridge.  I don't know how well chicken stock freezes, my cookbook and mom say that as long as its in several containers it should be fine.  I am actually going to freeze it in a couple ice cube trays, and storing them.  I'll probably use most of it in a stew or soup, but any extra stock cubes could be just added to a sauce or something for some quick flavor.

Do you have access to a crock pot?

Toss in 4 chicken breasts, carrots, onion, celery, potatoes, rice, and then cover it with the stock. After a few hours you can shred the chicken with a fork and you'll end up with a pretty solid chicken and rice soup.

My roommate has a crock pot.  How do you think it would taste if included some diced tomatoes or a can of tomato paste into the stew?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 19 Oct 2008, 19:57
It freezes great; your cookbook and mom are right.

I like to freeze soup in ziplock bags, actually.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 19 Oct 2008, 20:09
I don't know. I've never tossed tomatoes in mine. I've been aching for some tomato soup though. I don't think experimenting would hurt.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 19 Oct 2008, 20:29
I think I know what I am going to do.  I found a recipe on the food network here (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/chicken-stew-recipe/index.html).  I'll have to substitute the chicken broth for the stock I made (I prefer chicken stock anyway), and I would probably add more than a tablespoon of tomato paste.  Also, I was surprised this contained no garlic, so I would defiantly add a couple cloves.  It sounds like something everyone here would like.

Quote from: Food Network - Giada De Laurentiis

Chicken Stew (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/giada-de-laurentiis/chicken-stew-recipe/index.html)
Recipe courtesy Giada De Laurentiis

Cook Time: 35 minutes
Yield: 4 - 6 servings

Ingredients:

    [0] 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 stalks celery, cut into bite-size pieces
  • [0] 1 carrot, peeled, cut into bite-size pieces
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • [0] Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 (14 1/2-ounce) can chopped tomatoes
  • [0] 1 (14-ounce) can low-salt chicken broth
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves, torn into pieces
  • [0] 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 1 bay leaf
  • [0] 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 2 chicken breast with ribs (about 1 1/2 pounds total)
  • [0] 1 (15-ounce) can organic kidney beans, drained (rinsed if not organic)
   

Directions

Heat the oil in a heavy 5 1/2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the celery, carrot, and onion. Saute the vegetables until the onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Stir in the tomatoes with their juices, chicken broth, basil, tomato paste, bay leaf, and thyme. Add the chicken breasts; press to submerge.

Bring the cooking liquid to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer gently uncovered until the chicken is almost cooked through, turning the chicken breasts over and stirring the mixture occasionally, about 25 minutes. Using tongs, transfer the chicken breasts to a work surface and cool for 5 minutes. Discard the bay leaf. Add the kidney beans to the pot and simmer until the liquid has reduced into a stew consistency, about 10 minutes.

Discard the skin and bones from the chicken breasts. Shred or cut the chicken into bite- size pieces. Return the chicken meat to the stew. Bring the stew just to a simmer. Season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Ladle the stew into serving bowls and serve with the bread.

Serving suggestion: crusty bread


Anyone have any additions they think would go well with this?

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 19 Oct 2008, 20:40
Does that recipe have a name?

And a grilled cheese + bacon sandwich would go great with that
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 19 Oct 2008, 22:02
I never tried making cookies besides out of a tube, since I adamantly despise baking. I gave my crack at some pumpkin cookies (http://lafujimama.blogspot.com/2008/10/truth-or-dare-pumpkin-chocolate-chip.html). The recipe was a lot softer of a cookie than I had ever had before--almost like a cake. Many people will be have diabetes forced upon them tomorrow.
(http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/9501/cookiefuckup2jt1.jpg)
(http://img528.imageshack.us/img528/6859/cookiefuckup3fo1.jpg)


And, now I want soup. Thanks jackasses!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 20 Oct 2008, 02:38
Hey guys, would you consider the terms "rare," "medium," and "well-done" to be descriptions of temperature? tommy just confused me in another thread.

Rareness is (lack of) doneness.  Meat that hasn't been cooked to as high a temperature will be less done, so rarer. 

However, even a rare steak needs to be done on the outside to seal the juices in, and to give a contrast in taste; and the way to get the outside done but leave the inside rare is to cook at a higher temperature for a shorter time. 

If the steak is a good bit of fillet, I like mine Bleu, please - in France I have had them query the order on the basis that (a) I couldn't possibly know what I was going to get, and (b) no Englishman could possibly want that anyway.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: october1983 on 20 Oct 2008, 11:41
Man adds anchovies to mashed potatoes, wins Nobel prize

So, I tried this today and fuck yes, that is amazing. You are a genius. My anchovies also came in a garlic and herb oil and so it was incredible. I guess my only concern is what to serve it with. It kind of overpowered the breaded lemon sole I cooked tonight. How was it with the stew?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 20 Oct 2008, 11:52
I'm afraid of anchovies, so I can't see how that's such a good idea.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 20 Oct 2008, 12:32
Don't click here. (http://viatraveldesign.com/journal/archives/anchovies.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 20 Oct 2008, 12:36
As in eating them. I admit they aren't much to look at either, but I'm not going to run screaming from the room by a big ol' pile o' an-choh-veez.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 20 Oct 2008, 13:58
Hey guys, would you consider the terms "rare," "medium," and "well-done" to be descriptions of temperature? tommy just confused me in another thread.

Rareness is (lack of) doneness.  Meat that hasn't been cooked to as high a temperature will be less done, so rarer. 

However, even a rare steak needs to be done on the outside to seal the juices in, and to give a contrast in taste; and the way to get the outside done but leave the inside rare is to cook at a higher temperature for a shorter time. 

If the steak is a good bit of fillet, I like mine Bleu, please - in France I have had them query the order on the basis that (a) I couldn't possibly know what I was going to get, and (b) no Englishman could possibly want that anyway.
I had to quote this because it's a huge pet peeve of mine.  You can not, I repeat CAN NOT, seal in the juices of meat.  Searing a piece of meat is just for flavor.

I had chefs in culinary school telling us that and I would just get annoyed.  Then finally I had one chef who straightened everyone out and people were really thrown off guard.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 20 Oct 2008, 16:01
Then why is it tender and juicy when you sear it? Because only the outside gets really done?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 20 Oct 2008, 16:14
It kind of overpowered the breaded lemon sole I cooked tonight. How was it with the stew?

Perfect. I'll post the stew recipe after I've had a shower & breakfast.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 20 Oct 2008, 17:02
My friend came by last night and brought me five tiny cabbages that her granddad grew.

I bought a quart of ham broth at the butcher on my way home from work tonight, and cut up one of the cabbages, a carrot, and two garlic cloves. I also added salt since they don't pre-salt theirs.

Honestly, it was pretty disappointing soup. It kind of smelled like sweaty ass. Cardinal Fang suggests that the taste was changed by the SPAM Lite and eggs I ate while waiting for it to cook, and while I agree that it may have tasted better if I had been hungrier, I think it was just not very good soup.

Any ideas for the other 4 tiny cabbages?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 20 Oct 2008, 17:04
cole slaw. sauerkraut. cabbage rolls. corned beef and cabbage.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 20 Oct 2008, 17:08
Then why is it tender and juicy when you sear it? Because only the outside gets really done?
It can do that without searing it.  But you can't sear in the juices because you can't get anything hot enough.  Searing it doesn't really affect how juicy or tender it is.  It is possible that it seems juicier due to the better flavor causing your mouth to water making the meat seem juicier?

But everything i have seen has shown that seared meat loses more weight than a cooked and unseared piece.

edit- Sorry if i sound dickish, that is not what I meant.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 20 Oct 2008, 17:10
ooh, stuffed cabbage! I'll make fish and rice tomorrow, with cole slaw. Then I'll make stuffed cabbage on Wednesday night. YAY! Thanks, Phil!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 20 Oct 2008, 17:12
Also (http://www.cheriestihler.com/CC/recipes.html),
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 20 Oct 2008, 17:26
So here's the lamb stew recipe, as promised. This is called Chakhokhbili and is originally a Georgian recipe, apparently, and I got it from the book the Food and Cooking of Russia, by Lesley Chamberlain.

- 500g (1lb) lamb, cubed
- 400g (12oz) onions
- salt
- black pepper
- 500g (1lb) tomatoes
- 1tbsp each fresh parsley, thyme, coriander and basil
- 1/2 tbsp fresh dill, mint and tarragon
- 1tsp cayenne pepper
- 1/2-1 head of garlic

Fry the meat without additional oil or fat in a heavy-bottomed pan for 10 minutes, stirring to prevent it sticking, then add the chopped onions, cook for a further 5 minutes and season lightly. Skin the tomatoes and cook until soft in a separate pan. Put the meat and tomatoes together and cook for another 15 minutes, covered. Add the fresh herbs and red pepper and cook over a gentle heat for another 5 minutes. Add the finely chopped garlic, replace the lid and allow the stew to stand for 5 minutes before serving.

Simple and delicious - especially with anchovy mash!!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 20:58
As in eating them. I admit they aren't much to look at either, but I'm not going to run screaming from the room by a big ol' pile o' an-choh-veez.

No no no. Anchovies are awesome! You've just listened to too much bad press. They add a little tang and salt to a salad, or any num,ber of otehr dishes. They suck on pizza, but there are a zillion good uses for anchovies. Almost any tomatoe sauce will be greatly improved by them. Anythign you can imagine a green olive in a n anchovie will probably work with. If you want the salt out just soak em in some cold water for a while. And if you cook them for a little while, they dissolved and you never know they were even there.

My favorite use it to soak em an to get the salt out, let em dry overnight on a napkin in a plastic baggy, and then shred them into a sald. Goood Shiiiit!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 20 Oct 2008, 21:11
They suck on pizza

That's crazy-talk! For a superb pizza, just add:

- anchovies
- prosciutto (or really good quality ham if you want a less salty pizza)
- mushrooms
- pepper

Plus the tomato base and cheese on top, of course.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 21:13
All right, I'll give you the anchovies if you soak the salt out of them and crush them up a bit. But only if you'll throw some sun dried tomatoes and pesto on there as well. Then maybe we can talk. Oh, and some green olives and soem of those big fat calamatas.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 20 Oct 2008, 21:14
No, any more than four toppings and it's getting too complicated. Simple pizzas are the best pizzas.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 20 Oct 2008, 21:14
Best pizza ever = onions, and bacon or onions and pesto sauce, and maybe chicken.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 20 Oct 2008, 21:15
Big fat calamatas? Calamatas are the amazingly delicious kind of skinny ones. And salt is the whole POINT of anchovies.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 21:29
No, any more than four toppings and it's getting too complicated. Simple pizzas are the best pizzas.

There is one simple pizza that is allowed in the world of Guido. Pepperoni by the slice, NY style. Any other pizza should be packed with crap I like to eat and which encourages the hardening of my already stiff arteries. If, after eating a slice of really good pizza, I don't feel my head spinning from the salt sucking all of the moisture out of my blood, I do not consider it pizza.

Four toppings is like...like...like a pair of panties with nothing in them. Or one of those Victoria Secret catalogs: Nice idea but who gives a shit?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 20 Oct 2008, 21:39
Why ruin a pizza with a bunch of shit? Given the choice between an overloaded pizza and a cheese pizza, I'd choose cheese.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 21:52
Big fat calamatas? Calamatas are the amazingly delicious kind of skinny ones. And salt is the whole POINT of anchovies.

No way! They're much better if you soak em for a bit to suck some of the salt out. And the little calamatas are kind of a waste. THere being a variety of sizes and even tastes, I go for the big ones that aren't very salty and still nice and plump. You can sort of squish them apart and drop them in a Salad and against the flavor of some good anchovies, some sliced red onion and crumbled feta shaken up with a bit of ceasar dressing, well, I will go far out of my way for a salad like that :-D

Quote
Quote from: Emaline on October 20, 2008, 11:14:44 PM
Best pizza ever = onions, and bacon or onions and pesto sauce, and maybe chicken.

bleck. I can tell our minds will never meet on the subject of pizza. You might as well dumnp a gallon of barbeque sauce on it and grill it Sad

And the point pf a pizza with a bunch of shit is that it has...a bunch of shit Smiley we're not talking about high class here. We're just talking about a pile of my favorite foods jammed onto a rolled up slice of pizza dough, and baked until it's all crispy and sort of stuck together by all the grease Smiley
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 20 Oct 2008, 22:00
I think it's more that if you have a lot of different toppings on there then the flavours all mingle together and overpower anything. If you have a small amount of toppings on there you can have more subtle flavours on there without them being lost. At least that is what I go by when I make pizzas, I normally have chicken, sundried tomato and pineapple; maybe onion or ham (depending on what i have in the fridge). It's not the classiest pizza out there, but I prefer simple ones like that than supreme-type pizzas, where there are so many different things on there that half the stuff falls off when I try and eat it.

I give anchovies to my cat. She seems to like them more than I do.

(Oh, also double posting probably isn't a good idea, it would be better if you just edit your posts)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 20 Oct 2008, 22:01
so essentially guido you actually hate pizza, yourself and everybody

is that what you are trying to say
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 22:14
so essentially guido you actually hate pizza, yourself and everybody

is that what you are trying to say

Hmmm. I'm not sure where I said that? Did I say that? I love pizza. (make up your own mind about the rest, if you like)

Eris, I apologize for the DP's. I didn't realize I was actually doing it. Like I said earlier, for me there are two classic pizzas: everything I can shove onto one slice of very thin pizza dough, and pepperoni. Eveything else I sort of skim over when I look at a menu. I have had some great pizza in Croatia, of all places, and Italian Pizza is out of this world simply for the fresh cheese. I'd eat shoe leather over there and like it :p

I suppose I can agree with you about the foursome idea of toppings, but if I wanted a heavenly combination of minimalist ingredients I would make myself a bolonese, neh?

I guess that's kind of sad for a guy who worked as a soux in New Orleans aten't it?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 20 Oct 2008, 22:26
You saying you love pizza is similar to someone saying they love steak and then drowning it in A1.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 20 Oct 2008, 22:35
Or someone who says they love sex when really they mean they love drowning hookers.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 20 Oct 2008, 22:44
You're supposed to kill the hooker when you are done with them.  Every knows that.

Also, today I made some awesome roasted salsa and some guacamole.  Tomorrow I plan on making some mexican rice and some braised pork.  Add queso and put into a tortilla and game over.

Also I was thinking about my last meal on earth and it would be this dish a a local authentic mexican restaurant here that is chicken cut into small strips and cooked with chorizo then topped with queso and served with the only mexican rice i have ever liked from a restaurant.  they bring you a few hot tortillas to eat with them.  Seriously, it is amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 22:47
You saying you love pizza is similar to someone saying they love steak and then drowning it in A1.
Not a bit. I have said that there are two ways I love pizza: Peperoni, or gobs of stuff rolled up and dripping all over my shirt.  I enjoy both equally, but only eat my deathza once in a while...because I might as well be eating a can of lard. That YOU don't like it doens't mean it isn't a perfectly valid way to kill oneself. :|

As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.


Dovey, you keep making these generally agressive, sweeping insults in a tone that suggests you'd caught me bouncing you mother off the headboard...I can only assume you've decided you're in love with me and want to impress me.   :laugh:

I don't drown my hookers. I stuff them with a mix of sausage and onions, and grill them. Why waste good meat?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 20 Oct 2008, 22:50
I like a true italian pizza as much as i like the bastardized american version.  But i think more than a few toppings and you are just raping your pizza.

I'm not sure, it tastes less musty so i am assuming there is little to no cumin in there, then it's not the yellow you normally see so they probably leave off turmeric.  I can't figure out what they do to make it so good, and I have seriously studied it trying to figure out.  My restaurant spanish isn't good enough to ask them either.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 20 Oct 2008, 22:51

the only mexican rice i have ever liked from a restaurant
I am in the same boat--restaraunt mexican rice is nasty. What do they do differently?
I am in Mississippi of all places and had a bowl of mexican chicken soup here that made me want to marry the cook. She had a mustache and at least ten kidsso it was a no go, but daaaamn!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 20 Oct 2008, 22:59
As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.

I don't know what kind of butter you use.  But it shouldn't caramelize seeing as butter typically contains no sugars.

Speaking of butter, what is a good compound butter that I could serve on top of steak?  My roommate's dad owns a butcher shop so he can get some nice porterhouses pretty cheaply.  I was thinking about cooking some of there Bistecca alla Fiorentina style (High heat, the only preparation for the meat would be drizzling it with olive oil, salt and pepper).  I was thinking about a compound butter flavored with sea salt, pepper, garlic paste, and rosemary.  My mom suggested adding a dash of red wine in with it as well.  What would be a good wine to add to the butter, and ultimately drink with dinner?  I am not so educated in the wine and food pairing department.

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 21 Oct 2008, 02:39
Dovey, you keep making these generally agressive, sweeping insults in a tone that suggests you'd caught me bouncing you mother off the headboard...I can only assume you've decided you're in love with me and want to impress me.

I choose to be personally offended by people who have horrible taste in pizza. It's my "thing"

Usually it's people who insist on putting pineapple on, so I'm always happy when I get a curveball.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 21 Oct 2008, 06:15
In regards to steak rarity: 125F is Rare, 135 is Medium Rare, 145 Medium, 155 Medium Well, and 160+ is Well.  No one wants to eat a piece of meat with holesin it, so most chefs do not use a meat thermometer. It is possible to get a fairly accurate temperature by feeling the firmness of the meat.

Hold your hand open and relaxed, palm upwards. Lightly touch the tip ofyour index finger and the tip of your thumb together. Now, feel the mound at the base of your thumb. That is what a rare steak should feel like. To get differing degrees of doneness, simply progress one finger over for each degree.  For well done, apply some pressure with your pinky and thumb, to tighten the mound.

I also agree with abadname regarding "sealing in juices."  The purpose of searing a piece of meat is to caramelize the sugars present in it, making it more visually appealing, offering a contrasting texture to the preferably rare center, and enhancing the flavor.

As far as a good compound butter, you could try Buerre Poivre.  Over high heat, reduce 8oz full-bodied red wine, with 1 clove garlic,  2 shallots, and  3-4oz  cracked black peppercorns.  When about 1oz of wine is left, remove from heat, strain thewine reduction out, and fold it into 8oz softened butter.  If you happen to have any veal stock, I would advocate adding 8oz stock, reducing by half, and then adding 2oz of raw butter off of heat in lieu of folding the wine into the butter, but Veal bones are surprisingly hardto come by, at least here in Atlanta.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 21 Oct 2008, 06:24
Usually it's people who insist on putting pineapple on, so I'm always happy when I get a curveball.

One of my favorite "pizzas" has pineapple on it! Sweet bbq sauce (either brown sugar or honey based) instead of your standard tomato based pizza sauce, bacon, onions and pineapple. All relatively strong flavors, but none cancel each other out. I used to not like bacon and onions together on pizza but now I find it to be one of my favorite combinations.

Also, pepperoni isn't complete without black olives and mushrooms, and another good trio is goat cheese, sundried tomatoes and spicy italian sausage. I'm also of the opinion that you shouldn't stack too many toppings on a single pizza, go with three or four choices that go well together, cut out the other unnecessary stuff. Though I will go for a meat lover's monstrocity or veggie supreme every now and then.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: supersheep on 21 Oct 2008, 06:27
Foodstuffs that can go fuck themselves - olives and sun-dried tomatoes. All of the other foods are tasty. All of them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 21 Oct 2008, 08:37
(http://bilder.tykjpelk.net/skitch/21102008131-20081021-173838.png)
10 minutes later
(http://bilder.tykjpelk.net/skitch/21102008135-20081021-173805.png)

Successful cooking!

But, uhm, the real reason I'm posting: What are your favourite and/or easiest things to pack for lunch? I'm trying to eat more regularly, but it's difficult when at school due to 10-15 minute breaks and stuff, so there's no time to go buy food (plus I am dirt poor). Crispy bread with stuff on it is good for breakfast, but they get soggy and gross after a few hours, and regular bread with topping (aka "open faced sandwiches", apparently) always gets a little bit dry, and are always sort of a let-down.. Salads are great, but they take too long to make :/ Suggestions, anyone?

Also, recipe suggestion that is made from pure win: Chicken fillet and garlic flavoured cream cheese cooked in aluminium foil, seasoned with oregano and a couple of other things. So good, and super easy to make!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 21 Oct 2008, 09:28
Foodstuffs that can go fuck themselves - olives and sun-dried tomatoes. All of the other foods are tasty. All of them.

Okay, I agree that sun dried tomatoes aren't good in all contexts, but they're not bad for some things. And olives are delicious! how dare ye!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 21 Oct 2008, 11:06
As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.

I don't know what kind of butter you use.  But it shouldn't caramelize seeing as butter typically contains no sugars.

Speaking of butter, what is a good compound butter that I could serve on top of steak?  My roommate's dad owns a butcher shop so he can get some nice porterhouses pretty cheaply.  I was thinking about cooking some of there Bistecca alla Fiorentina style (High heat, the only preparation for the meat would be drizzling it with olive oil, salt and pepper).  I was thinking about a compound butter flavored with sea salt, pepper, garlic paste, and rosemary.  My mom suggested adding a dash of red wine in with it as well.  What would be a good wine to add to the butter, and ultimately drink with dinner?  I am not so educated in the wine and food pairing department.

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.

I'm not sure where you learned to cook but I grew up in New Orleans. I worked at Commander's Palace and Antione's as a kid. When one uses the term caramelize in cooking (there anyway) it is generally intended to mean more than sugar caramel. When fat burns or frizzles, it is described as caramelized. Butter that has turned brown is described as caramelized. I'm sure you know what you are talking about, but when Paul Prudhomme and Ruy Guste teach me to use a term, I'll stick with it over some guy on the internet, neh?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 21 Oct 2008, 11:09
When sundried tomatoes are utilized correctly they are a little piece of heaven.

edit- And the term carmelized just means the color of the product, bread, meat, and butter are called caramelized when they are really just the effects of maillard reactions.  And guido, i know that you probably know a lot about cooking and you worked with some chefs who are good at what they do, but you get an elitist attitude sometimes man.

Also interesting fact, tabasco sauce has more acetic acid than white vinegar.  Vinegar is nearly pure acetic acid too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Peet on 21 Oct 2008, 11:19
I made my first butter sauce tonight, to have over salmon and couscous and garlic mushrooms. It is a pretty great thing. The idea seems to be "butter is pretty tasty huh" "yes why not melt it and dribble it on things".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 21 Oct 2008, 12:18
When sundried tomatoes are utilized correctly they are a little piece of heaven.

edit- And the term carmelized just means the color of the product, bread, meat, and butter are called caramelized when they are really just the effects of maillard reactions.  And guido, i know that you probably know a lot about cooking and you worked with some chefs who are good at what they do, but you get an elitist attitude sometimes man.

Also interesting fact, tabasco sauce has more acetic acid than white vinegar.  Vinegar is nearly pure acetic acid too.

Actually I don't know a lot about cooking any more. It's been twenty + years since I did it for a liiving. It's not eletist Abad, it's just permenantly grumpy  :-o Although admitedly the two can be hard to tell apart :) I'm a lot older than most of the posters in here , I think, and I get irritated when someone tries to correct me when I've been doing it for thirty years. I was a soldier for twenty years, and when someone tries to explain to me how to judge wind spead and distance I can't help but want to flick their ear,. Sorry I'm a dick, guys, I try... I'll try harder from now on.

Mexican rice--I never boterhed to learn anything about it because I always thought it was kind of gross. So I looked up recipes. This one seems about the sanest and doesn't make it all restaraunt nasty imo.

Quote
Mexican Rice 1 teaspoon olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup uncooked long grain rice 1 cup water
10 ounces diced tomatoes and green chilies -- (1 can) undrained
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; sauté 4 minutes. Add rice, water, and tomatoes; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until the liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat; stir in cilantro. Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 cup).


It reminds me more of the dirty rice I grew up with. speaking of which:
Quote
DIRTY RICE   

2 tbsp. bacon drippings
1/2 lb. lean ground beef
1/2 lb. lean ground pork
1 c. chopped onion
1/4 c. chopped fresh parsley
1/4 c. chopped green onions
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup bell pepper finely chopped
1 lb. chicken giblets, boiled & chopped
4 c. giblet stock
1 tbsp. minced garlic
8 c. cooked rice
2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
Salt to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste

In a large deep saucepan over medium heat, saute the ground beef and pork in the bacon drippings until crumbly. Add the bell pepper, onions, celery, parsley and green onion. Cook until onion are clear. Stir in the chopped giblets, stock, garlic, rice, and Worcestershire sauce. Add salt and hot sauce. Then mix together well everything.
Cook, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook 1 hour. Leftover Dirty Rice can be eaten with eggs for breakfast.

Makes 10 servings or enough to stuff 1 large hen or 8 to 10 bell peppers.

I stole this off the net because I'm lazy but it's a pretty generic recipe. Wonder if I should start an actual recipe thread...
 
I know tons of old cajun stuff...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 21 Oct 2008, 13:00
You can also add spices like cumin and chili powder into the rice, at least that what our family has always done. Also instead of a can of diced green chilies and tomatoes we usually go for stewed tomatoes and a chipotle pepper.

And post your recipes on this thread! That way its a thread about recipes and cooking stories and cooking advice and tips, though I guess we could cut out some of the nonconstructive criticism of certain ingredients a little...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 21 Oct 2008, 13:31
If you have a problem with tiny little fish, I suggest you watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxB5XuuNy1I

And, that lamb stew looks awesome. Never really at lamb outside of gyros growing up >.>
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 21 Oct 2008, 13:32
Technically caramelization is for sugar only. I personally would not use the term for anything that didn't involve browning sugar, but as always, words take on new meanings and language is fluid and I'm not going to argue someone's interpretation of language in a specific field.

-pizza
-question

That is a great looking pizza!

For lunches I usually just cook a double-dose of dinner the night before and pack half of it. Usually depends on you having a microwave handy, though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 21 Oct 2008, 13:47
Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.

Topical examination of internet recipes say it's a go. This (http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/recipes/anchovy-and-red-wine-butter-438286.html) looks pretty tasty.
I would assume, though, that you don't want to add the wine hot, so as to avoid actually melting the butter, I think you just want to process it?

EDIT: By it's a go I mean it's a go to reduce the wine before hand.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 21 Oct 2008, 14:12
That is a great looking pizza!

For lunches I usually just cook a double-dose of dinner the night before and pack half of it. Usually depends on you having a microwave handy, though.
It is an awesome pizza! It's so good, it took several months before I even gave any thought to the fact that there is no meat on it, which used to be a prerequisite for a pizza to be any good in my opinion.

Also, I do the dinner thing sometimes, when the dinner tastes acceptable cold. But now that you mention it, there is a microwave available a couple of places at school near where I am at lunch time a few days a week, and I always have leftovers in the refrigerator, because cooking for one is a bitch, so it's actually a great idea for food that requires heat as well. Thanks!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 21 Oct 2008, 14:28
As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.

I don't know what kind of butter you use.  But it shouldn't caramelize seeing as butter typically contains no sugars.

Speaking of butter, what is a good compound butter that I could serve on top of steak?  My roommate's dad owns a butcher shop so he can get some nice porterhouses pretty cheaply.  I was thinking about cooking some of there Bistecca alla Fiorentina style (High heat, the only preparation for the meat would be drizzling it with olive oil, salt and pepper).  I was thinking about a compound butter flavored with sea salt, pepper, garlic paste, and rosemary.  My mom suggested adding a dash of red wine in with it as well.  What would be a good wine to add to the butter, and ultimately drink with dinner?  I am not so educated in the wine and food pairing department.

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.
I haven't used any butter compound on steak, but I usually just use the unsalted butter (soft obviously). To my understanding, it doesn't make a huge difference.

And, yeah, you want to reduce the sauce + whatever other shallots/etc. Cool it on top of an ice bowl and mix until it is cold when you touch it. Remove from ice and mix with butter, salt, pepper, etc.

As far as wine goes, something red.

EDIT: I guess Rachel Ray (heh) says you can just cook the butter in the pan and throw it in the fridge. ( http://www.rachaelraymag.com/recipes/beef-pork-lamb-recipes/panfried-steak-with-red-wine-butter/article.html ). Your call.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 21 Oct 2008, 15:10
She adds some to cook the shallots then adds more once the mixture has cooled to make it a compound butter.  It's a little different.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 21 Oct 2008, 19:55
Rachel Ray also says you can 8-piece a raw chicken on a cutting board, flip the board over to cut potatoes,and no harm done.

She also says EVOO.

I'm not sure which i worse.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 21 Oct 2008, 20:00
I thought you were OK to use the same cutting board if the stuff is going in the same place. Like if you're cutting meat and veggies on the same board, its ok if they're going into the same stir fry?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 21 Oct 2008, 20:06
I always heard that you can cut up veggies first and then meat on the same board, but the other way around is not good.

Although I don't know why that would be...wouldn't cooking kill the salmonella or trichinosis or whatever it is you're worried about, in theory?

Paging Yelley to this thread with her mad food microbiologist skillz.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 21 Oct 2008, 20:13
Depends on how you're cooking it, like how hot, how long for, etc.

(also you can get gastroenteritis from vegetables as well because they use copious amounts of manure as fertiliser)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 21 Oct 2008, 20:24
It depends.  To reliably kill salmonella, you need to hit 165F for 15 seconds.  If you were simply trimming the ends off some green beans before blanching, they could potentially be contaminated, and wouldn't reach the 165F mark.  Would they be safe to eat?

Probably

As someone who has had salmonella before, probably is not good enough for me.  Salmonella is a shitty disease.

The basic heirarchy is Ready to eat food > raw vegetables > whole muscle or steak beef > pork and ground beef > fish > poultry.

Something higher on the list won't contaminate something lower on the list.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 21 Oct 2008, 20:28
Yeah i usually clean my board or get a new one when i switch between meat and veggies.  It's not worth getting sick over doing a couple more dishes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 21 Oct 2008, 20:34
Add raw eggs at the end of that list, also. Dishes that use uncooked egg (eg. mouse, mayonnaise) are one of the more dangerous types of food as far as Salmonella enteritidis goes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 22 Oct 2008, 06:38
It depends.  To reliably kill salmonella, you need to hit 165F for 15 seconds.  If you were simply trimming the ends off some green beans before blanching, they could potentially be contaminated, and wouldn't reach the 165F mark.  Would they be safe to eat?

Probably

As someone who has had salmonella before, probably is not good enough for me.  Salmonella is a shitty disease.

The basic heirarchy is Ready to eat food > raw vegetables > whole muscle or steak beef > pork and ground beef > fish > poultry.

Something higher on the list won't contaminate something lower on the list.
I am pretty sure fish is higher up on that list because I know you have to cook it the lowest.  The way I was always taught the temps to cook food is the farther from the ground the higher the temp.  So fish, pork, beef, ground beef/pork, poultry(you have to pretend all birds fly for this.).  But maybe i am wrong.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 22 Oct 2008, 10:07
Rule of thumb: Raw meat is like inviting the skank to the orgy--everybody walks away infected.

I usually use a tephlon-ish cutting board for meat and a wood board for vegetables/etc anyways.

And yeah, that flip n' cut thing is horrifying.

Speaking of Rachel Ray, here's her show covering (ironically) germs in on your purse.  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRRAuUMXkq4)

Add raw eggs at the end of that list, also. Dishes that use uncooked egg (eg. mouse, mayonnaise) are one of the more dangerous types of food as far as Salmonella enteritidis goes.
Eh, I dunno. The raw egg thing is sorta overrated. I mean it's literally 1/1000 chance. According to the FDA you're not even supposed ot have over-easy or Cesar salads.  Hell, Rocky drank raw eggs! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EYZCZvV7WM)



EDIT: Did you know the average toilet is cleaner than the average kitchen?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MayuWDsSGL4
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 22 Oct 2008, 17:58
1/1000 is pretty high, actually.

Last night I manipulated my housemate into cooking chilli con carne with baked potatoes and corn bread!

It was a good meal. I had never had corn bread before, and I like it!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 22 Oct 2008, 20:57
there is only one real recipe for cornbread. I defy you all to contradict me.

*defies all*

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 22 Oct 2008, 21:03
It's kind of hard to argue with you if you're not going to share the recipe. I mean, I only know one recipe for cornbread, but how the hell am I supposed to know if it's the one you're talking about or not?

Incidentally, it was delicious fresh out of the oven (like all bread), but not so flash after that. But then I'm not the biggest corn fan.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 22 Oct 2008, 21:06
allrecipes.com has 167 results for cornbread.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 22 Oct 2008, 21:49
It's kind of hard to argue with you if you're not going to share the recipe. I mean, I only know one recipe for cornbread, but how the hell am I supposed to know if it's the one you're talking about or not?

Incidentally, it was delicious fresh out of the oven (like all bread), but not so flash after that. But then I'm not the biggest corn fan.

But where would the fun be if I gave away the recipe?

There are seriously many many great recipes(167 according to allrecipes.com. The most important parts imo:  Uses a cast iron skillet to make it. Put oil in the skillet, put the skillet in the oven, preheat skillet and oil. Mix your batter and when your oil is hot ONLY THEN do you add the oil. I have no idea why this is important but my mother made me learn it and when I don't it comes out crappy. If it isn't damned good cold, you didn't use enough milk, prolly. It dries out very quickly. But you can use dry cornbread for a ton of other things: Make yourself corned beefg and cabbage and soak up the juices with it. Pot lach juices are good on it. If you crumble it up in black eyes peas and mix some mayo in there it's pretty sweet. And old folks crumble it into buttermilk (or just milk) to eat it.


Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Oct 2008, 22:22
Man there is only one recipe for cornbread and I have it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Oct 2008, 22:23
I mean there is only one recipe for bread and I have it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Oct 2008, 22:23
I mean there is only one way to tie your shoes in the morning.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Oct 2008, 22:24
I mean there is only one way to skin a cat and I am the only one in the world to know how to do it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 22 Oct 2008, 22:55
But why would you skin a cat?  :-(
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 22 Oct 2008, 23:37
To make catbread.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 22 Oct 2008, 23:43
Tonight, I made an apple pie. Mostly from scratch. Pictures will follow shortly.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 23 Oct 2008, 00:23
Awesome. Me an the lady are making cherry pie together tonight (this is not a euphemism). We have the best cooking adventures together.

Hey Cooking Thread, I've got a bunch of mustard seeds left over from an old recipe and I don't know what to use them for. Suggest recipes nnnnnnnnnnow.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 23 Oct 2008, 04:59
I once ground them in a coffeegrinder then transferred them to a blender an added some vinegar and ...I don't remember if there was anything else. It made fuckin' spicy brown mustard.

Also, Guido's cornbread "recipe" is the correct one assuming he means "only then do you add the batter" because the oil should already be in there.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 23 Oct 2008, 06:26
Quote
I am pretty sure fish is higher up on that list because I know you have to cook it the lowest.  The way I was always taught the temps to cook food is the farther from the ground the higher the temp.  So fish, pork, beef, ground beef/pork, poultry(you have to pretend all birds fly for this.).  But maybe i am wrong.

The higher the temperature, the closer to the ground. Chicken needs to be cooked to 165, so why would you put it on top of beef, which might only be getting cooked to 125, and have the beef infected with salmonella.


I made a sandwich for breakfast today, and it might send me to hell.  It was honeyglazed ham with white cheddar and spicy mustard, but the only bread I had to make it with was Challah, which I toasted briefly.


Forthe mustard seeds, grind them and mix them with some red wine vinegar, salt, and pepper, until you get a slightly runny consistency.  Marinate some chicken in that mixture overnight, and roll the chicken in crushed pretzels.  Bake it on a rack and serve it with sauerkrat sauteed with a bit of bacon and onion.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 23 Oct 2008, 08:38
Guido, I'm pretty sure I would not like your cornbread recipe. I'm used to 50-50 proportions of whole wheat and white flour, which produces a much denser, heartier bread than other people tend to make. If your cornbread is sweet, you fail.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 23 Oct 2008, 10:34
What? Sweet cornbread is the real cornbread. Either that or cornbread that has cheddar and jalapenos in it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 23 Oct 2008, 10:41
Eh, I guess it's supposedly the 'real' cornbread, since most people tend to make it that way. It makes me want to vomit and go running for the whole wheat.
Basically I'm saying cornbread, along with lots of other recipes, are pretty much up to the individual eating it to decide what the One True Holy Grail Recipe should be.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 23 Oct 2008, 12:51
The secret to cornbread is

1. Giant stick of butter
2. Cornmeal
3. ????
4. Profit

Actually, buddah and bacon fat might be the secret to ALL southern cooking. This kid knows what is going on. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErdsYn98zm8)

Guido, I'm pretty sure I would not like your cornbread recipe. I'm used to 50-50 proportions of whole wheat and white flour, which produces a much denser, heartier bread than other people tend to make. If your cornbread is sweet, you fail.
I love you. Let's have sesk.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 23 Oct 2008, 18:22
I once ground them in a coffeegrinder then transferred them to a blender an added some vinegar and ...I don't remember if there was anything else. It made fuckin' spicy brown mustard.

Also, Guido's cornbread "recipe" is the correct one assuming he means "only then do you add the batter" because the oil should already be in there.
Erm...No. You actually heat the oil in the pan, then pour the hot oil into your batter and mix it in. Here's my family recipe:

2 cups self rising cornmeal
1 1/2 to 1 3/4 cups milk
1 egg beaten
1/4 cup of oil.
Put your oil in a large cast iron skillet and heat preheat it to 450. Mix the cornmeal and milk and egg. Pull the skillet and pour the oil in the mix, and mix it in. Pour it all in the skillet and stick it back in the oven for 20 minutes or so until it turns a nice golden color. The reason the buttermilk varies is due to humidity etc of the cornmeal. You'll need to adjust it a bit.

This is the basic cornbread recipe. everything else is just being froofroo. If it doesn't come out nice and moist you aren't using enough milk. You can use buttermilk instead of milk, but leave the egg out or it comes out way too moist.

and the kid is right. Bacon drippings are the shit. Short of that use lard. Don't use butter except to slather it on top of the finished product.

redglass, you aren't eating cornbread. You are eating wheatbread. My cornbread is only very slightly sweet--cornmeal imparts a slightly sweet, nutty flavor to the bread. People taht dump sugar in there are just being gross, imo.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 23 Oct 2008, 18:29
What? Sweet cornbread is the real cornbread. Either that or cornbread that has cheddar and jalapenos in it.

Quiet you!

*smothers Bandito before he can contaminate the rest of the world with his Mexican cornbread*

I like your version a lot, actually. But it's not basic southern cornbread. Yours goes really well on any plate of Mexican food but I'd replace the cheddar with sweet corn.*shudders*  I think yours is more an Incan style bread, while southern cornbread is a SE American Indian thing.

When I lived in LA there was this little old guy who sold nothing but tamales and oh my god they were so good! I have tried for years to replicate it but I think he had some super secret Incan ingredient that the rest of us will never know about. I think it was something to do with the cornmeal.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tommydski on 24 Oct 2008, 10:07
I just cooked a steak for my dinner and in doing so I reached into my massive spices cupboard which is a complete mess, as well as being overcrowded and dark inside. The very first seasoning I found in there, by complete coincidence -

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i318/tommydski/notjustaclevername1.jpg)

Oh huh, that's handy I guess.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 24 Oct 2008, 10:22
Thanks, now I miss my short trip to Arizona and New Mexico.

WTB authentic SW cooking recipes.

I just got back to reading this thread and WTF stuffed bell peppers are such fake bullshit SW cooking. I have never gone to a restaurant here and the establishment is like "HEY MAN, TRY OUR BELL PEPPERS." except for like Applebees or some crap.

Real food:

Take a green chile, slice it open, fill it with cheddar or jack, dip it in egg batter, fry that fucker golden. Smother it in more green chile sauce. Refried beans and fried potatoes all golden delicious on the side. Eat that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 24 Oct 2008, 12:01
Thats chile rellano.  And the Bell pepper thing is a variation of southwestern.  Mostly because it is all i had.  And in New Mexico they use a lot of peppers.  When I was in Santa Fe they pretty much shoved them down my throat, not that i mind.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 25 Oct 2008, 16:50
I cooked tonight! Fettucine alfredo om nom nom

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3001/2973155646_b421ce8960.jpg?v=0)

I experimented and put cream cheese into the sauce. SO GOOD.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 27 Oct 2008, 00:18
Forthe mustard seeds, grind them and mix them with some red wine vinegar, salt, and pepper, until you get a slightly runny consistency.  Marinate some chicken in that mixture overnight, and roll the chicken in crushed pretzels.  Bake it on a rack and serve it with sauerkrat sauteed with a bit of bacon and onion.

Doing this.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 27 Oct 2008, 14:07
I'll be making shearer stew with dumplings for a potluck Thursday. Given that it's an Australian dish and many of the forumites here are Australian, I thought I'd see what input you all might have.

Shearer Stew
2lbs Boneless lamb shoulder, 1" cubes
2oz oil
2oz flour
8oz onions, 1/4" dice
4oz carrots, 1/4" dice
4oz celery 1/4" dice
1 green pepper, roasted and peeled, 1/4" dice
2oz garlic, minced
1-2qts lamb stock
1 lb new potatoes, 1/4" dice
salt, black pepper, and worcestershire suace to taste

Sear the meat in 1oz oil and 1oz flour, remove from pan. Add remaining oil, and cook onions, celery, carrots, and peppers over low heat until softened, mixing in remaining flour and stirring until well coated.  Add lamb stock, seared lamb and potatoes, cover, and simmer until tender.

Thoughts?

I'll probably addthe potatoes later than the recipe calls for, as I don't want them to disintegrate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 27 Oct 2008, 15:22
Waaaaaltzing matilda
wwwwwwwaaaaaaaaaaaaaltzing matilda
you'lll come a waaaaaaltzing matilda with me


Stew recipe looks good! If you wanted to go for the super Australian meal, I guess you could make damper instead of dumplings. Not that many people here actually eat damper that often, but it's a pretty shearer-y thing to eat. Bonus points if you cook it in a fire.

Also Misconception that pasta looks amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 27 Oct 2008, 18:14
It was entirely fabulous. I nom'd that stuff so fast.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 27 Oct 2008, 18:35
What is it with Americans claiming that things that I've never ever heard of are Australian? First "Australian Shepherds", now this "Shearer Stew".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 27 Oct 2008, 20:29
Well, I've found three diffrent recipe's. Maybe it's just something somebody made up and claimed was Aussie? Or maybe it's not well known? I mean, you aussies don't have schools,right? You're too busy shearing sheep to bother to go. So maybe it just hasn't been writ dun yet? Ar rar rar har... (joke...joke)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 27 Oct 2008, 20:59
It came from my International Cooking textbook, from the Australia section.  Of course, rereading the section on Australian cuisine, it actually uses the word barbie
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 27 Oct 2008, 21:39
Most of Australian food is stolen from someone else, really*. That stew recipe could just have easily been from anywhere in the U.K.






*Except things like the Pie floater (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pie_floater), which are just silly. But kind've delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 28 Oct 2008, 13:30
What? Sweet cornbread is the real cornbread. Either that or cornbread that has cheddar and jalapenos in it.

Quiet you!

*smothers Bandito before he can contaminate the rest of the world with his Mexican cornbread*

I like your version a lot, actually. But it's not basic southern cornbread. Yours goes really well on any plate of Mexican food but I'd replace the cheddar with sweet corn.*shudders*  I think yours is more an Incan style bread, while southern cornbread is a SE American Indian thing.

When I lived in LA there was this little old guy who sold nothing but tamales and oh my god they were so good! I have tried for years to replicate it but I think he had some super secret Incan ingredient that the rest of us will never know about. I think it was something to do with the cornmeal.

Because I never got to respond to this, my family recipe does in fact have sweet corn in it, and we maybe add like a teaspoon or two of sugar to it as well, the cheddar and the jalapenos is just something my dad does on occasion when he feels like it. You'll be happy to know that we do in fact use a deep iron skillet and heat the oil first though. Our recipe is definitely more Border food Tejas cookin', because that's where we're from.

Also, Chile Rellenos aren't made with bell peppers, they're usually made with a very specific chile pepper called a Pablano. Stuffed Bell Peppers are an entirely different beast, usually not spicy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 28 Oct 2008, 14:00
I don't know what chile rellenos are, but my friend's brother works at an organic grocer and bought pounds of past-prime hot peppers, which we stuffed with cheese, garlic, and cilantro and baked. Roasting the peppers sweetens them and mellows the heat a little, and the cheese compensates for the spice still present. Same general idea?


P.S. Now that I think of it, I had a cookbook that made chicken-chile-rellenos, where in you sliced a chicken breast in half (so you've got two broad, thin pieces), pounded them as flat as can be, then rolled each half up around a jalapeno and some jack then breaded and baked them. I'd serve them with caramelized sliced bell pepper and spanish rice, which was a pretty delicious, easy meal.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 28 Oct 2008, 14:11
Chille Rellanos is a stuffed poblano pepper that is breaded and fried.  I can't remember the stuffing normally, but i do chorizo and queso fresco in there normally.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 28 Oct 2008, 14:11
That is not a Chile relleno recipe. Pablano peppers are much larger than jalapenos, James, and the stuffing goes inside them. Then they are coated in batter and deep fried. if something like chicken were to go in them I'd heavily spice it and shred it. cheese is usually a must. Your other pepper recipes sound like they'd taste okay though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 28 Oct 2008, 14:20
It was from the 'Better Homes and Gardens' cookbook that my mom bought me when I first moved out, so I'm not surprised that it's not the real deal. That book's idea of curry is 'make white sauce, add curry powder, add to cooked meat'.

I always found stuffed bell peppers to be not really worth the effort. It's a nice concept and looks pretty, but it doesn't actually make the stuffing that much better to be eating it out of a big pepper instead of a plate/bowl. I like stuffed tinier peppers because you get more pepper to filling.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 28 Oct 2008, 21:18
Lleno=full. Relleno=refilled.
Chiles rellenos=refilled chili peppers.
Huevos rellenos=deviled eggs (huevos del diablo=testicles).
Pollo relleno=stuffed chicken (at my host family's house in guatemala they actually deboned the chicken, filled it with meat and vegetables, and sewed it shut with needle and thread).

"Proper" chiles rellenos as we are used to them from the southwestern US are poblano peppers filled with cheese and sometimes meat and then breaded and deep fried, but I think it's not incorrect to call any filled chili pepper a "chile relleno".

In other news, for supper I had a piece of leftover pepperoni pizza with a dab of plain hummus on top. It was edible but not really great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 29 Oct 2008, 21:31
The correct pepper for a relleno is a New Mexican green chile from Hatch, NM.

This is not open for debate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 30 Oct 2008, 07:37
speaking of chilies, I made chili!

it was awesome.

It was a tomato based chili with grounds beef, pulled chicken, kidney beans, onions, green and red bell peppers, and red chilies.  I simmered the whole thing with chicken stock I made earlier and added a cup of a strong bock my roommate had (I forgot the name).  I let it simmer for about 2 hours, it was pretty thick by the time dinner rolled around.

the only thing better than chili for dinner, is a breakfast burrito the next morning made of chili, scrambled eggs, and chedder cheese with a strong cup of coffee.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 30 Oct 2008, 07:41
It's very much not cooking but I had nice ice cream for breakfast today. Also two boiled eggs which were boiled as hard as bullets because I like them that way.

My favourite sandwich is cold mashed potato with salad cream mashed into it, between seeded brown bread. There is nothing more filling and delicious, unless it is the aforementioned sandwich with tomato slices in it too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 30 Oct 2008, 07:53
The correct pepper for a relleno is a New Mexican green chile from Hatch, NM.

This is not open for debate.

Hatch area green chiles are good, but not the best for chile relleno, i still prefer the pablano by far, usually because of its size and spicyness level. Most of the Hatch varieties just aren't big enough, and their long skinny shape isn't conducive to stuffing full of cheesy goodness.

I mean, this guy (http://www.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/1973981/2/istockphoto_1973981_hatch_green_chili.jpg) is all well in good, but nothing compared to this beast (http://365daysveg.files.wordpress.com/2008/02/poblanopepper.jpg).

Karamazov, that is a decent sounding chili recipe.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 30 Oct 2008, 10:35
I baked lovely cinnamon rolls today! I thought I'd killed the yeast, but they turned out okay after all, and they rose okay. Not as good looking as they were the last time I baked them aaaages ago, but they tasted better, so I guess that's a decent compromise.

(http://bilder.tykjpelk.net/skitch/Kanelboller-20081030-183426.png)

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 30 Oct 2008, 12:11
What exactly is "sukker"? Is it flour?

Also those look delicious and I would like to have them right now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 30 Oct 2008, 12:14
"Sukker" is sugar. Flour is "mel" ("siktet hvetemel" in the picture). And they were quite delicious, I had to put them in the freezer so that I wouldn't eat them all too quickly :p
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 30 Oct 2008, 12:18
Now that you have told me it is totally obvious. The one bag has wheat on it.

Guys I think I am going to call in dumb to work today. My brain is obviously not fully functional
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 30 Oct 2008, 12:38
Ladybug marry me now, those look amazing and I have no head for baking.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 30 Oct 2008, 17:32
Sure! As long as you do all the other cooking.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 05 Nov 2008, 11:44
I should have taken a photo of the pie I made but it was so fabulous that I didn't.

Here's the recipe:

Walnut-Bourbon Pie with Honey Whipped Cream

Crust: I suppose you can make one, but I buy mine in the frozen food aisle and let it thaw for about 20 minutes before baking. I used a 9-inch pie shell.

Preheat oven to 375F.

Nuts:
Toast 2 cups walnut halves and pieces for 8-10 minutes in the preheating oven. Let them cool to room temperature in a large bowl or plate, then put them in the pie shell.

Filling:
In a mixing bowl, blend together 4 eggs and 3/4 cups brown sugar. When smooth, add 3/4 cup corn syrup, 4 Tbsp melted butter, 2 Tbsp bourbon (I used Knob Creek), 2 tsp vanilla and a pinch of salt.

Pour mixture gently over the nuts, which should float to the top. If any of the nuts look dry, poke them down with a clean finger; they need to be coated with sugary liquid.

Place pie on a baking sheet to catch any drips and bake for 30-40 minutes. The filling will puff up and smell delicious. The crust should get brown but not smell scorched.

Topping:
Beat together 1 pint heavy whipping cream with 1/4 cup honey until the cream gets fluffy. Don't beat it too long or you'll have honey-flavored butter.

Spread whipped cream over pie no more than 2 hours before serving. Keep it refrigerated if you're not eating it right away. Eat leftover whipped cream on waffles for breakfast the next day (there will be too much to reasonably serve on the pie).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 05 Nov 2008, 20:18
you say be careful not to create honey flavored butter, I say make that a dangerously close distinction.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 05 Nov 2008, 22:30
James is very broke, slightly crippled, a little lazy, and all out of food:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 06 Nov 2008, 00:23
I started my new job today. It is all kinds of fun.

I did garde manger and desserts all night, which isn't that much fun, but i got to arrange a bunch of cheese plates and blowtorch some creme brulee, so it was worth it. 

I also got to cook myself dinner. I made swordfish with crawfish butter and sirrochi-marinated tobacco onions over white cheddar and apple bacon grits wth a little grilled asparagus on the side.

It was delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 06 Nov 2008, 00:28
I just cooked myself dinner.
It was plain pasta.
I am poor and lazy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Social Bacon on 09 Nov 2008, 11:26
Social Bacon's Best Sloppy Joes!
Fast, easy, cheap and an excuse to drink beer.
-Get a small pan, fill the very bottom of the pan with beer (0.5cm deep is good)
-Get some ground beef, throw that ground beef in your beer filled pan
-Throw that badass stove on high and start cooking your beefy-beer goodness
-Drink the remainder of the bottle of beer while the beefy-beer goodness is cooking
-Once all of the beer in the pan has boiled off your beef should be nicely cooked and the beer should have drawn off the excess fat and grease (if not, drain the fat and grease now)
-Lower the heat on the stove to medium
-Mix in a reasonable amount of tomato sauce (any kind will do, it's all delicious, I used a tomato basil pasta sauce last night) and some brown sugar
-Cook until the consistency thickens nicely and the concoction achieves a nice reddish-brown colour
-Throw this delicious smelling mix onto a bun or bread of any kind
-Devour!

Note: Measuring ingredients is for the weak.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 Nov 2008, 11:54
We are getting the new kitchen that we've been thinking about for several years!  This weekend, and over the next few evenings, I am putting new ceiling lights and speakers in place:

(http://cassland.org/images/Ceiling.jpg)

before the builder comes to replaster, tile the floor and then install all the boxes:

(http://cassland.org/images/Boxes.jpg)

So I made a last Quiche Lorraine and Cauliflower Cheese before the dust takes over:

(http://cassland.org/images/Quiche.jpg)

My wife has left me to it while she babysits my grandson in Germany.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 12 Nov 2008, 21:15
Anyone got a good BBQ sauce recipe?  I'm looking for a good sauce for ribs.  Preferably tomato based.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 12 Nov 2008, 22:43
I made some some chicken stock the other day, then used about half of it to make baked potato soup, which was delicious and I plan on making more often.

I am using the other half for gelatin filtration to make a consomme.  I want to see how well it works with natural gelatin then I will move on to leaf gelatin, instant gelatin, agar, and gellan.  Then later i may buy some cargeenan iota and kappa and see how those work.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 13 Nov 2008, 00:35
Anyone got a good BBQ sauce recipe?  I'm looking for a good sauce for ribs.  Preferably tomato based.

Off the top of my head..

1qt Ketchup
2Tbsp liquid smoke
2Tbsp Honey
1cp brown sugar
1/2 Tbsp salt
1 tbsp black pepper
1tsp chipotle powder (or cayenne pepper)
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1tsp cinnamon
1tsp celery salt
1tsp garlic salt
1tsp onion powder

I don't usually measure when I make it, so you might need to experiment with the measurements a bit.

@abadname: Gelatin filtration for consomme?  Is that something other than the traditional raft method?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 13 Nov 2008, 00:47
Paul that quiche looks perfect (and I'm a big sucker for cauliflower cheese). Come cook for me while your kitchen's out.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 13 Nov 2008, 01:22
Yes it is, you add enough gelatin to where it doesnt completely set but still has the texture then you freeze it.  Thaw in the fridge wrapped in cheeseclothe through a chinoise into a pot/bowl.  It will take a couple days but you are left with a perfectly clear liquid with no flavor loss, it is the clear essence of whatever the consomme is.  Pretty rad stuff, look it up for a probably better explanation.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: evernew on 13 Nov 2008, 02:25
One of my favorite own creations is the following for balsamico salad dressing:

(1) Dice one apple and one onion. Like, really go to town on them. The resulting pieces should measure 3 mm along each side max.
(2) Put into plastic bowl with lid (Tupperware works great).
(3) Add balsamico vinegar and olive oil. My family likes the dressing packing some punch so I'll use the vinegar liberally. Adjust to taste.
(4) Add pepper and salt, again to taste.
(5) Seal the lid and shake it like whatever you like to shake a lot. Stirring would work but shaking gets it done in about 10 seconds.
(6) Open the container for inspection. The resulting dressing should be viscous, medium to dark brown (depending on the ratio of vinegar vs. oil used) and have little pieces of apple and onion floating around which are getting more saturated with the dressing gradually.
(7) Crack and cut some walnuts. This is optional.

The dressing works with pretty much every green salad, greek salad, chef salad etc.

For extra-special eating delight, serve the dressing separately instead of pouring it over the salad. That way the greens stay fresh and don't soak, you can adjust the salad-to-dressing ratio on the fly and if you have any leftovers, you can just put them back in the fridge and enjoy them freshly instead of, as previously observed, in a soaked state.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: BankHoldUp on 13 Nov 2008, 10:43
Take a green chile, slice it open, fill it with cheddar or jack, dip it in egg batter, fry that fucker golden. Smother it in more green chile sauce. Refried beans and fried potatoes all golden delicious on the side. Eat that.

I made an awesome relleno a little while ago when someone at a farmers market had huge Anaheim chiles for cheap, so I couldn't pass them up.

I broiled the chiles to remove the skin and then stuffed them through the stem-end with a Queso Blanco. (soft, crumbly white cheese). Then I made up a beer batter using a Mexican pilsner and corn flour, adding in chopped fresh cilantro, paprika, salt, garlic and a bit of lime juice.

I battered the now cheese stuffed peppers and tossed them into a frying pan until the batter was crispy and golden brown. Served it up with some white rice with cilantro and lime, and a mixture of black beans and roasted corn.

It came out great but skinning the chiles is a pain in the ass, so I doubt I'll try it again anytime soon.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 13 Nov 2008, 13:49
It's a lot easier to cook the chiles over a flame until blackened, and then seal them in an airtight container while hot.  They will steam themselves, and after twenty minutes or so, the skin slides off by running under cold water.

I googled gelatin filtration. It looks like the coolest thing since sliced bread.  I'm going to try this after brunch Sunday. I'm thinking Salmon poached in essence of dill, just to see how well it works with an old classic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 13 Nov 2008, 18:49
Running it under under cold water kind of washes the flavor off, or that is what I was always taught.

But yeah the gelatin filtration is rad, my mentor chef made "peanut butter and jelly" and the bread was a granola consomme that was gelled and cubed.  It was awesome.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 14 Nov 2008, 07:51
Yeah, you don't need to rinse them after roasting them and letting them sit in a container OR a plastic bag. After a little while the skin should just rub right off, and you keep that grilled/roasted flavor on em. For some reason I've been itching to try this with pepper jack and beef stuffing for a while now, to try and add a little extra twist to it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 14 Nov 2008, 08:34
after experienting for a while i finally figured out a pretty rad pasta sauce recipe so i will maybe put that up later tonight. it uses ground soy instead of ground beef so even the vegetarian folk get to be included.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: BankHoldUp on 14 Nov 2008, 09:16
Yeah, you don't need to rinse them after roasting them and letting them sit in a container OR a plastic bag. After a little while the skin should just rub right off, and you keep that grilled/roasted flavor on em. For some reason I've been itching to try this with pepper jack and beef stuffing for a while now, to try and add a little extra twist to it.

This is what I did, sealed them in a zipper bag and let them sweat for a while before pulling the skins off. The open flame idea sounds neat, I think I give that a try next time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 14 Nov 2008, 12:47
I'm so confused right now, wasn't that posted in the video games forum?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 14 Nov 2008, 13:31
Jon is having an aneurysm of some sort.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jmrz on 14 Nov 2008, 14:23
Okay, I have my family christmas party coming up soon (we have it early because we are spread out everywhere) and it is about two and a half hour drive from where I live. This year, it's been decided that the parents (so my parents, are bringing the various types of meat), and their children (my generation/my cousins) are to bring some kind of side dishes or something to have with it. Now, everything I can think of that I can actually cook requires it to be eaten hot and it wouldn't transport very well at all. So I was thinking of taking some cakes/cookies/muffins/cupcakes or something.

What do you guys think? Would there be anything that isn't baked goodies that I could easily transport without it getting ruined? If not, what type of baked things would you suggest - I want it so that everyone can eat some of it (which means I want to bring something suitable for 7/8 year old kids to like, grandparentals).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Skibas_clavicle on 14 Nov 2008, 14:23
Just made boxed scalloped potatoes. The box was bought in 2005. The potatoes turned out surprisingly delicious!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 15 Nov 2008, 01:58
What do you guys think? Would there be anything that isn't baked goodies that I could easily transport without it getting ruined? If not, what type of baked things would you suggest - I want it so that everyone can eat some of it (which means I want to bring something suitable for 7/8 year old kids to like, grandparentals).

Chicken Salad maybe?

Cook some chicken breast however you like, mix in sliced grapes, mayo, celery, salt, pepper, sweated onions, a little bit of dijon mustard, and candied pecans. If you have a cooler, take it all with you on ice, and assemble it once you get to where you're going.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 16:23
Dear Cooking Thread,

I just washed, halved, and seeded three or four dozen hot peppers. They are now being exposed to low heat in an oven where they will dry over the course of a couple hours. On top of the oven, is a pan with the seeds, which will dry some, then be toasted when the peppers are dry. I am not sure if toasting hot pepper seeds is even a thing, but I am going to try.
Also I have a delicious pot of chicken stock on the boil and I feel very homey.
Also MY GODDAMN HANDS ARE ON FIRE AHHHHH AHHHHH AHHHHH IT HURTS IT HURTS THE PAIN

Cordially,
James
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 19 Nov 2008, 16:29
shoulda used gloves man.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 16:38
The word yes has not yet been said enough times in the history of civilization for me to be able to have a meaningful metric with which to describe how much yes I want to say to that.


How do I make the hurt go away?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 19 Nov 2008, 17:01
I do not know.

But I am making bread! Well, I will be when I finish doing the dishes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 19 Nov 2008, 17:12
How do I make the hurt go away?
Milk is supposed to help if you've eaten too much, so maybe it'll work on your hands as well? I have no idea, really, but a suggestion is better than nothing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 17:16
I was thinking of washing my hands in milk but then thought that would just be really sad.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 19 Nov 2008, 17:25
vaseline.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 17:47
thankyouphil
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 18:43
Pain update: yup, I'm about to try washing my hands with milk.

Pain update update: helped only by being cold. Hands still on fire, but skin is nice and soft between the moisturizer and the milk.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 19 Nov 2008, 18:55
I hear cutting them off might help.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 19:18
Dear lord I am getting there. I just used the washroom. Fucking uncomfortable. Oh god. Oh god.

I am going to go take all the drugs I have.
They all come over the counter at drug stores but I am taking them all anyways.
And maybe some liquor.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 19:23
Line of reasoning: jesus this burning is not going away how can I make it go away I don't know who eats hot food india eats hot food what do I have that is indian and not hot I've got tamarind past excellent I'll eat some tamarind paste *insert spoon* wait how will eating this make my hands feel better OH GOD SO SOUR SO MUCH TAMARIND IN MY MOUTH OH GOD WHAT HAVE I DONE.

NEW ACTION PLAN:1) WALK DOWN ROAD IN COLD WITHOUT MITS TO MOVIE RENTAL PLACE
2) RENT MOVIE I WANT TO WATCH (QUICKLY!)
3) WALK HOME IN THE COLD, STILL NO MITS
4) PUT MOVIE IN LAPTOP, PRESS PLAY, PUT HANDS IN BOWL FILLED WITH ICE WATER
5) WAIT UNTIL MOVIE IS OVER
6) COME UP WITH NEW PLAN

I really wish I was joking.


P.S. But I can't leave the house because I have hot peppers in the oven! ahhhhhHHHHHHHHHh
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Nov 2008, 21:40
vaseline.

Don't! Is actually one of the worse things you can do in the situation, apparently. My hands still hurt. Telehealth has just instructed me to soak my hands in a bowl of milk after washing them well. I do not know who to trust but I'm not going to emergency with this shit.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: supersheep on 20 Nov 2008, 00:03
It might be a bit late, but another suggestion is something acidic, like strong alcohol or lemon juice or vinegar.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 20 Nov 2008, 04:01
Been there done that still in pain thanks anyways.
I went to emerg. They weren't much help besides telling me to keep washing my hands regularly and I waited for an hour in a chair with a bowl of ice water for my hands so I could sleep sitting up for an hour at least.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 21 Nov 2008, 06:23
Follow up: If you do use vaseline, scour your hands with baking soda and water until water runs smoothly and does not bead, then soak your hands in Maalox or any white liquid antacid (pepto-bismol is no good, it's pink!) for half an hour to forty-five minutes. Wash and soak again if necessary. Cheaper alternatives to liquid antacid are vegetable oil or milk, but they aren't as good.
Man that was a painful day and a half.

Also, if it burns abnormally much, treat it right away. That shit if fat soluble, not water soluble, so if you let it sit it soaks into you and then you're fucked. Soak it in milk, vegetable, or if you feel like pissing away expensive antacid, use that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: J-cob9000 on 21 Nov 2008, 17:49
The word yes has not yet been said enough times in the history of civilization for me to be able to have a meaningful metric with which to describe how much yes I want to say to that.


How do I make the hurt go away?
Same thing happened to mother. Places from google say urine works quite well. Milk didn't work for her.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Krina on 22 Nov 2008, 03:45
Another fun thing to do: Put in your contact lenses after you've just cut and seeded hot peppers (without the obvious washing of hands inbetween). I wonder when (if?) I will ever get any smarter...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eli on 22 Nov 2008, 08:26
Anyone have good recipes or tips for pancakes or hot cocoa? I usually use the hot cocoa recipe on theside of the Nestle baking cocoa box, but it develops a weird film over the top and I do just a basic pancake batter.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ladybug on 22 Nov 2008, 08:58
But the film over the top is part of what makes it proper hot cocoa! Kakao med snerk.

I would type up the pancake recipe I use, but they're not like American pancakes, so maybe not.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 22 Nov 2008, 10:59
Follow up: If you do use vaseline, scour your hands with baking soda and water until water runs smoothly and does not bead, then soak your hands in Maalox or any white liquid antacid (pepto-bismol is no good, it's pink!) for half an hour to forty-five minutes. Wash and soak again if necessary. Cheaper alternatives to liquid antacid are vegetable oil or milk, but they aren't as good.
Man that was a painful day and a half.

Also, if it burns abnormally much, treat it right away. That shit if fat soluble, not water soluble, so if you let it sit it soaks into you and then you're fucked. Soak it in milk, vegetable, or if you feel like pissing away expensive antacid, use that.

I was joking, you didn't use vaseline did you? oh god.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Nov 2008, 17:39
Phil I might punch you in the face if I ever see you again.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Nov 2008, 18:17
(That is joking)
(clearly this is not 'ask your friends for advice on things that hurt you a lot forum' and is in fact 'these people have all slpet with each forum')
(I'm definitely not sleeping with you now, though, Phil)

(well maybe, but you're catching)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 22 Nov 2008, 18:20
Ahh, finally a use for the vaseline then.

(NO. No, nononononononononononononononono)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 23 Nov 2008, 09:14
i don't know if baking counts as cooking but people seem to read this thread pretty often, so screw it. a friend today gave me me the raddest brownie recipe ever and i feel it really needs to be shared.

here's what you need:
1 (18.25 ounce) package chocolate cake mix
1 cup evaporated milk
1/2 cup melted butter or margarine
35 caramels, unwrapped
2 cups semi-sweet chocolate chips
and, if you want, 1 cup chopped nuts

here's what you do:
1. preheat your oven to 350 degrees F
2. combine the cake mix + nuts together in a big bowl, then add the butter and 2/3 of the evaporated milk. it's going to be really thick and gooey.
3. pour half of this into an ungreased 13 x 9 baking pan.
4. bake it for 15 minutes.
5. put the caramels and remaining evaporated milk into a pan and heat it on low heat until it's also melted and gooey.
6. sprinkle the chocolate chips onto the brownies
7. then drip the melted caramel on top of them.
8. then pour the remaining brownie mixture on top of that.
9. then you bake that for another 25-30 minutes. let them cool in the pan.
10. eat them all
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 23 Nov 2008, 09:32
Oh man. Again, I wish I had had internet.

Vodka is the correct solution.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 23 Nov 2008, 10:59
i don't know if baking counts as cooking--

Here's my formula for it.

raw ingredients+chemical reaction of some kind(heat, through smoking, grilling or baking;curing, brining, pickling, fermenting etc.)=tasty edibles that are greater than the sum of their parts = cooking.

So baking under it would be considered cookin' in my book. Things that are on the borderline are Steak Tartare(which is marinated and served on toast in most cases) and Sushi(since its made with cooked rice).

Things that this does not include are Sashimi (unless its octopus, which is generally cooked due to toughness), and raw salads.


I wish I had brownies....

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 23 Nov 2008, 11:06
if you are going to be in chicago next year and are willing to wait seven months for brownies, i will make them just for you.
but also kind of for me because i eat everything and have no self-control.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 23 Nov 2008, 11:12
I also feel like Sannakji should not be classified as being cooked. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sannakji)


Sweet. Brownies. I will probably find some way to have some from another source before then. But I will also have some there.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 23 Nov 2008, 11:22
Well Tania, Kris and I were already planning on having a baking party at Matt's place, so I guess you can join us and make some brownies. It will be fun times!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 23 Nov 2008, 11:44
woooo
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 23 Nov 2008, 11:46
Also I think the plan might be to watch Street Fighter that night/afternoon?

I am not entirely positive.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gemmwah on 23 Nov 2008, 11:48
Even if it's not the plan, that should totally BE the plan.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 23 Nov 2008, 12:04
yeah i'm not taking no for an answer on that
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 23 Nov 2008, 12:23
I say make it a Street Fighter/Super Mario Bros./Ninja Turtles 2 medley.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 23 Nov 2008, 15:22
So, there is the literal interpretation of 'cooking' or there is the sentiment represented in this thread. If anyone gets uppity about 'cooking' and 'baking' and 'food prep' I will punch them in the face after I am done sodomizing Phil.
I doubt anyone will object though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 23 Nov 2008, 16:59
I won't object to that last part as long as you take pix

On the topic of Baking, it would appear that baking has become a Thing Me and My Girlfriend Do All The Time. Last weekend we made Chelsea Scrolls (which are like cinnamon scrolls but with icing on top and currants in the middle) and this weekend we made raisin oatmeal cookies. So now I have a stomach ache because we made about 4 dozen of the fuckers and ate all of them in two days. But that is OK with me.

Tonight I am going to a pot luck and I am thinking of making either pierogis (which look incredibly hard to make but I have never even tried and want to because people keep telling me about them) or stuffed chillies (which also look pretty hard but not as hard as pierogis and I also really really want to make because of all the talk about them in this thread and also I have no idea how hard it is to get suitably large chillies around here).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 24 Nov 2008, 16:31
Dudes, Thanksgiving is this week! What are the other Murricans planning?

I'm having my husband's family over to our apartment.. :-o I'm kinda freaking out about it because I'm not sure when I'll be able to go grocery shopping. I am going to make: Broccoli and (Soy) Chicken Braid, Sweet Potato Casserole, Cranberry Sauce, and "Mixed Green Salad with Oranges, Dried Cranberries and Pecans". And rolls. And maybe some stuffing. But those are easy. The broccoli braid and casserole are standard holiday fare for my family. The cranberry sauce and salad I found recipes for online. They both use dried cranberries.. should be interesting. Photos and reviews after Thursday!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 24 Nov 2008, 17:30
We're doing Yanksgiving at our house, on account of having a couple of Americans staying with us.

Apparently Turkeys are really expensive here, so not sure if we'll be doing turkey... might have to settle for a roast chicken. Definitely going to have some kind of sweet potato dish, pumpkin pie, and whatever our guests bring. I'm on entrees, and I'm doing prawns wrapped in prosciutto with herbs and lemon zest, fried cheesy eggplant fritters, and baked brie.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 24 Nov 2008, 19:20
I'm not sure what we're having for Thanksgiving yet, but I do know that today for dinner I made french toast. Simplest thing ever.
2 eggs
1 cup of milk
couple teaspoons of cinnamon
all mixed together
soak some pieces of bread in it for a few seconds
fry them in a pan with some butter
syrup on top
delicious.

My brother told me to add nutmeg, but I'm not big on nutmeg in my french toast, so I told him where to put the nutmeg.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 24 Nov 2008, 21:33
Back on the spice rack?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: CarrionMan on 24 Nov 2008, 21:36
I want to make a pie. Any recommendations on a flavor that isn't too extraordinaire.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 24 Nov 2008, 21:46
Back on the spice rack?

exactly. And then I told him to go fuck himself. *badum ching!*
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 24 Nov 2008, 22:57
Apple Pie is delicious.  If you are feeling frisky, add some Vidalia onions.  It will taste so good
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 27 Nov 2008, 08:17
I am making stuffing with mushrooms and sausage and sage and hazelnuts and Amaretto. It is going to be amazing. Oh yes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 28 Nov 2008, 10:10
I cooked things yesterday. They were successful. I didn't get to take pictures of the finished products, though. But I discovered that the beer & wine store across the street sells adorable mini-bottles of wine that were the perfect size for the 1 cup that I needed for the cranberry sauce.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 28 Nov 2008, 10:12
OR you buy a real bottle of wine and get the in-laws sloshed. Geeze.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 01 Dec 2008, 09:03
yeah but it was only $2.35 and the in-laws drink beer.

which we DO still have scads of left from the wedding. there was no red wine left, which is why i was buying some.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: J-cob9000 on 04 Dec 2008, 04:02
A while back I made this awesome casserole thing that I call cheeseburger pie. It consists of browning some sausage/beef and onions in the same pan, putting them in the bottom of a 9x13 pan and mixing up some Bisquick or an equivalent quick bread making thing and pouring that over it and baking it for 25 minutes. It comes out like a cheeseburger but in pie form!
It was scrumptious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 05 Dec 2008, 21:48
I made my own birthday cake! It was a Tiramisu.

I took this stuff

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a55/ddovey/IMG_0861.jpg)

and turned it into this

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a55/ddovey/IMG_0863.jpg)

and then I had some with a glass of the Glenlivet.

(http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a55/ddovey/IMG_0865.jpg)

In all honesty I am pretty cool.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 14 Dec 2008, 17:22
I just successfully used the raft clarification method on a chicken stock I made.  I feel really proud.  There is only one problem, ladling out the stock without disturbing the raft.

Update: Got it, I made gently made a large hole at the top and slowly ladled the stock through a china cap into separate containers which I then quickly chilled.  It has cleared up so much, I could read the date of a penny at the bottom of the pot.  (not that I actually threw a penny in it)  Additionally lost almost no flavor during the clarification process.  Its still pretty dark, almost the color of honey.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 15 Dec 2008, 09:49
A way I learned to get out all of the consomme is to get a length of hose and siphon it out.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: St.Germain on 15 Dec 2008, 22:00
In honor of upcoming holidays, I offer my variation on cranberry sauce. If this seems to be a more Thanksgiving thing, bear in mind I have it for all holidays. Well, the winter ones, anyway.

Note: This is a whole-berry sauce, none of that jellified piffle here.

We begin with the recipe off the package of cranberries:

INGREDIENTS:

1 cup sugar
1 cup water
1 12-ounce package Ocean Spray® Fresh or Frozen Cranberries

DIRECTIONS:

Combine sugar and water in a medium saucepan. Bring to boil; add cranberries, return to boil. Reduce heat and boil gently for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cover and cool completely at room temperature. Refrigerate until serving time. Makes 2 1/4 cups.

While this is all well and good, I got in the habit of adding things to it, and then adding things to those things. So, I add:

1 cup (or a handful, whatever) fresh or frozen raspberries (I use frozen, because my parents' freezer in full of them)
Zest of 1 orange, or most of an orange, at least half (I abandoned trying to use a little grater, and just took a potato peeler to the thing. Then I had to chop the peel into littler buts, but it was easier in the end)

Add these ingredients about halfway though the 'boil 10 minutes" part. Raspberries are very soft, and get obliterated as it is.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 16 Dec 2008, 05:45
I am making turducken again tomorrow.
We wanted a 4.5 pound chicken, 5.5 pound duck, and 15 pound turkey, but the smallest duck my friend could find was 9 pounds, so he got a 25 pound turkey to compensate. So we have, like, forty pounds of bird.
This is going to be stupid.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Tyler on 16 Dec 2008, 07:44
40 pounds? Holy god.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 16 Dec 2008, 09:48
This is going to be stupid.

stupid awesome.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 16 Dec 2008, 09:59
Stupid erotic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KibBen on 16 Dec 2008, 10:39
So, according to wikipedia, I'm a skilled saucier.

Quote
(Regarding cooking methods for hollandaise sauce) Room temperature is too low; most stovetop burners and even double boilers are too hot, and will overcook the egg causing it to scramble, though skilled sauciers are able to prepare their mixtures over an open burner.

I just made hollandaise sauce RIGHT IN THE PAN. I am so impressed with myself right now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 16 Dec 2008, 20:28
This is going to be stupid.

stupid awesome.

Got dinner plans tomorrow?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 16 Dec 2008, 20:38
dogg i hope you are serious, because you better believe i will take the first bus to waterloo if it means i get to help eat 40 pounds of bird
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Dec 2008, 06:17
The edible portion of the birds will probably be between 20-30 pounds since there is a lot of bone in them, but yeah, if you want, you are welcome.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Dec 2008, 14:31
MY HOUSE IS FULL OF SMOKE AND MEAT
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 17 Dec 2008, 15:03
Whoah, our turducken at thanksgiving was boneless. How do you carve it with bones left in there?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Dec 2008, 23:19
We boned them, I was just saying how when we bought the 40 pounds of bird, there was lots of bone. I made chicken-duck stock with the bones!
We left the turkey wings intact, hacked the duck wings off and strapped them on top of the turkey to cover up the seems, and our chicken wings were expertly de-boned by the amateur boner (she's got two generations of butcher behind her, though).
Man that's a lot of fun.

Disturbingly enough, we ate pretty much all of it. There's enough left for hot turkey sandwiches tomorrow, but it's pretty much all cleaned up. We had a good crowd out to eat!


So what's the 'raft method' for clarifying stock that was being mentioned earlier on? I have two liters of chicken-duck stock that I need to do something with now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 18 Dec 2008, 14:36

the raft method involves mixing egg whites, a mirepox, an acid, and ground meat (chicken in your or turkey in your case to match the stock).  I've only used it once, but it worked terrifically. 

someone else can probably explain it better than I can, but you mix these ingredients in chilled stock and continually stir while you bring it up to heat.  When the stock gets hot enough, the egg whites and ground meat solidify and encase the impurities in the stock.  After a while, the protein mass will float up to the surface and you can ladle the clarified stock out.  It looks amazing, but may reduce some of the taste.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 18 Dec 2008, 15:55
What are the impurities in this case? Colour impurities, little bits of flotasm, taste impurities?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: -Karamazov- on 18 Dec 2008, 16:21
The cloudiness of the stock and any little bits of junk floating around.  Impurities was a bad word to use in this case.

You might want to try gelatin filtration, I just read an about it here: http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/05/dining/05curi.html?ex=1346731200&en=c5ed30afe5c4cdcf&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink

It sounds like an awesome process.  I'm especially impressed by how it removes all the fat and allows you to make it with virtually anything.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 18 Dec 2008, 16:34
Curious! I'm leaving the place I live in for christmas in a few days, so I'll probably freeze the stock now and thaw it when I get back. I hope that doesn't affect it too much.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 18 Dec 2008, 21:41
It doesn't.  If your stock is really good and hearty is should already have enough requesite gelatin in it.  Does your stock get kind of jiggly and thick when cooled?

And the gelatine process is awesome.  You can actually do it with any gelling agent.  I keep doing it with new things.

But a carrot consomme is the coolest thing, put some confit rabbit with it and you have just make the culinary god smile.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 28 Dec 2008, 21:46
A rough recipe for the clarification method:

1lb lean (as lean as possible) ground meat
1/2 lb mirepoix
8oz egg whites
4oz acid (I use white wine for lighter stocks like chicken or fish, and red wine for a good brown veal stock. Go crazy!)
1 gallon Stock

Chill all ingredients thoroughly, and mix everything except the stock together.  Add the mixture to your cold stock, and slowly bring up the heat, continuously stirring to avoid egg whites burning to the bottom of the pot.  Once you hit a slight simmer, stop stirring and carefully monitor the heat. You want to avoid a full on simmer or boil, as that will break the raft. Poaching temperature (160-180) is ideal. Poke a hole in the center of your raft with a ladle, and continuously ladle the stock over the edges of the raft, slowly, and trying to keep the sides of the raft balanced. Do this until you can pour the stock in a rocks glass and read the year of a dime sitting at the bottom of the glass, and you've got yourself a consomme.  If any fat remains in your clarified stock when finished, pour it through a coffee filter while hot.  I like to put a baked custard in the center of the consomme as a showpiece, basically creme anglaise minus the sugar and vanilla, with a bit of tabasco and worcestershire sauce added.

DELICIOUS
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: MrBlu on 30 Dec 2008, 23:33
I'm seeing a chef.

He wants me to cook for him.

What do I do?
Tell him he's a flipping idiot.

I'm a chef, and I'd never ask my girlfriend to cook for me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gilead on 30 Dec 2008, 23:46
If you spend all day working in a stressful kitchen cooking it would probably actually be a really nice thing to have someone care enough that they'd cook for you and let you relax.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 31 Dec 2008, 22:58
Yeah well, I cooked for him a while back and he said thanks very sincerely and also had seconds, but also now I guess we aren't seeing each other or something so I guess it's a moot point anyway.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: mbb on 02 Jan 2009, 13:50
Posting one of my favorite holiday recipes:

Recipe for Sara's smokey, spicy, savory Butternut Squash soup!
(note, this is to be regarded more as a set of guidelines than instructions. food is meant to be played with!)

Take one butternut squash, peal, seed, and chop into approx 1 inch cubes (doesn't have to be exact). Peel 4 cloves of garlic and mince. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and a little powdered garlic and sauté in 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat until squash is golden in color. Add veggie broth to pan (all natural, with no added msg for best results), enough so the squash has is thoroughly immersed, but not enough for the squash to swim in it. Simmer until squash is extremely tender, about 15 minutes. Transfer to blender or food processor and puree mixture and then transfer to sufficent pan over low heat. Add 1 1/2 cups of milk. Add 2 tblspoons fresh chopped basil, 1 tblspoon cumin, 1 tblspoon chili powder, 1 tspoon cayenne pepper. Garnish with fresh chopped parsley and serve.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 02 Jan 2009, 15:20
I have posted this in at least two places already but I made a lemon meringue pie and chocolate mousse! They both came out great (haven't tried the pie yet) although the timing for the pie was a little off, I didn't put the oven on the heat up early enough so I had to wait to cook it, and it took several attempts to separate eggs successfully so we had scrambled egg for tea.

Anyway pictures will follow once I've got them off the camera. I'm pretty chuffed, meringue is famously difficult and it worked! The electric whisk probably helped a bit.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Masterbainter on 03 Jan 2009, 06:08
I was bored/drunk this morning and I thought i'd make food. 

Took a deer tendeloin, cooked with some spices and used some pepper jack cheese on top.  I cut it up into small piece..
Then I made an cheese omelet but didn't fold it all the way in(if you triple fold) .. so it was like a little egg plate with a cheesy bottom
I heated up some cream of mushroom soup and poured it into the cheese egg plate.. I put the cut up deer steak pieces in it and put some A1 on top.

Really not too bad.. I will leave out the steak seasoning next time though.  I didn't go with any of it.


edit: drugs are bad
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 03 Jan 2009, 13:38
I made a gallon and a half of turkey stock yesterday, today i made some risotto with it and later I'll use it to make some soup.

Turkey stock is so good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 09 Jan 2009, 15:01
stir fry is a cheap, easy and pretty healthy meal for students and busy people. this here is a pretty good recipe to start with for people who don't normally do this kind of thing. i make extra and eat the leftovers for a few days after.
 
ingredients (for the most part, these can be varied to taste):
1 pound skinless chicken breasts
1 garlic clove, minced
3 teaspoons oil (i prefer olive... and don't use extra virgin, you silly people)
3 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
pinch of salt
pinch of pepper
chopped vegetables of your choice (enough for about 3-4 servings) - i prefer peppers, broccoli, snow peas, sweet onions and white mushrooms.
2 teaspoons cornstarch
1 tablespoon cold water
and, hot cooked rice or couscous.

directions:
1. cook the chicken. chop it up. set it aside.
2. chop up the vegetables and garlic.
3. put the veggies and garlic in a big wok or pan (preferably wok) with about 3 tablespoons of oil. set the stove to medium and stir fry that shit for about 5-10 minutes or until it's all nice and cooked.
4. turn down the heat to about medium-low and add the chicken, honey, soy sauce, salt and pepper. cook that for about 5-10 minutes, until the juices are runny and it's all well mixed and delicious-smelling. this is also a good time to make your rice or couscous, while the veggies and chicken are sitting in there soaking in the flavour.
5. in a separate cup, combine the cornstarch and water until smooth. add that to your stir-fry. bring it to a boil and cook for a couple of minutes, or until your sauce thickens. it's also a good idea to stir pretty frequently as i end up with crusty stuff on the bottom of my pan when i don't.
6. serve over rice or couscous.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: mberan42 on 09 Jan 2009, 15:25
3 teaspoons oil (i prefer olive... and don't use extra virgin, you silly people)

What.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 09 Jan 2009, 15:44
i caught my friend cooking with extra virgin a couple of days ago and almost knocked the bottle out of her hand. then i told another friend and she didn't get what the big deal was either so i figured it was worth mentioning. some people just do not know.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 09 Jan 2009, 17:42
What's wrong with extra virgin olive oil?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 09 Jan 2009, 17:52
unlike refined olive oil, extra virgin olive oil is cold pressed and unrefined and has a much more distinct flavour, so it is best served in cold dishes like salads or pastas or used for sauteing. when heated to high temperatures, the unrefined particles burn which causes the oil not only to taste awful but also is a terrible thing to inflict on your heart. cooking should be done with refined olive oil instead.
i do not blame people for not knowing the distinction because apparently people like rachael ray (http://forums.questionablecontent.net/index.php/topic,20223.msg735667.html#msg735667) teach people that it is okay. what the hell, rachael ray, it is not okay.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 09 Jan 2009, 18:02
That sounds really good tania, I want to try it out.

But what about other oils?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 10 Jan 2009, 07:59
oh any other oil is fine as long as it is for cooking. i just like how olive tastes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 10 Jan 2009, 09:51
So, other cold-pressed oils are fine for cooking, but olive oil is not? And it's for health reasons? And chemically processed olive oil is okay?

I call bullshit. I'm going to keep cooking with first cold pressing, extra virgin olive oil. I'm also going to keep cooking with whole olives.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 10 Jan 2009, 10:01
Extra virgin olive oil has a really low smoke point, something like 250 degrees.  And when it burns it becomes carcinogenic.  I'll find a chart about the smoke points of oils, but yeah extra virgin is bad and so are most unrefined oils.

http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/50/Smoke-Points-of-Various-Fats

Eh it is 320, but that is still really low.  Your pan easily gets a lot higher than that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 10 Jan 2009, 10:17
So, other cold-pressed oils are fine for cooking, but olive oil is not?

other oils as in other refined oils with a high smoke point, not other unrefined oils.
anyone can cook with whatever oil they want, using unrefined oil when frying just seems like a bit of a waste of good oil to me. it's pricier and has a very distinct flavour that doesn't go with a lot of food imo. i wanted to clarify the difference between extra virgin and refined olive oil mainly because the aforementioned friends didn't know there was any difference between unrefined and refined oil, they just thought all oil was the exact same to cook with and that if they bought more expensive oil it would automatically lead to better food. figuring there might be other people here who also aren't aware of the difference i felt it was worth mentioning.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 10 Jan 2009, 11:01
Oh man yeah, extra virgin olive oil tastes terrible when it gets hot. A friend of mine actually baked a cake using it, Funfetti cake with an undertone of burned olive is not a good mix at all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: orangepeas on 12 Jan 2009, 21:56
So I was messing around in the kitchen and came up with this. I love coconut milk and it adds flavour!
Coconut-Eggplant stew
Half of eggplant chopped in cubes
1/2 cup chopped carrots
2 teaspoons of ground cardamom
1 can of coconut milk
1/4 of mango juice (optional)
1/2 teaspoon of curry powder or however much you want
Half of onion chopped

Sauté the onion in an oiled pan, put in the carrots and eggplant, sauté them a bit. But in the coconut milk, caradom, curry powder and mango juice. Put a lid on it and simmer till eggplant and carrots are tender. (About 5-10 minutes)

Enjoy!

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 12 Jan 2009, 23:02
I agree with Tania, just shy away from Lampanate Olive Oil for any reason (It's a kind, not a brand). It's basically the leftover olive mush after they press the highre-grade olive oils combined with various solvents. Its extremely acidic for an olive oil (~5% if memory serves), and it's terrible.

If you really really want to cook with extra virgin without giving yourself cancer and a bad taste, mix a olive oil and another oil with a higher smoke point in a 1:5 or so ratio. The higher smoke point of the other oil should work to prevent the olive oil from burning, while stil giving it a good flavor. I haven't personally tried this with olive oil, but i usually miz a little oil with my raw butter to keep it from burning when I'm too lazy to clarify some, so it should work.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 13 Jan 2009, 13:02
I call shenanigans on the "mixing it makes it not burn thing"  I have had that shoved down my throat and to me it seems it will burn at the same temperature just it's in a lower quantity so the taste is less apparent.  But i do mix sometimes for flavor, i just think the "adding another oil will keep it from burning" thing isn't true.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 14 Jan 2009, 03:21
I don't really like cooking stir-fries with olive oil. I don't want my Asian food to taste like Mediterranean food. I prefer to use something like canola oil.

Also, if you're making a chicken stir-fry it's really nice to marinade the chicken for a while. You can make a really tasty marinade for a stir-fry by mixing fish sauce, sesame oil, rice vinegar, and palm sugar, and maybe a little bit of lime juice. After you've finished marinading the chicken, you can add the marinade to the stir-fry to flavour the vegetables, too.

Oh, and chuck some herbs in there at the end. Stir-fry is a different dish entirely with some nice fresh herbs. I'd recommend any or all of the following: mint, Vietnamese mint, and Thai basil.

All of these ingredients should be readily available in Australia, at least in the larger cities, but I don't know about elsewhere.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: öde on 14 Jan 2009, 07:45
How do I make my stir-fry crisp?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 14 Jan 2009, 11:51
Don't cook it so long and don't put any water in it
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 14 Jan 2009, 14:14
Yeah, a stir-fry should really be cooked for, like, a few minutes tops. And on very high heat. And constantly stirring it, so that things don't stick and burn. Oh, and in a wok.

That's how you make sure everything in there is crisp instead of floppy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 14 Jan 2009, 15:24
Also don't add too much of the soy, as it'll do the same thing as adding water and make it gloopy.

Also also, if you like ginger, you can add a shitload of ginger to the honey/soy/garlic stir-fry sauce mixture. This was pretty much a staple dish for the first few years of my living out of home.

That and omlettes. Mmm omlette.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Jan 2009, 13:02
This morning I started some chicken stock with the leftover bones from two chicken breasts. It got a healthy dose of yellow split peas to make up for the tiny amount of chicken, plus the standard fare of vegetables. I strained that and made chicken-barley-split pea soup with it (thickened up to a stew, really), and with the leftover veg/chicken mush from the stock, I have re-invented falafel in a strange new way. Basically, three stale whole-wheat kaisers became bread crumbs and were then processed with the mushmash, then received a fresh onion and some fresh parsley and got processed some more, before being rolled into balls. It is all now baking in my oven at 350ºF.
Soup is tasty, not sure how these chickafels will be.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 18 Jan 2009, 01:12
I have chicken stock and brown veal stock on my stove now.

Tomorrow, I'm making osso bucco alla milanese and watching the Steelers stomp the everlasting fuck out of Baltimore..

Huzzah for football and gremolata
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: spoon_of_grimbo on 19 Jan 2009, 15:33
First off, a confession. I suck at cooking. My speciality dish is usually soup a la cup, beans presented on a bed of toast, or if I'm feeling particularly lazy, microwave ready meal. So today I figured I'd try to actually cook a proper meal. It went so awesomely, I've decided to share the recipe with y'all.

"The Sausagefest"

Ingredients:
4 sausages
Jar of Bisto Cumberland Sausage & Onion Sauce (purple label)
A Granny Smith apple
A medium sized red potato
2 of those reet nice big mushrooms
Lea & Perrins Sauce
Salt & Pepper
Cooking Oil
Bit of milk
Some butter

Stuff:
A cooker (this one's pretty essential)
Frying pan
Saucepan (with lid)
Glass casserole dish
Some wooden spoons
Potato masher


First, turn on the hob, put the frying pan on it, whack in a bit of oil.  When the oil's warm and all that, put the sausages in, and turn them over every 30seconds or so.  When you're not turning the sausages, keep yourself busy by peeling the apple, and cutting half of it into tiny, tiny bits.  When the sausages are nearly done, drain any excess oil and throw in the apply-bits. Swish it all around with a wooden spoon until the apply-bits are brown.

At this point, it's important to observe Ramsay's first law of cookery.  So, take the time to call the microwave a wanker, flip the middle finger at the toaster, and tell the wooden spoon to fuck off.  If anyone asks what you're cooking, shout in their face that "it's a luxury sausage bastard, you prick!"  Done that?  Excellent, now pour the sausages and apply-bits from the pan into the casserole dish, pour the sauce over it, put the lid on, and whack it all in the oven at 180degrees.  Now, you've got a few minutes to kill, maybe eat the rest of that apple?  Go on, you've earned it!

After a few minutes, peel the potato, chop into pieces and place in the saucepan.  If you're wondering why a red potato, the lady at the market said they make the best mash.  But it's still the same colour inside, so if you can't find a red one, maybe just get a normal one and paint it red or something.  Anyway, fill the saucepan with water until it's just above the tates, and place that lot on the hob.

While the potatoes are boiling, wash and rinse the frying pan, as you'll be needing it again shortly to cook the mushrooms.  Also, after the sausage mixture's been in the oven for about 20 minutes, take it out (it should go without saying that you should use oven gloves/folded tea-towel for this, although I managed to forget this bit and rather loudly suggested that the oven might be of the sort that engages in intercourse with its mother), add a few drips of Lea & Perrins, a bit of salt and pepper, stir well, and put back into the oven.  It'll want about another 15mins.

Once the tates are boiling nicely, turn the heat down, put the lid on the saucepan, and leave to simmer for a bit.  In the meantime, rip out the stalks of the mushrooms, and put the frying pan on the hob with a blob of butter in there.  When that's melted, throw in the mushrooms (whole) and the stalky bits.  Let them brown for a couple of minutes each side, and then turn the heat down, and cover them with the lid from the saucepan so they can steam for a bit.

While the mushrooms are steaming, drain the tates, add butter and/or milk and mash them until nice and creamy.  By this time, the sausage mix ought to be about done, and you're ready to serve!  First, put all the mashed potato onto the plate and shape it into a kind of fort around the edge.  Bear in mind that all good forts have turrets.  Due to my lack of a masher, I'd used a wooden spoon, leaving lumps in the mash, giving the fort a little more structural integrity...

Drain the butter off the mushrooms, and place them on top of one another at the edge of the fort to make a little tower.  Pour the sausage mixture into the middle of the fort, and throw the mushroom stalky bits on the top of it.  Sorted!

Now, all that remains is to enjoy the hell outta eating it, and then silently dread the immensity of the washing up which lies ahead...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: supersheep on 19 Jan 2009, 15:44
I could get behind a cookbook that is written like this.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 20 Jan 2009, 15:21
Tania's stir fry is sexcellent. I added pineapple and jalapeno to make it sweeter and spicier, and a little more garlic just because, but I didn't have a wok so it was the floppy sort of stir fry. Still great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 20 Jan 2009, 17:36
the recipe i posted was sort of a messy attempt to describe what i do in the kitchen. it changes everytime cos i just sort of add things to taste and thus a lot of experimenting goes on. the main thing i wanted to share was the soy sauce + honey + garlic combination which was such a cheap and tasty discovery that i couldn't not tell anyone about it. i'm glad you enjoy it!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 22 Jan 2009, 19:01
Grilled cheese!

(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3463/3218662939_5f25a515a8.jpg?v=0)

With ricotta and Parmesan (and a slice of American!).

nom nom nom
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 22 Jan 2009, 19:24
NEEDS MOAR BACON
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 22 Jan 2009, 19:25
Well we did not have any bacon. So pfffft.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Cartilage Head on 22 Jan 2009, 19:40
 I made some pretty good falafels the other day. My thing is that I like to add extra cumin and also red pepper.

(http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c213/hey_there_fatty/Falafels.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 22 Jan 2009, 20:09
Oh man, we made italian rice balls at work today. They were delicious.

Its beef, mozzerella,  sauce, onions, garlic, and peas stuffed into a sticky rice ball, breaded, and deep-fried.

I ate 6 of them and I have a stomach ache
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ThePrettyMonster on 22 Jan 2009, 20:51
one day i shall attempt to cook and then eat all of these delicious sounding recipes
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 23 Jan 2009, 00:56
Now I have a stomach ache because I am drunk and I ordered the "hottest wings you have" at a bar known for their hot wings.

I think they managed to splice habanero DNA directly into the chicken. It was deliciously painful.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 26 Jan 2009, 20:34
not my invention - it came from the internet, i don't remember where - but here is the pasta sauce recipe i use. it takes about 2-3 hours to make so you gotta start this pretty early on in the evening. it's easy and delicious though. this makes about 3-4 servings.

pasta sauce with meatballs!

ingredients:
meatballs
1 pound (about .45 kg) lean ground beef
1 cup bread crumbs
1 tbsp dried parsley
1 tbsp grated parmesan
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1/8 tsp garlic powder
1 egg (beaten)
 
sauce
3/4 cup chopped onion
5 cloves minced garlic
1/4 cup olive oil
2 cans diced tomatoes (28 oz each)
2 tsp salt
1 tsp white sugar
1 bay leaf
1 can tomato paste (6 oz)
3/4 tsp dried basil
1/2 tsp ground black pepper

instructions:

1. combine all the meatball stuff in one big bowl. mash it around. use your (clean) hands. make sure it's mixed real well, then form them into meatballs. i think the original recipe called for 12, but they're really big so i usually make about 16 instead. totally arbitrary and up to you. put them in the fridge when you're done.
2. get a large pot or very large saucepan. set the stove to medium. put the onion, garlic, and olive oil into that pot and saute them until the onion is translucent.
3. stir in the tomatoes, salt, sugar and bay leaf.
4. reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer 90 minutes. go do something productive.
5. come back and stir in tomato paste, basil, pepper, and meatballs. i know the meatballs are raw but they will cook. it's neat.
6. cover and simmer on low heat about 30 minutes more. maybe you can use this time to clean the kitchen or make some pasta or something.
7. eat it! you're done!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 26 Jan 2009, 21:16
oh! i forgot also that i made my very first pizza from scratch on friday and it turned out so well despite the fact that i had no idea what i was doing that i'm going to share the recipe for that with you too. my friends were all really impressed but they probably shouldn't be. seriously, i am pretty stupid so if i can make a good pizza literally anybody can. this pizza also takes a while to make so start this a couple of hours before you actually plan on eating.

be warned though, this will make a MASSIVE pizza. i ended up with a 2 inch thick monstrosity. it was absolutely delicious, really soft on the inside and crunchy on the outside but also really stupidly big. unfortunately i am new to pizzas and i don't know how to adjust the recipe accordingly, if it even can be. if you're okay with a giant pizza, cool! if not, you may want to make two smaller pizzas instead.

ingredients:
2 1/4 tsp instant dry yeast
1/2 tsp brown sugar
1 1/2 cups warm water
1 tsp salt
2 tbsp olive oil
3 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
all the stuff you want to put on your pizza

instructions:
1. get a large bowl. dissolve the yeast, brown sugar, and water in that bowl and let it sit for 10 minutes. if you are new to baking, this is called proofing and basically you are checking that the yeast is active. warm water is good, hot water might kill the yeast so avoid that. if, after 10 minutes, the water is foamy and smells like bread you're ready to roll.
2. stir the salt and oil into the yeast solution, then add in 2 1/2 cups of flour. do it little by little so it doesn't fly everywhere.
3. gather up the dough onto a clean, well floured surface, and knead in more flour until the dough is no longer sticky. according to the recipe, this will need about an extra 3/4 cups of flour, but i kind of skipped out on measuring the flour for this part since it was everywhere. just have lots of flour on hand and keep kneading it in until the dough isn't sticking all over your hands anymore.
4. place the dough into a well oiled bowl and cover it with a damp cloth. let the dough rise until it doubles in size. this take about an hour so go do something productive.
5. come back in an hour. you might want to preheat your oven to 425 F (220 C) now. punch down the dough, form a tight ball, allow the dough to relax for a minute, then roll it out. again, one pizza or two, it's up to you. if you are baking the dough on a pizza stone you should (according to the recipe) put the toppings on and bake it immediately. if you are baking your pizza in a pan, oil the pan and let the dough rise for 15 or 20 minutes before topping and baking it. if you are worried about the dough being undercooked, you may want to bake it a few minutes before adding toppings, but i didn't have that problem so this is also up to you. as long as you bake it on the bottom rack it should be fine.
6. put whatever you want on your pizza.
7. bake your pizza. i have no idea how long for tbh. the recipe says 15-20 minutes but i think mine took longer than that. if you're making two smaller pizzas, switch them (one will be on the top rack and one on the bottom) about halfway through or else they'll bake unevenly. just keep an eye on your pizza. when it's golden brown and kind of looks and smells like it's done, it's done.
8. eat it! awesome!

now that i have a camera i think i should maybe start taking photos of my food, it might be helpful if anyone's actually attempting to make these recipes. next time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Cicero on 26 Jan 2009, 21:19
Tania, that sounds delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 26 Jan 2009, 21:34
it was kind of like pizza hut crust but not as drippy and greasy. i'm pretty happy with this recipe!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 27 Jan 2009, 21:56
The easiest way to control the size of your pizza is to cut the dough.  Cut the dough down into smaller pieces right before step 4 in your recipe.  Roll each individual piece of dough into a tight ball and continue as per your recipe.

If you have more dough than you know what to do with, bench it and punch it, then freeze the rest. It should keep with a minimal quality loss.

I find 18oz-20oz dough balls are the best for a 16" pie. If you don't have scales handy, the dough should be about the diamter of a CD after you roll it into a ball.

When I make pizza at home, I use a piza stone, preheated to 500F. It takes 8-10 minutes to cook at that temp with a stone, add a few minutes if you dont have a pizza stone.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Oli on 29 Jan 2009, 13:36
Talking of pizza I made an excellent chicago style deep-dish pizza the other day.

Basically you want to use Tania's recipe for the pizza dough but then instead of rolling it all into 1 big pizza base you split it into two bits - one bit has to be slightly larger so split it like 60/40.

Roll the larger bit so that it is large enough to sit at the bottom of your non-stick springform cake tin (I guess this isn't essential, but it is hella useful) with the dough running up the sides and over the edge. The trick at this bit is to keep the dough at a consistent thickness on the base, this is pretty essential because if you have weak bits they will probably break under the pressure of delicious cheesy pizza.

Now use scissors to trim the excess dough that is hanging over the side of the tin - don't get rid of it all, just even it out to about an inch excess.

Fill your new dough bowl with all manners of cheese, meats and tasty pizza noms. When I made it I put cooked spicy chicken, cheddar, a few lumps of mozarella and a dollop of tomatoey pizza sauce I made from a tin of tomatoes, some garlic, an onion and some tomato puree in there. I wouldn't use raw meats because they would probably not cook fully before the pizza crust was burning up in places.

Roll the second lump of dough so that it is just big enough to fit inside the cake tin, as a sort of lid. Once you've done this you roll the excess dough you have hanging over the edge of your cake tin into the dough lid. The two pieces of dough.

Pierce the dough lid. This is essential because you need to let steam escape from the pizza chamber that you've just made or else it might explode in your oven.

Chuck on a thin layer of pizza sauce, some more cheese, maybe some more meat - whatever you like really. I used sliced chorizo, chopped mushrooms and a load of mozarella.

Blam that mother in the middle of your pre-heated oven for 45 minutes or so at 220 C. The dough should be golden and firm throughout. The 45 minutes is really a rough guide - you need the dough to be baked properly throughout or else it'll fall apart when you cut it and you'll have incredibly tasty mess that is not really pizza. If the pizza is starting to brown top before it's ready you can do the last 10 minutes or so with tin foil covering it to try and help that.

nom nom nom.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 29 Jan 2009, 13:56
A traditional deepdish would be without the second layer of dough and have a shitton of pizza sauce.   Unless I am mistaken, which is possible.  Doing it that way you could use raw sausage in it.

But regardless that sounds delicious
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 29 Jan 2009, 17:03
There is nothing wrong with cooking your sausage and any other raw meat beforehand, especially for deep dish where it won't dry out and even on a new york style pizza its fine, so there is never any reason to use absolutely raw meat. Some places have grilled chicken breast or some jibber jabber as a topping on their new york style pizzas but stay away from that shit, it'll be dry as a bone before it finishes, chicken breast wasn't made to be a good pizza topping like that, haven't tried it in a deep dish though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 29 Jan 2009, 20:25
You could add it when you take it out, if the pizza is still hot it should stick.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LizziL on 30 Jan 2009, 02:42
I worked in a pizza joint for a pretty long time, and, pre-cooked meats are pretty standard. Much faster, so you're less likely to have raw meat and burnt cheese/crust. All of these recipes sound delicious! I wish I was out of my dorm before May so I could try some of them!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 30 Jan 2009, 18:54
I present to you... How To Make French Fries! (nom nom nom)

Slice up that potato. You can do classic french fry shapes or little cubes or whatever you want. Just try to make them all roughly the same size so they will bake evenly.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3414/3239620639_9a79fefbf5.jpg?v=0)

Toss the potato bits with some olive oil and spices of your choosing (I am partial to cayenne pepper, garlic, basil, and various others).
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3357/3240456174_7390eae3c0.jpg?v=0) (http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3479/3240455474_57d8d565fb.jpg?v=0)

Stir it all up good and watch out for clumps of seasoning!
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3132/3239618363_6db45e48d6.jpg?v=0) (http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3343/3239617673_eb7ee32f0d.jpg?v=0)

Put them in the oven to bake. I do 350 for anywhere from 45 to 75 minutes, depending on how thick I have cut the fries. Yes my oven is tiny. Shush.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3426/3239616955_308d84875d.jpg?v=0)

Aaaand PRESTO. Delicious fries that you can enjoy by themselves or with your favorite dipping sauce. What you cannot see in this photo is the blob of ranch on my plate. I am obsessed with ranch.
(http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3315/3239616025_983ca7d44c.jpg?v=0)

OM NOM NOM
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 30 Jan 2009, 19:04
Nice job Liz, they look pretty damn delicious. We should probably attempt to try and make more foods like french fries and stuff that are usually fried in that healthier, baked way. They taste delicious anyway and are far classier than just dumping some frozen bag of crinkle cuts into the vat of peanut oil for deep frying.

I also really like the last picture, so much.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Oli on 30 Jan 2009, 19:38
They look tasty as all hell but are you sure you did not use an apple accidentally?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 30 Jan 2009, 19:47
Nope! Two potatoes!

(Is it weird that part of me is now wondering what baked apple slices would taste like?)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Reed on 30 Jan 2009, 20:03
I'll have you know that I currently have a bag of potatoes sitting in my cabinet and I've had no idea what I want to do with them.


You have made my day!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Oli on 30 Jan 2009, 20:04
(the joke is that they looked like slices of apple, but baked cooking apples are pretty nice so I guess I could do a quick recipe for that. I dunno about slices though.)

Take a large cooking apple core it and slice a line through the skin all the way round it. The line slicing is important because apples can explode.

Put lotsa raisins and demerara sugar (maybe even some cinnamon or other spices. Go nuts!*) inside it, place the apple in a baking dish and splash a little bit of water over it.

Bake in the oven at 180 oC or so until the apple is starting to brown on the outside (25-30 minutes, but keep checking it because you don't want that shit burnt), it should come out fairly smooshy but still intact.

Serve with whipped cream.

*I have heard that some nuts work really well in baked apples, but I've never tried it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: thegreatbuddha on 30 Jan 2009, 23:07
I like saving the fat from ribeyes/bacon./etc and using it to poach my french fries in before I actually fry them.

Heat the fat to 200F, drop the fries in for 45 seconds or so, and drain and cool. Then later, pop them in a 350F deep fryer filled with oil, cook until crispy, and enjoy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 01 Feb 2009, 02:07
This is the recipe for a beef and vegetable stew that my grandfather makes. I tried it for the first time on my own today, and it came out pretty smashingly. Very hearty.

Here are the things that you will need, ostensibly -

3 ¼ lb. Beef short ribs, cut crosswise
3 tps. Salt
10 whole black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
2 celery stalks, with green tops, cut-up
1 large onion, quartered
3 parsley sprigs
1 large can (28 oz.) tomatoes ( be sure the can doesn’t have seasoning like garlic, etc.)
1 ½ cups cut-up,pared red Irish potatoes
¾  cup cut-up,pared carrots
¼ tps. dried tarragon leaves
¼ tps. curry powder
1 can of sweet peas
1 cup shredded cabbage
1 can red kidney beans
1 cup pasta, give or take a cup depending on preference (I prefer shell macaroni, but you go wild with whatever)

Here is what you will do with these things
1. In large pot, combine beef ribs, 2 tps. salt, peppers, bay leaf, celery, onion, parsley and 1 ½ qts. water. Bring to boiling, reduce heat and simmer, covered, 1 hour and 45 minutes. I use this time to bake cookies or go on a 5k run and work out, whichever strikes me as more fun at the moment. You could also watch television, or something.
2. Remove beef ribs from the pot. The meat should be browned and reduced significantly. What you do now depends on where the rib fat is. If it's still stuck to the ribs (as it was for me today) then cut or pull the meat from it and dispose of it along with the bones (if your meat's well cooked it will just slide right off the bone, with a little coaxing). If there aren't big, gross-looking fat deposits on the meat then congratulations, it's in the stock. Take the pot off of the heat and let it cool, such that the fat condenses on top of the fluid. Scoop / bast it out.
3. In your pot, combine the newly created beef stock, the pulled beef, tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, tarragon, curry powder, and rest of salt. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, covered, 20 minutes or until potatoes and carrots are almost tender. At my rocky mountain altitude this took more like 25 minutes.
4. Add peas, beans, cabbage and pasta and simmer covered 10 minutes or until peas and cabbage are tender. Depending on the amount of pasta you might want to add to this time.

and then you eat it. It should yield enough for 2 sizable meals for 2 people. Make it just for yourself and you're well fed for awhile.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 10 Feb 2009, 16:46
I just realized I never posted my vegetarian chili recipe. It's simple, quick, cheap and pretty good!

1 onion, thinly sliced
1/2 green bell pepper, diced
2 tablespoons butter or margarine (or vegetable oil, for the pot)
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons chili powder
1 can of whole tomatoes, crushed (use diced if you don't want to chop them up yourself)
1 can corn
1 can beans (kidney or black, I prefer kidney)
1 1/2 cups shredded cheese (I discourage using strong cheddar)
As much brown rice as you please
1/2 cup green onions, chopped (optional)
salt / pepper to taste

(1) Start the rice, since it will take awhile. At this altitude it takes 45 minutes to produce 3 cups of brown rice, so I usually let that simmer for about 20 minutes before getting on to step 2, thus ensuring that the rice is fresh by the time the rest of the chili is ready.
(2) Saute onion and pepper in butter until tender but not brown. (actually, I like to caramelize the onions myself.)
(3) Stir in garlic until cooked (less than a minute, as it'll burn pretty fast)
(4) Add tomatoes and beans and stir in the chili powder, season with salt / pepper as much as needed. Simmer 10 minutes, adding the corn about halfway in as to avoid overcooking. remember not to drain the cans, but throw everything in there. Break up the tomatoes with your spoon / spatula once they're softened by the heat (if you're using the whole tomatoes)
(5) Stir in rice (you can also pour the chili over the rice, but I add the rice into the chili to create a mixture) add cheese as desired, stirring to distribute.
(6) Serve.

Be aware that as this recipe uses cheese, by making it you will become complicit in bovine slavery and thus are not a good vegan, if you proclaim yourself to be one. Oppression has a mild flavor that offsets the chili powder nicely.

Here it is at stage 4
(http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/2294/img1399wv6.jpg)

Here it is at stage 6
(http://img18.imageshack.us/img18/1724/img1401ch3.jpg)

It'll feed a few people and it costs just about $3-6, depending on what stuff you already have.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 10 Feb 2009, 19:14
Oppression has a mild flavor that offsets the chili powder nicely.

i will make your delicious looking recipe just for this
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Darkbluerabbit on 10 Feb 2009, 19:45
I am feeling under the weather.  It really sucks, but it inspired me to make Misoshiru.  Yummy and supposedly good for getting over sickness.  I cobbled this together from a few different recipes.

It was made of:

4-5 cloves of garlic, minced
Ginger, a piece a little smaller than a thumb, peeled and minced
1 1/2 Tbsp. Oil
A smallish red onion, sliced
A leaf or two of kale, ripped to bits  (a cup or so)
1/2 a block of firm tofu, cut into little cubes
6 shitake mushrooms, stems removed and sliced
3 cups vegetable broth and 5 cups of water
2 Tbsp. Tamari
3 Tbsp. Red miso paste

Preparation is pretty simple.  Sautee the garlic and ginger in a big pot for thirty seconds or so, then add the onions and kale.  Stir it around for a minute or so, then add tofu.  Stir it around a little more.  Then stir occasionally for another minute or two.  Onions should be translucent and kale will darken.  Stir in the mushrooms, until they start to sweat.  Pour in liquids.  Bring to a simmer and let it do its thing for five minutes or so.  While waiting, get a small bowl and put the miso and tamari in it.  From your soup, take a spoonful or two of broth and pour it over the miso.  Stir it up so you have a miso/tamari/broth liquid.  Remove soup pot from heat, and let it chill out for thirty seconds or so.  Then stir in the miso mixture.  It is important that the soup is not boiling when you add the miso, because heat kills the good enzymes and shit. 

Soup is ready to be served! 

(http://i131.photobucket.com/albums/p316/darkbluerabbit/Misoshiru003.jpg)
Serving suggestion, box of tissues not required.

This soup reheats well, provided it is not allowed to boil.  I will enjoy it over the next couple of days while I sniffle pathetically.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 10 Feb 2009, 20:15
I had a dinner party tonight. The food and the company were both fantastic.

First there were crabcakes and a salad of field greens and cherry tomatoes with balsamic vinegar, then a thick, creamy, pureed butternut squash soup. Next we had salmon croquettes, some with capers and onions mixed in, some with just egg, cracker, lemon, and salt. There was a citrus aioli with those, and also mashed potatoes.

For dessert we had baked pears with a chocolate sauce and vanilla ice cream.

It was so so yummy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jace on 10 Feb 2009, 20:24
Okay internet, you win, I am going to talk to my parents about getting some of the old cookware and I am going to start making food instead of buying it all the time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: St.Germain on 10 Feb 2009, 22:25
So for Valentine's Day, I'm making dinner. Fetticine Alfredo, from scratch. By 'scratch', I mean I'm making everything. I made the homemade pasta the other day and froze it. This will accompanied by bread that has roasted red peppers and mozzerella in it.

It should be amazing. I can post the recipes if anyone is interested. It's all vegetarian, too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Krina on 11 Feb 2009, 12:45
Yes plz. I always make pasta with saoce from a jar and feel like mixing it up a little.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 16 Feb 2009, 21:59
I cooked a sweet potato today. I have always thought I hated sweet potato. I was wrong. I simply never had it where it wasn't drowned in butter and brown sugar. I baked it and drizzled olive oil in it and suddenly it was not only edible, but quite nice :)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 16 Feb 2009, 23:24
Over the weekend, I made two pies from this recipe (http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Strawberry-Pie-II/Detail.aspx) with the first pie crust on this page (http://www.elise.com/recipes/archives/001127perfect_pie_crust.php), but I added a bunch of blueberries and put in about 1 1/4 cup of sugar for both pies, rather than 2 cups of sugar.  I also put in less water (I think I used just barely over a cup, total) and more cornstarch (about 5 tablespoons total), because people had complained in the comments that it took forever to set and ended up being really watery anyway.  It was a good call, I think, because my pie had set perfectly after a few hours in the fridge.  Plus, the filling filled up both my pies, even without all that extra water and sugar.  I don't have a masher (I used a fork) and I placed my strawberries haphazardly in the shell, so it's not as pretty as the recipe picture.  But it was certainly tasty.

I gave one of the pies to my upstairs neighbors so that I wouldn't gain five pounds in pie fat just this weekend.  Here's mine:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/NvrTooMuchPython/IMG_0010.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Feb 2009, 09:08
Cool! I think the water in that recipe is probably excessive like the comments said, three quarter cups sounds a bit much. I like to avoid diluting fillings too much, so I'd use just enough water so that you can whisk the cornstarch well so it doesn't clump when it hits the strawberries and heat.
Also, to make strawberries (or any fruit) easier to mash, you can toss them with the sugar and let them sit for half an hour; the sugar softens them and they'll release a lot of their fluid, making them easier to manhandle. And if you are not going to arrange them fancy-like, I find it is more sensible to make the strawberries smaller because that makes em easier to eat and they work better with the mayhem approach of placement.

(I think a lot about pies)
(looks tasty)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 Feb 2009, 14:22
Tomorrow I am having a dinner party too!

I will post photos of all the foods and it will be awesome.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 17 Feb 2009, 17:50
(I think a lot about pies)

These thoughts are not wasted. You can be the baker at the QC restaurant.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: St.Germain on 18 Feb 2009, 22:58
Ok, here's part of my Valentine's Day meal. I don't feel like typing out everything right now, but an interest in sauce was expressed, so we'll start with that.

Fettuccini Alfredo

4 cups fettuccini (mine was homemade, but use whatever you have access to)
1/4 cup whipping cream
3/4 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese
1/2 lb. (2 sticks) soft butter
1 egg yolk, beaten
white pepper

Cook fettuccini in 4 quatrs water and 1 tsp. salt 14-18 minutes (less if it's fresh pasta), drain. In same pan, add butter and toss with fettuccini. Combine cream and egg yolk (in a separate container, I missed this). Alternate adding 1/3 of the cream/egg mix with 1/3 of the cheese. Toss well but gently after addition. Add pepper to taste and serve immediately.


It was quite tasty, but I had less than 4 cups of pasta, so there was lots of extra sauce. That is what bread is for, soaking up excess sauce. Be warned, it gets a little funny if you microwave leftovers, the butter separates out a bit, so you have to stir it back in. Maybe it was because I used margarine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 18 Feb 2009, 23:01

(I think a lot about piss)
This is what I read.

What is up with this thread anyway.

I'm eating chicken marsala over burned vermicelli and rice. mmmmm.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ledhendrix on 19 Feb 2009, 03:17
My flatmate bought a bunch of blueberries and then decided he didn't like them. Blueberry pancakes for breakfast is pretty awesome. Just make up the pancake mixture, toss a couple in and that's it. So easy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gilead on 19 Feb 2009, 04:53
Be warned, it gets a little funny if you microwave leftovers, the butter separates out a bit, so you have to stir it back in. Maybe it was because I used margarine.
This is the worst part about cream sauces, they're so heavy so sometimes you don't wanna finish them, but you can't really do leftovers because they go gross.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 19 Feb 2009, 12:54
I always make a roux when I'm cooking Fettuccine Alfredo, which then more or less consists of butter, flour, milk, parmesan, salt and pepper. But your recipe sounds interesting.

Wikipedia has helped me. A roux with scalded milk added is called a Béchamel sauce, which with added grated cheese is called a Mornay sauce, so that's basically what mine is.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 19 Feb 2009, 14:57
Flour in alfredo? All you need is heavy cream, and parmesan grated really fine, and salt and pepper, and you're tehre :)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: St.Germain on 20 Feb 2009, 00:21
I usually make a roux with parmasan, garlic, and italian seasoning when I'm making casual pasta. I had just decided to try something different using an actual recipe instead of something I made up. Turns out making it up tends to work better.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Darkbluerabbit on 20 Feb 2009, 00:48
I've found that too.  Nine out of ten times that I tried to actually follow a recipe, I found myself thinking "hmm, this would probably be better without this/with more of this/less of this/etc."  I generally look at a recipe for inspiration, then just make something up based on what I like and what is on sale.  It's probably good that I don't do a lot of baking, because that requires some chemistry and can be spectacularly fucked up moreso than a soup or sauteed dish.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Rolling20s on 20 Feb 2009, 11:47
I cook on a fairly regular basis, and really enjoy it when I do. Last night I made some salsa from canned tomatoes, an onion, canned jalapenos, garlic and spices. Then I pan-fired some Tilapia that I'd blackened, and served all of that with rice and nacho chips. Delicimous! I ate the rest of the salsa this. I mixed it with some fried potatoes and some fried egg. More nacho chips for that mix, too.

We're planning to plant a really large garden this year, so we'll be able to use fresh ingredients more readily in a few months. Much prefer that to canned, but it's hard to argue with a large jar of sliced jalapenos for cheap.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 21 Feb 2009, 06:40
Quote
Fettuccini Alfredo

-snip-

For being so simple this was suprisingly tasty. Needs a bit of spice, perhaps, maybe another type of cheese added in, but other than that I was impressed.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Rolling20s on 23 Feb 2009, 12:33
My wife baked scones!

(http://lh4.ggpht.com/_JoEIMshtSBQ/SaMF5YUDOsI/AAAAAAAAB4s/14LtJpLVUQk/s400/100_2769.JPG)

Proto-scones

(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_JoEIMshtSBQ/SaMF8L9x59I/AAAAAAAAB40/ilvQOBse_ek/s400/100_2770.JPG)
(http://lh5.ggpht.com/_JoEIMshtSBQ/SaMF-7BmVoI/AAAAAAAAB48/fnnedh8yN20/s400/100_2771.JPG)

Some had cappuccino chips, some had chocolate chips.

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_JoEIMshtSBQ/SaMGMAzDlyI/AAAAAAAAB5s/_JQUR5za6fM/s400/100_2786.JPG)
(http://lh6.ggpht.com/_JoEIMshtSBQ/SaMGOdcls4I/AAAAAAAAB50/SbaiFEXffSk/s400/100_2787.JPG)

Cappuccino chops make them into cakes. Chocolate chip ones look like regular scones.

(http://lh3.ggpht.com/_JoEIMshtSBQ/SaMGQRea34I/AAAAAAAAB6A/IHZ7es8HsAE/s400/100_2789.JPG)

Breakfast!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 23 Feb 2009, 20:48
okay you guys. I'm confused about roux now. All I know is from cajun cooking. I roux is supposed to be equal parts oil and flour, cooked at a high heat to whatever color you like. Yo uguys are describing it in a way that doesn't sound like what I mean when I say roux...Can ya'll clarify for me? :oops:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: St.Germain on 24 Feb 2009, 02:18
I'm probably using the term wrong, so you're probably right.

What I mean is a mix of melted butter and flour, which is all heated and stirred up, and then some milk and tasty things are added to make sauce. So yeah, I'm bastardizing the term "roux".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 24 Feb 2009, 03:26
Yes, the roux is the first stage in making a sauce properly.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 24 Feb 2009, 03:40
Yeah, a roux for French cooking is butter and flour, Cajun cooking is usually with oil instead. A Cajun roux is usually cooked longer so you get a much darker roux and butter just can't take the heat and will burn, so oil is used instead.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: evernew on 24 Feb 2009, 03:40
I'm probably using the term wrong, so you're probably right.

What I mean is a mix of melted butter and flour, which is all heated and stirred up, and then some milk and tasty things are added to make sauce. So yeah, I'm bastardizing the term "roux".

That's Mehlschwitze.
It is made of delish and you can put pretty much everything in there.
For added yummy, replace some of the milk with cream and cheese.
Definitely put nutmeg in there.
(I really like putting in some curry when making basic  carbonara with cooked ham. But it works with all tasty meats and most seafood too.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jace on 24 Feb 2009, 09:05
Made some pancakes this morning.
First time I've ever cooked in this apartment. (only lived here since July)
They were fantastic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 24 Feb 2009, 12:11
This makes more sense--butter and flour is indeed a roux (basically it's ANY fat and a like amount of flour depending on what you are trying for. But once you add to that it's no longer a roux, and the alfredo description was indeed, not a roux :p Alfredo is alfredo. I just started to panic a little with all the roux talk.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jace on 24 Feb 2009, 12:43
Oh hey guys, I've also got cookies that my mom and I made.

Here's my version of the recipe. Everything works the same I just make it sound better.

Some Goddamned No Bake cookies
2c Sugar
1/4c Cocoa
1/2c Butter
1/2c Milk
pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
3c oatmeal

Mix together all that shit except for the oatmeal and vanilla in a pot. Get that shit boiling. Now you let it boil for 3 minutes, and only 3 damn minutes, alright, that is why these cookies are so quick. Mix in the vanilla. Now take it off of the stove and combine it with the oatmeal. Mix it up nice. Count to 60 while it sits and starts to solidify a bit. Drop that shit on cookie sheets in little balls or shapes or something. Put it in the freezer and let them chill, this is a good time for you to clean the pan and other stuff. Enjoy the shit out of these goddamn cookies.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Darkbluerabbit on 24 Feb 2009, 18:30
I made green curry for the first time today, and learned a few things.  The first is that light coconut milk is worthless.  It was on clearance, and I'm cheap, so I decided to try it.  I didn't expect it to be great, but I'm pretty sure they just thinned it with water.  The second thing is that Thai Kitchen curry paste is weak.  It's fine taste wise, but not nearly as hot as it should be.  If you want to make green curry but don't like really hot stuff, I would recommend it.

Overall it turned out pretty okay, but it could have been better.  I was pleased with substituting chunks of zucchini for Thai eggplant, which I read can be done if you can't find the appropriate veggie but still want something of similar size and texture.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Guido Sarducci on 24 Feb 2009, 19:49
Oh hey guys, I've also got cookies that my mom and I made.

Here's my version of the recipe. Everything works the same I just make it sound better.

Goddamnedshitshitdamnshitshit

fuck yeah! :laugh:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 25 Feb 2009, 10:31
Hi cooking people. You make me hungry.

On a semi-related note, the dining commons served chillaquiles(sp?) for breakfast this morning. I don't know what I just ate but it was so good. Does anyone have a way I could try to do this for myself? I am a cooking newbie but I would really like to try.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Genbot2500 on 25 Feb 2009, 11:56
I today.. Made a bread pudding.. which looked god awful, but tasted good and is a solid way to get rid of leftover bread  :-D.. And a lamb tagine. It was good
Anybody of you know panacotta? It's an Italian dessert that is made out of almost nothing but cream. But it's sooo good
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jace on 02 Mar 2009, 17:45
Currently making some of liz's potato fries, I will be accompanying them with a burger that Edith told me how to cook (since I do not know how to cook burgers without a grill).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 02 Mar 2009, 19:01
Today I made choc-caramel fudge and gingerbread men for my mummah to take to school with her tomorrow. I still need to make the icing for the gingerbread, but after that I will take photos and show them off.

The fudge recipe is ridiculously easy and it tastes so good that every time I make some people ask me for the recipe. The gingerbread recipe I got from out lunchy's cooking blog and have used before. I think I didn't put enough ginger in it, though, which is a bit of a downer, but then again I won't be eating them! Tonight I will cook some chicken and mushroom stuff and have it with rice. It looks pretty awful when it is being made, but is really quite tasty. Cookiiiiing!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 11 Mar 2009, 08:49
Hi cooking people. You make me hungry.

On a semi-related note, the dining commons served chillaquiles(sp?) for breakfast this morning. I don't know what I just ate but it was so good. Does anyone have a way I could try to do this for myself? I am a cooking newbie but I would really like to try.

It's sort of like scrambled eggs over tortilla chips with beans and sauce and cheese all fried up? It's actually a little more than that though, I just can't explain it any better than that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 11 Mar 2009, 21:25
Sam, guess what I had for breakfast one day when I was in Buda, Texas over Christmas?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 12 Mar 2009, 07:39
Dick?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 12 Mar 2009, 07:40
(always a safe bet)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 12 Mar 2009, 09:55
No no, Sam actually wasn't in town that weekend so there's no way that could be the answer. Good guess!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gilead on 11 Apr 2009, 03:29
Oh my shit, look guys, I appear to have baked something all by myself.
(http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b171/CatFishEnFuego/croissants1.jpg)

(http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b171/CatFishEnFuego/croissants2.jpg)
Mmm they look pretty delicious on their own, but what's this inside?

(http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b171/CatFishEnFuego/croissants3.jpg)
Fuck yes. That's right bitches, home made chocolate croissants.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Thomas Edison on 30 Jul 2009, 06:54
Right then bitches, let's have a little bit of thread necro, eh? Lately, I've been living like a student without actually being one. This means simple, tastyish meals which are quick and tastyish.

Get ready for some bandwith fucking.


Right people, first things first, get a kitchen. Here is a prime example of a kitchen:

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01460.jpg)

Next up, blast out some cooking music through iTunes or another cool kid approved media player. My weapon of choice is some Starfucker.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01463.jpg)

Hell Yeah.

Next up, put that bitching kettle on.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01462.jpg)


Now that that water is all boiled and shit, put it in a pan.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01467.jpg)

And turn that stove on like your prom date (except no backstreet abortion is necessary here!)

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01469.jpg)


Now, you don't have to be specific, but I find 65g of wholegrain rice to be enough for me.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01471.jpg)

Bam.


And when the water looks like this:

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01472.jpg)

Pour that rice in there. Bitch won't know what hit it.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01474.jpg)

Now, as you can see, I have a prime collection of mackeral here. I'm only using mackeral because fish is fucking delicious. To be honest, you can top this dish with any shit. Just make sure it's saucy, otherwise you'll get hench drymouth. Plus sauce is always awesome.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01476.jpg)

I'm also gonna slap some cheese in on this business. I'm going with Tescos own 'Mexican Pepper and Jalapeno Cheese', as modelled by Akaya the Magnificent.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01478.jpg)

You gotta' test that rice (unless you're an experience rice boiler).

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01482.jpg)

Now it's not quite ready yet, so here's a tour of my Bitchin' Kitchen.


Here's the dishes.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01484.jpg)

Here's a rabbit.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01485.jpg)

Here's an Aussie Rules Ball.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01486.jpg)

Oh shit the rice

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01475.jpg)

Get a sieve.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01489.jpg)

Sieve that rice.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01491.jpg)

Awh yeah.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01492.jpg)

Slap that cheese on whilst the rice is still hot, man.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01493.jpg)

That shit is better melted.

Now open that fish up.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01494.jpg)

Don't tell me that shit doesn't look appetizing. I bet your salivating just looking at it, you fish hussy you.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01495.jpg)

Mmm, look at that spicy tomato sauce.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01496.jpg)

Tip that shit out.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01497.jpg)

And bam, there goes the fish.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01498.jpg)

Oh yeah, doesn't that shit look awesome? Don't you just wanna grab a spoon and drive it through your monitor?


Well, pick your weapon, man.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01500.jpg)

Personally, I'd pick this thing.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01503.jpg)

Looks like Jimmy Neutron but...

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01504.jpg)

BAM! That shit's a spoon.


I'm gonna' go with a normal spoon though, because my parents think I'm weird enough taking pictures whilst I eat.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01505.jpg)

I'll slap on some Top Gear on Dave.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01508.jpg)

And bam, food's gone.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01510.jpg)

And looks how satisfied that left me.

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01520.jpg)


Until next time, folks. :D


(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/DSC01522.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 30 Jul 2009, 09:39
How long do you boil rice before straining it? Is it minute rice or something? I've never heard of making rice like noodles. I bring the water to a boil, add rice and boil 5 minutes, cover and let simmer on low heat 20-25 minutes. The water-to-rice ratio is very important because I don't strain my rice, it just absorbs all the water while simmering, so if there's too much or too little water, the rice will come out either hard or mushy. Your rice intrigues me, Thomas Edison!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: supersheep on 30 Jul 2009, 11:34
I think that is how you are supposed to cook rice, with measuring of waters and simmering and whatnot. I just go with the Edison Method. It's easier than faffing about with jugs and whatnot, especially if there are no jugs.

Also, I am entirely behind this manner of discussing cookamajigs. Indeed, I think I shall do a series on baking when I locate a camera.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Thomas Edison on 30 Jul 2009, 17:58
How long do you boil rice before straining it? Is it minute rice or something?

The rice in question is "Uncle Ben's Wholegrain Rice", packaging shown here (with a zoom in for sight impaired!).

(http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk176/rennidan/rice.png)

It's the way I've been brought up to cook. Here in Durrington-on-Sea, we have difficulty with ratios and stuff. So we just throw the rice in for ten minutes and test it to see if it's edible. We're not picky eaters here.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: IronOxide on 30 Jul 2009, 20:09
Today I made something of a "Meatball Burger". No pics, sorry, but here's the gist.

I didn't feel like getting dressed by lunchtime to make burgers. This presents two problems:

1. I can't go outside naked, as we are renewing our lease right now, and I would like to have somewhere to live.
2. OMG SPLATTERING MEAT DEATH.

So, I think to myself, perhaps I can simulate both frying and grilling this tasty treat in a way that will cook a thick burger all the way through.


THE METHOD:
I coated the bottom of a shallow pan thoroughly with olive oil, and cover it with a suspiciously well-fitting lid from another pot set (it actually formed a vacuum on the first two I made, and I had to pry it open with an old serving fork). I took some 80-20 Ground beef, and mixed in some finely shredded flat leaf parsley (which, by the way is a great flavor for pretty much everything), along with more garlic than I usually put into a burger. (I wish I had some bread crumbs, next time I try this, maybe I'll beat an egg and some bread crumbs into the meat

Turned out pretty good: The real reason for this post. When cooking, I happened about some curry powder that my brother recently purchased. Seeing that ground beef is about the only meat I can count on having in this house, I got to thinking.

CURRIED SLOPPY JOES: GOOD IDEA OR GREAT IDEA? (I will probably take photos of this when I make it)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Janvs on 31 Jul 2009, 08:20
Last night my roomates and I made a Greek meal of sorts, including keftedes (Greek meatballs) tzatziki, and a fresh tomato salad. But since my roomates are puny WOMEN, much of it went uneaten.

So this morning I made an omelet. Three eggs with crumbled keftedes in the middle, feta cheese and tzatziki on top. I would have taken a picture but I ate it so fast that there is some debate as to whether it actually existed. It was delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Dimmukane on 31 Jul 2009, 11:01
I'm not sure if this is the appropriate place to ask this...but how much 'herb' would you need if you're only making a small amount of cookies/brownies for two people?  Likewise, does anyone have any good recipes for it?  I know there are tons out there already, but I figure some of you might have better ones.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Thomas Edison on 31 Jul 2009, 11:50
How are you looking at making these herby cookies/brownies? Easiest way is to make some green butter. Now, there are loads of ways to make this, but I go for simple and sweet.

I would try for a tenbag for just two people, but it's always an iffy subject. You just get some butter simmering, slap the herb in there, don't let it boil, stir stir stir, keep checking it, leave it for about 20-25 minutes then slap it in the fridge for an hour or two. Then just follow a normal cookie recipe, substituting the butter for your green marmalede. But if you don't think a tenbag will be enough, get an eighth, use 3/4 of that, I guess.

Question: Are we actually allowed to talk about drug food on here?

EDIT: Wait, I realized, a better way of saying all that would be to say use 3-4 joints worth in the butter.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: J-cob9000 on 31 Jul 2009, 16:38
Today I stuck some waffles in the toaster and then slapped some butter on them and then cut them up and put syrup on them and those fuckers.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 31 Jul 2009, 19:18
Thomas Edison I have very, very, rarely seen food that looks less appetizing than the meal in those pictures. Also, all you did was make rice. How is that cooking?


I had Duck Breast in a Raspberry Cassis sauce with Bacon Wrapped White Asparagus and Whole Roasted Pearl Onions with Garlic for dinner the other night. The cool thing about the duck breast was that after frying it to cook it most of the way you put it under a broiler for like a minute so the brown sugar/cinnamon dry rub caramelizes and you get an awesome sweet crust underneath the sauce.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: McTaggart on 01 Aug 2009, 03:06
How long do you boil rice before straining it? Is it minute rice or something? I've never heard of making rice like noodles. I bring the water to a boil, add rice and boil 5 minutes, cover and let simmer on low heat 20-25 minutes. The water-to-rice ratio is very important because I don't strain my rice, it just absorbs all the water while simmering, so if there's too much or too little water, the rice will come out either hard or mushy. Your rice intrigues me, Thomas Edison!

I do my rice from cold water. Put the rice in the pot and add water until it's a little under an inch over the top of the rice (for a cup or a cup and a half of rice, in a pot that's maybe 20cm across), bring to the boil and then turn the heat down to a simmer and cover for ten or a bit minutes, then turn the heat off and let it stand for ten fifteen minutes. I like to do most of the absorption while it's standing rather than over heat so you don't end up baking the rice at the bottom to the pot.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 01 Aug 2009, 05:31
I use an electric rice cooker, where I fill the water to the line that has the number next to it that corresponds to the number of cups of rice I have put in (line with "2" for 2 cups of rice, etc.) and flip the switch and it does it all for me. Fuck Yeah perfect rice every time.

Now I just need to eat more rice.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 01 Aug 2009, 05:57
I use the "boil in a bag" method whenever I eat rice, which isn't very often.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Thomas Edison on 01 Aug 2009, 14:07
Also, all you did was make rice. How is that cooking?

What I did was make art, you philistine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 01 Aug 2009, 15:35
Nope, guess again.

Also, how the hell do you boil rice in a bag?

These things all sound like culinary atrocities.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Joseph on 01 Aug 2009, 16:12
Hey Keif throw up the recipe you used for your dinner because that sounds awesome.

I'd definitely eat it.  Unlike that first thing in this page which seriously looks terrible.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 03 Aug 2009, 18:01
my old roomie from guelph came over today and we made a pie! just like old times! it was pumpkin cream cheese and it rocked.

(http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/5753/pie1.png)

i didn't have a 9-inch pie plate and used a 12-inch instead with the result that the pie came out a little thin and flat but dang if it still isn't one of the most delicious heart attacks i've ever eaten. i think there's a baking thread somewhere in the arts & crafts subforum but i never check that so screw it, the recipe's going here.

THE PIE CRUST:

5 tbsp cold unsalted butter
3 tbsp cold vegetable shortening
1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
1 tbsp sugar
1/4 tsp salt
4 tbsp ice water

1. cut the butter and vegetable shortening into 3/4 inch pieces
2. in a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt and stir to mix
3. add butter and shorten­ing pieces over the flour mixture and using a pastry blender or two knives, cut in the butter and short­ening until the mixture forms large, coarse crumbs the size of large peas
4. slowly add ice water and toss with the fork until the dough is evenly moist and begins to come together in a mass but does not form a ball
5. transfer dough to floured work surface and shape the dough into a 6-inch disc
6. wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate until well chilled, at least one hour

THE PIE:

1 pie crust

1 8-ounce package cream cheese, softened
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 egg

1 1/4 cups canned pumpkin
1 cup evaporated milk
2 eggs
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg

1/2 cup chopped pecans
2 tbsp all-purpose flour
2 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp butter, softened

1. preheat oven to 350F
2. prepare and roll out pastry, line 9 inch pie plate with the pastry, trim and crimp edge as desired, set aside
3. in small mixing bowl beat cream cheese, 1/4 cup granulated sugar, vanilla, and egg with electric mixer on low to medium speed until smooth, chill in refrigerator for 30 minutes, then spoon into pastry-lined pie plate
4. in medium mixing bowl combine pumpkin, evaporated milk, 2 eggs, 1/4 cup granulated sugar, 1/4 cup brown sugar, cinnamon, salt, and nutmeg, carefully pour over cream cheese mixture
5. cover edge of the pie with foil, bake for 25 minutes
6. remove foil, bake for 25 minutes more
7. combine the pecans, flour, the 2 tablespoons brown sugar, and butter, sprinkle over pie, bake for 10 to 15 minutes more or until a knife inserted near the center comes out clean
8. cool for 1-2 hours on a wire rack, refrigerate within 2 hours, cover for longer storage

that's it! no conclusion! everybody bake some pies!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 03 Aug 2009, 22:52
Recently, I made these cupcakes. Delicious does not begin to describe them.

http://www.peterandrewryan.com/baking/2009/03/chocolate-cupcakes-with-banana-cream-cheese-frosting/#more-1668


Chocolate Cupcakes with Banana Cream Cheese frosting

cupcakes
12 Tbsp (1 1/2 sticks) butter, at room temperature
2/3 cup sugar
2/3 cup brown sugar, packed
2 large eggs, at room temperature
2 tsp vanilla
1 cup buttermilk, shaken, at room temperature
1/2 cup sour cream, at room temperature
2 Tbsp brewed coffee
1 3/4 cups flour
1 cup cocoa powder
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp kosher salt

banana icing(When I made these, I said fuck it about the food coloring. What the fuck is the color of it gonna do to the taste? Nothing. Fuck that noise)
4 oz cream cheese, room temperature
1 Tbsp butter, room temperature
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar
3 small ripe bananas, mashed
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
yellow food coloring (amount may vary, add drops until you’re satisfied)(Unless you are a douche* and need the frosting to be yellow.)

1. make the cupcakes: in an electric mixer (or in a large bowl with a spoon), cream the butter and 2 sugars until light and fluffy. add the eggs 1 at a time, then add the vanilla and mix well. in a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, sour cream, and coffee. in another bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa, baking soda, and salt. add the buttermilk mixture and the flour mixture alternately in thirds to the mixer bowl, beginning with the buttermilk mixture and ending with the flour mixture. mix only until blended. fold the batter with a rubber spatula to be sure it’s completely blended.

2. preheat the oven to 350F. line cupcake pans with paper liners.

3. divide the batter among the cupcake pans (1 rounded standard ice cream scoop per cup is the right amount). bake in the middle of the oven for 20 to 25 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. cool for 10 minutes, remove from the pans, and allow to cool completely before frosting.

4. make the icing: in an electric mixer (or in large bowl with a spoon), mix all of the icing ingredients until well blended and smooth. if the icing is too runny, add a bit more cream cheese and confectioner’s sugar until it thickens. spread on the cupcakes while at room temperature.




*I actually think this Pete guy is pretty cool, and not a douche.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 05 Aug 2009, 17:29
I am double posting because I am needy and I want something from you bakers.

BREAD RECIPES.


I want to bake some bread, damnit. Machine recipes not required, but I do have access to one if you have a particularlly good recipe.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Sox on 05 Aug 2009, 17:37
bake bread with lumps of cheese in it. like when you do chocolate chip cookies, but with cheese and in bread.
then you can make a cheese sandwich with it right before bed!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: phooey on 05 Aug 2009, 17:41
Eating before bed causes nightmares which in turn cause the mental instability to think that cheese-lump-bread is a good idea. 

I'm sorry I don't have any recipes, as at current I am quite far away from my breadmaker, for which I don't have a lot of good recipes anyway.  I do have a really excellent pizza dough recipe though, and I could put that up if anyone wants it as soon as I can.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 05 Aug 2009, 17:43
Emaline I love making this bread (http://www.recipezaar.com/Traditional-Irish-Soda-Bread-21950), because it is just mix & bake and is fantastic with soup or stew. I skip the currants and generally don't do the glaze, but it's just good either way.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 05 Aug 2009, 17:44
I'm down. Basically, now I have easy access to all kinds of crazy food stuffs(what the hell would you use a canned whole squid in squid ink for??) I am hella cooking.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: phooey on 05 Aug 2009, 17:46
I've usually seen squid ink in pasta accompanied by fried bits of squid.  The noodles look really cool with squid ink in them.

ETA: Or you could put it in someone's bathtub and really freak them out

ADDENDUM: Or maybe toilet?  Which would be weirder?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: supersheep on 05 Aug 2009, 18:28
Emaline I love making this bread (http://www.recipezaar.com/Traditional-Irish-Soda-Bread-21950), because it is just mix & bake and is fantastic with soup or stew. I skip the currants and generally don't do the glaze, but it's just good either way.

Good plan. Soda bread is not meant to have raisins in or be shiny on top. It is a simple food, for simple folk. Cover it in enough butter to cause a heart attack and brew a nice cuppa, and that is a good tea (maybe have some rashers too).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: sean on 05 Aug 2009, 18:49
oh shittttt diy soda bread i am about to be all over that shit.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 05 Aug 2009, 19:33
i use james' bread recipe whenever i make bread (it is on his blog (http://ratherbebaking.blogspot.com/2008/02/simple-start.html)) which is a pretty good multi-purpose bread that you can add things to and modify to your liking. i also kind of feel like i am probably weirding him out big time with the amount of time i spend talking about him and how good his baking is every time the topic of baking comes up so maybe it is time for me to chill out for a little while.
sorry, james, i hope we are still cool please don't be afraid of me
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 05 Aug 2009, 23:37
Tania it is cool no worries! We are now mutual friends of two people I know through not-internet! You are worthwhile to keep around just for that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 16 Aug 2009, 21:35
baking pie tonight. from scratch. So far, cutting in butter, sans pastry blender, sucks. My hand hurts. I used a wooden spatula. Looks, and smells great, though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 19 Aug 2009, 10:52
I cooked the other night.  Really.  I don't have any pictures, but I'll describe it.

Panko-crusted tilapia (pan fried)
-just dredged in flour, egg then panko and pan fried until (as AB puts it) GBD
Shitake mushroom risotto
-Sweat of vidalia onions and red peppers with shallots and garlic.  Risotto (the normal method, and I use chicken broth damnit!).  Sautee the mushrooms (medium slice) with some cognac to deglaze and add.  Then finish with a whole shitload of parmesan cheese.
Roasted zucchini and squash
-Really coarse chop, salt, pepper, oil 450F oven
Beurre Blanc
-White wine, lemon juice and shallots over high heat.  Reduce au sec.  Add cream (optional) and heat for a little longer.  Reduce heat more and add butter slowly while whisking to emulsify.  Alternate on and off the heat to avoid the fat and cream separating out of the butter.

Now, I've made beurre blanc three times and I've never broken it, but it's only emulsified once (it's always been too thick), and that time it was on the verge of breaking.  Am I not heating it enough?  Am I not whisking it enough?  Did I not reduce the wine and lemon juice enough?  Who can help me?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 19 Aug 2009, 18:36
I have chicken parmesan going in the oven right now. We'll see how it turns out, i didn't bread the chicken because I thought I didn't have eggs or bread crumbs. Turns out i was wrong.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 19 Aug 2009, 22:22
I cooked the other night.  Really.  I don't have any pictures, but I'll describe it.

Panko-crusted tilapia (pan fried)
-just dredged in flour, egg then panko and pan fried until (as AB puts it) GBD
Shitake mushroom risotto
-Sweat of vidalia onions and red peppers with shallots and garlic.  Risotto (the normal method, and I use chicken broth damnit!).  Sautee the mushrooms (medium slice) with some cognac to deglaze and add.  Then finish with a whole shitload of parmesan cheese.
Roasted zucchini and squash
-Really coarse chop, salt, pepper, oil 450F oven
Beurre Blanc
-White wine, lemon juice and shallots over high heat.  Reduce au sec.  Add cream (optional) and heat for a little longer.  Reduce heat more and add butter slowly while whisking to emulsify.  Alternate on and off the heat to avoid the fat and cream separating out of the butter.

Now, I've made beurre blanc three times and I've never broken it, but it's only emulsified once (it's always been too thick), and that time it was on the verge of breaking.  Am I not heating it enough?  Am I not whisking it enough?  Did I not reduce the wine and lemon juice enough?  Who can help me?
It's quite possible you reduced too much, so maybe back off the heat for a bit.  Also I never wisk with a buerre blanc, i usually just shake and swirl off the heat and only put it on when the pan cools too much.

Also, why don't you cook the mushrooms in the risotto when you do the onions and deglaze there?  you'd get a much better flavor in your risotto it seems.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Be My Head on 19 Aug 2009, 22:38
I had Crepes Suzette tonight, with FRESH strawberries, raspberries, and freshly whipped cream.

The sauce took a long ass time to thicken, and it wasn't precisely measured enough in my opinion, but it still tasted scrumm-fucking-uncious.

I highly recommend cooking crepes. The only "special" ingredients you need for the version I cooked are fresh oranges, lemons, and a juicer of some kind.

Oh, and booze and a lighter, but I didn't do that (next time maybe). I guess I can't really call it "suzette", but they were still really good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 20 Aug 2009, 08:06
It's quite possible you reduced too much, so maybe back off the heat for a bit.  Also I never wisk with a buerre blanc, i usually just shake and swirl off the heat and only put it on when the pan cools too much.

Also, why don't you cook the mushrooms in the risotto when you do the onions and deglaze there?  you'd get a much better flavor in your risotto it seems.

Hmmmm...  I'll give that a shot next time.  As far as the mushrooms go, I wanted to sautee them and not sweat them because I think that they get a little rubbery when you cook them that long, but I don't know if I've tried doing them together in risotto.  Maybe the chicken broth will keep them tender?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 21 Aug 2009, 12:18
Yeah, I see your point about them getting rubbery.  I don't think the stock will change how tender it is.  I've always done it in there.

I really want to get some morels and do some truffle oil-morel grits.  NOM NOM NOM
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ViolentDove on 30 Aug 2009, 05:17
Had my first crack at cooking mie goreng tonight (the proper stuff, not the instant noodles), and it went pretty damn well, except the sambal ulek I had in the fridge is nowhere near spicy enough, so next time I will make my own. If anyone likes spicy-fragranty-salty noodle dishes then this is a damn good one.

I used this recipe (http://rasamalaysia.com/mee-goreng-spicy-fried-noodles/) as a guide, but also added in tofu and potatoes (boiled first, then sliced thinly and fried with the rest) for my vegetarian housemate and cooked the chicken and prawns separately. And also I like to have a bit of lime to squeeze over the noodles when serving as well.

I've got a bunch more ingredients to use up, so I might cook it again tomorrow night and take pictures!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 07 Sep 2009, 12:01
Okay, so, someone in this thread posted a link to Irish Soda Bread.

I can't find the link because my computer is being a shitcunt, so thank you to that person because it is fucking delicious. I just made it and oh my god, I have never baked bread before but I am going to keep doing this.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 07 Sep 2009, 12:06
It was me! That is one of my favourite recipes too. This (http://www.recipezaar.com/Traditional-Irish-Soda-Bread-21950) is the recipe and it is super easy and super tasty so you guys should try it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: GenericName on 09 Sep 2009, 19:50
For dinner today I made the most excellent discovery.

I opened my refrigerator with the intent of making some kind of Bechamel on pasta for a meal, and discovered some Emmental cheese which had gotten hard and needed to be grated.
I then looked in the back and found some unopened cream cheese which had expired, but appeared to still be good.
Then I discovered some fresh ground beef and a potato.

The discovery was twofold: a Mornay sauce becomes luscious with cream cheese in it, and Swedish meatballs go wonderfully in that. Also a cubed potato found its way into the mix!

I so wish I had some of that left. So much better than whitesauce on pasta.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 29 Sep 2009, 14:24
Today I've tried a number of things for the first time.

I brined a whole chicken (thawed) with a brine solution with fresh ginger and garlic, lime-juice, and crushed dried chili-peppers. And some sugar! (I never use sugar for savory foods)

After a few hours I rinsed the chicken thoroughly, patted it dry, and rubbed it well with some dry rub I'd made from... well, stuff. Including sugar!!! Brown sugar! (I never use brown sugar) I then stuffed a half-full can of Grolsch (I've never bought Grolsch in a can--pretty sure the brand doesn't matter one bit though) punched through with some holes into the chicken, and grilled it in the oven. Standing upright!!! (definitely a first :D)

In low heat! (never do this with chicken that hasn't been deboned)

Increased the heat towards the end to brown and crisp it properly, took it out, used the drippings to flavour some delicious large-grained couscous (mixed with fried mushrooms and some perfectly done zucchini and cherry-tomatoes + fresh coriander and thyme), made a sauce from yoghurt and avocado and ginger and garlic and lime and fresh herbs and capers...

and then i ate all of it, and it was bloody delicious :D best ever. Esp. with ice-cold water :)

warmly recommended! the chicken was juicy and absolutely lovely :) gonna change some things for the next run, but from now on all my grilled chicken is belong to brine :up:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 29 Sep 2009, 17:44
In low heat! (never do this with chicken that hasn't been deboned)

Increased the heat towards the end to brown and crisp it properly, took it out, used the drippings to flavour some delicious large-grained couscous (mixed with fried mushrooms and some perfectly done zucchini and cherry-tomatoes + fresh coriander and thyme)

Sounds awesome, but you should also try it cranking up the heat (like, really hot roasting temps) and putting some potatoes underneath to catch the drippings, because it fries the potatoes as it cooks, and it's delicious.  It's like potatoes confit, except with chicken instead of duck fat.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 29 Sep 2009, 18:02
This thread needs a page break so my FF stops having seizures trying to load Ryan's goddamn pictures. Goddamn, Ryan. Honestly.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 29 Sep 2009, 18:07
Agreed.  Let's quickly knock this out by discussing knives.  What knives do other people use?  I have a Shun 8" french-style (not santoku).  It's pretty great.  I also sometimes use a Shun 6" boning knife and a Wüsthof serrated bread knife (it was actually the cheapest at the store).  Also, I use proper (http://z.about.com/d/culinaryarts/1/0/g/8/-/-/back0.jpg) grip (http://z.about.com/d/culinaryarts/1/0/e/8/-/-/front.jpg), which I've found to be very rare outside the culinary profession.  If you don't already hold your knife that way, I highly recommend it.  Chef made me start holding it that way, and it's really fantastic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 29 Sep 2009, 18:09
Someday I hope to own fancy expensive knives. Right now we just have one big choppy knife that wasn't very expensive. Sturdy, but I know for a fact that there are better knives out there.

Also, I did not know that there was a proper way to grip your knife. I will try that next time I am chopping something!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 29 Sep 2009, 18:11
It will feel very weird at first, but then you will be quicker.  In my opinion, the main thing about good knives is that they tend to hold an edge better than cheaper ones.  As long as your knife is sharp, it doesn't matter what brand it is (we had the cheap, plastic handled knives in the kitchen, but we got new ones in frequently, so they were always razor sharp).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 29 Sep 2009, 18:25
It seems pretty sharp, but that is not a thing that will last forever. There is a store that does free knife sharpening in the mall on occasion, so if it gets dull we can take it in. Really, it cuts what it needs to cut. I think that is enough for me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 29 Sep 2009, 18:27
Also, everyone says that it's safer to use a sharper knife.  That statement is true, if you're a careful person.  I am not a careful person in general, and as such I learned a number of lessons about paying attention to where your off-hand is.  I also learned one lesson about paying attention to where your fingers are on your dominant hand.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 29 Sep 2009, 18:31
I have never cut myself while cooking, to my knowledge at least, but I suppose I don't hold my sharp knives correctly, so there's less chance of them being caught between blade and surface. Generally speaking I am more worried about the fingers on my non-dominant hand getting in the way as I hold whatever is being all chopped up.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 29 Sep 2009, 18:34
Yeah, I've only ever run into trouble on my dominant hand once.  I would usually have issues with my non-dominant hand because I'd be going as quickly as I did in a professional kitchen, but with less of my attention focused on the task at hand.  Once, I was cooking for this girl I liked, and within five minutes of her arriving, I had cut myself twice.  It was due to being nervous and distracted at the same time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 29 Sep 2009, 18:38
This thread is bringing back that little part in me that wants to go to culinary school. I was on a kick for a while where I just wanted to finish my degree and chuck it out the window to go to culinary school and become a shift. Really though I am just flighty, I've also considered philosophy, physics, wildlife biology, music, civil engineering, and who knows what else.

Also nice work. Did you two still hang out or was bleeding all over her food a deal breaker?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 29 Sep 2009, 18:45
We don't hang out because I don't think it really worked-out for other reasons (she really loved the food).  Amusingly, I think I saw her in traffic on my way home today.

I got my aspirations as a line cook out of the way as soon as I worked in a kitchen.  My hands couldn't take something that was being applied to them, and they started peeling and being really gross and dry, so I had to use moisturizer on them, which resulted in my callouses going away, and that was not acceptable to me, because as much as I liked to cook, playing music is everything to me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 30 Sep 2009, 01:22
Knives - Sabatier, what else?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Hat on 30 Sep 2009, 01:41
I got my aspirations as a line cook out of the way as soon as I worked in a kitchen.

Basically chefs are possibly the most hardcore people I know including drug dealers and pub security guards. If you are ever going to get stuck up by someone holding a knife you should definitely try to be with a chef. Not that you should ever try to fight back against someone holding you up with a weapon, but this happened to me once and I guess if you are surrounded by lunatics wielding knives all day in a hot, cramped environment, you are less likely to be intimidated by someone threatening you with a knife, because my friend just haggled with the guy until we only had to give him a packet of cigarettes and some change for the bus to a suburb with more lucrative mugging prospects.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Bastardous Bassist on 30 Sep 2009, 09:19
Agreed.  Chefs are fucking bad-ass.  Real chefs.  Not the guy who sits at the front of the kitchen talking about how the food makes them feel.  The guy who's sitting there working the saute station while expediting orders.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: spoon_of_grimbo on 05 Oct 2009, 19:16
http://forums.questionablecontent.net/index.php/topic,21375.msg762899.html#msg762899 (http://forums.questionablecontent.net/index.php/topic,21375.msg762899.html#msg762899)

today, i reprised the recipe i outlined in THIS^ post a few pages back, but fried up some bacon strips and chopped mushrooms in butter, and added them to the casserole too.  it was well fucking special, like porn for the tastebuds or something! 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Dollface on 08 Jan 2010, 05:11
Peasoup time

kitchen
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10100-1.jpg)

peas have been in water whole night
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10101.jpg)

pour the water out
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10105.jpg)

add new cold water
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10106.jpg)

lets get things hot
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10107.jpg)

now lets sizzle that ground beef
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10111.jpg)

add some pepper
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10112.jpg)

and when that shit look shit like this its ready for its horrible fate
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10113.jpg)

BAM
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10117.jpg)

aww yeah
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10118.jpg)

and some salt
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10109.jpg)

neat cup dude
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10119.jpg)

Wrong you cunt its a mug
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10120.jpg)

bliss
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SDC10121.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: scarred on 08 Jan 2010, 05:16
aaaand now I'm hungry.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 14 Jan 2010, 16:38
So I've managed to not know/forget that we had a cooking thread, but Allison asked me to put my cheese making escapades up, so tada:

Please, if you are an experienced cheeser, know that I am not- this is my first time around, but it came out delicious so there. I made queso fresco, which is a mild white somewhat crumbly cheese that DOES NOT REQUIRE ANY FANCY RENNETTS OR ENZYMES. This is important, because getting that shit is kind of a pain in the butt.

Go out and buy a gallon of whole milk- the closer the dairy to where you live the better, because then it will be pasturized but not superduper pasturized (it wont make cheese if it is). I bought mine from Giant, and it's listed as coming from a town within my (not very big) state, so that's a safe bet.
You will also need a pretty big pot, white vinegar, and salt.
(http://photos-c.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs179.snc3/20647_854784467968_5739266_47868053_3820173_n.jpg)

Pour the milk into the pot and bring it up to heat a little bit, then add 9 Tbsp of white vinegar.
(http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs199.snc3/20647_854784472958_5739266_47868054_1570894_n.jpg)

Plan to spend about the next 45 min/hour hovering around the kitchen to watch it curdle and stir it now and then. If you have a thermometer, keep the mixture at about 80C- if not, get it warm but not boiling or anything.
The curds look pretty gross, but hey.
(http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs179.snc3/20647_854784502898_5739266_47868058_808904_n.jpg)

The curds will mat up on the surface, and the liquid below will get more and more clear- when it's mostly clear, you're done (it takes a while).
Set up a strainer in your sink, and line it with cheesecloth (or a thin clean dishtowel). Pour the hot cheesy moosh through, and let it drain by gravity for a while. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of salt (or more, if you're like me) around and stir it through the curds a bit.

(http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs199.snc3/20647_854784512878_5739266_47868060_1872295_n.jpg)

After a bit, wrap the towel over it a bit, and place something heavy on top to press out more liquid. You can see how high-tech my equipment is! This is not hard!
(http://photos-f.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs199.snc3/20647_854784517868_5739266_47868061_6201777_n.jpg)

Pull the whole mess out by the corners of your cloth/towel, and twist them up to press out even more liquid- this shit is still pretty hot, but mush it the best you can.
(http://hphotos-snc3.fbcdn.net/hs199.snc3/20647_854784527848_5739266_47868063_5876638_n.jpg)

I tied my bundle of cheese to the sink for a while to drip, not sure if it's necessary but it doesn't hurt!
(http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs179.snc3/20647_854784542818_5739266_47868065_4173267_n.jpg)

Grab a tall bowl and line it with a paper towel, then transfer your cheese ball into it- you can store it in the fridge like this, just pull the paper over to keep it from drying out! It tastes fantastic spread on some toast or a cracker:)


Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jace on 14 Jan 2010, 16:54
So you didn't add any bacteria to the mix to make it a different flavor? Also you didn't let it cure or anything, you are just eating it as is from that same day?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 14 Jan 2010, 17:49
I am about 100 times more impressed how you Macgyvered your way though the whole process. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 14 Jan 2010, 18:03
A guy at my boyfriend's work is currently reading a $300 book on the history of cheese, and how to make it, and all this crazy stuff about cheese. It's awesome! Cheese is my next food to tackle, I'm hellsa nervous about it. But that is so awesome that you did it!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 14 Jan 2010, 21:03
Supposedly you can do that by using curds from cottage cheese as well. Also you can mix in pretty much whatever spice/herb you want.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 15 Jan 2010, 08:04
Jace- I didn't add anything! I'd been putting off trying it until I had the money to order a kit with enzymes and stuff, but you can make this and apparently ricotta without any additions.

Dudes I think cheese is officially as complicated or as easy as you want it to be
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 15 Jan 2010, 12:58
You can make mozzerella similarly too.  I have it in some of my school books if you want me to find it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 15 Jan 2010, 15:37
I would love to know how to make mozzarella, it's one of my favourite cheeses!

Today I did a bit of an epic shop and now I have the ingredients to make cheese and potato soup, fruit & nut couscous (it was meant to be a Christmas dish but I didn't get round to it last term) and chocolate mousse. I even remembered to save the water from boiling sprouts this evening, to make the stock for the soup. Pics to come!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 15 Jan 2010, 18:10
http://www.essortment.com/all/makemozzarella_rkpy.htm

thats pretty much it except in my book you put the curds in hot water to make it pliable
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 16 Jan 2010, 16:52
So, we have finished our shopping for the day(still need to hit the international food store to finish our grocery shopping completely), and Whole Foods was having a sale on crab legs. As opposed to being $19.99/lb, they were $9.99/lb, so we got a little more than 2.5 lbs. Since we only wanted 2lbs, and the guy couldn't get that amount, and we were all super chatting, he only charged us for the 2lbs! So, we got roughly about $44 worth of crab legs for $19.98! The rest of our purchase totaled $42! Basically, I'm super excited because we've both been craving crab/seafood, and this was such a super deal.


But....


I have no idea how to store crab legs. These are fresh crab legs, wrapped in butcher paper. They were on ice(obviously) when we bought them, but not frozen. Should I store the in the fridge? Or the freezer? Or what should I do?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 16 Jan 2010, 18:19
When are you going to eat them? If very soon, fridge. If not, I am pretty sure you can freeze them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 17 Jan 2010, 18:02
Yeah, freeze 'em
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 17 Jan 2010, 18:28
I did. And hopefully, we will eat them on Monday. I'm not exactly sure how I'll make them quite yet, but I'm pretty excited.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 29 Jan 2010, 19:11
Cheese!

Another cheese that seems super easy to make is Labna (http://80breakfasts.blogspot.com/2008/03/labneh-or-labnahlabna-yogurt-cheese.html). It seems basically that you mix yoghuret and salt and drain it for as long as you want to get the right consistency, then roll it into little balls and store it in jars of herby olive oil. Really simple! It is delicious, too! I might try making some after I finish eating the stuff I bought today from the farmer's market.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 06 Feb 2010, 21:51
Okay so I made some mushroom pad thai tonight and it turned out pretty well! I don't have a camera so I could not record my process. But here's the recipe!

What you'll need:
4 oz flat rice noodles / rice vermicelli
1 tablespoon vegetable / sesame / what have you oil
2 garlic cloves, peeled and finely chopped
1 medium egg, lightly beaten -- remove this for a vegan meal!
3 cups mixed mushrooms, roughly chopped (shiitake, oyster, button, cremini, etc.) -- this seems like a lot but it will cook down considerably.

And for your sauce:
2 tablespoon lemon juice
1 1/2 tablespoon fish sauce
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper -- remove or add for your desired kick

optional!:
2 green onions
roasted unsalted peanuts, shelled
bean sprouts (I hate 'em)

Steps!:
1. Cook the rice noodles according to package instructions. While this is happening, put all your sauce ingredients in a bowl and blend together. Drain noodles well, and reserve.
2. Heat a wok or skillet. Add the oil, heat until oil can coat the pan easily, and add the garlic, frying until golden.
3. Throw in your beaten egg if you want it in there, stirring to break it up. Cook for 10-20 seconds, or until your egg is well cooked.
4. Add your reserved noodles and your chopped mushrooms. Cackle with the knowledge that you are about to have a fine meal.
5. Pour in your sauce solution, your peanuts if you want them cooked further, and your onions if you want them. Stir frequently and cook over high heat for 2-3 minutes, until everything is cooked through. Remove from heat, add bean sprouts or crushed peanuts if desired.
6. Eat that food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 07 Feb 2010, 21:59
whoa john you definitely don't want to use a full tablespoon of sesame oil in place of vegetable oil unless you are a lunatic who loves tasting sesame for a week. i'd suggest tossing in a few drops of sesame oil at about the same time you throw in your mushrooms so that they soak it up and burst with sesame flavour when you bite into them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 07 Feb 2010, 22:07
I love sesame oil. Sometimes I even used toasted sesame oil.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 07 Feb 2010, 23:56
i love sesame oil too but a tablespoon is a ridiculous amount of sesame oil to put in goddamn almost everything
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jace on 08 Feb 2010, 04:14
So, it turns out I really like eating, but do not like cooking at all. I end up wanting to eat, but then I think about having to cook and decide that I am okay being hungry. Anyone have any solutions to my dislike of cooking?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Metope on 08 Feb 2010, 04:38
Start cooking before you're actually hungry! That way it's more fun and you wont feel like rushing it and doing something quick and easy (like a sandwich or something) for dinner. Also if you really can't stand cooking, cook something that will last for a long time, and cook more than you'll eat so you'll have leftovers for a few days.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 10 Feb 2010, 13:06
Cooking cooking what am I cooking? I put some stewing cow meat in 1/2 cup yogurt 1/4 cup buttermilk plus garam masala, cumin, and crushed hot peppers, now it is sitting in my ceramic tajine in my oven, with the addition of some potato, onion, ginger, and garlic. I guess I am making tandoori veal tajine?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 02 Mar 2010, 17:20
Bumping this thread for a request. Do any of you guys have a chocolate chip cookies recipe that makes moist-like cookies? I want to send some to a friend living in Vancouver.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 02 Mar 2010, 20:04
you should try my Death by Chocolate Chip cookies (http://forums.questionablecontent.net/index.php/topic,15155.msg472333.html#msg472333)

look at these fuckers:
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v663/Lapuz/food/biccies.jpg)
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v663/Lapuz/food/biccie2.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 02 Mar 2010, 21:50
Thanks a lot Eris. I'll probably do it if I have condensed milk. They look so chocolatey, it hurts.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 02 Mar 2010, 22:24
Suggestion: if you expect them to be in the mail a while, maybe make 'em extra thick so they don't dry out so fast? Like, don't go crazy nuts or anything but I'd make them a little heavier than usual.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 03 Mar 2010, 11:58
Ship them with a slice of bread! It'll help keep the cookies moist.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: scarred on 03 Mar 2010, 14:10
If I had to die by eating cookies I would choose death by those cookies.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Mar 2010, 14:39
They are excellent cookies. You can only eat one, maybe two, before you start to feel sick but you keep eating them anyway because OM NOM NOM NOM
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 03 Mar 2010, 15:16
Awesome then. Thanks for the advice Slick and Em. And thanks for the confirmation of the goodness of the recipe Nick and Lunchy( ?)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Drill King on 03 Mar 2010, 15:23
Guys for dinner I am having toast with cream cheese and olives and this combination is amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 03 Mar 2010, 15:35
yeah, cream cheese and olives are pretty great.


Tonight I'm having a roast marinated in a bock beer and brown sugar marinade with pierogi and broccoli. I really want asparagus, but we don't have any. I may try to pick some up after the gym.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Mar 2010, 15:48
(Why the question mark after Lunchy?)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 03 Mar 2010, 16:37
(The question mark is after the sentence, not after Lunchy. As in,"Thanks for your comments. I'm not sure why I'm thanking you, but thanks anyways, I appreciate.")
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Mar 2010, 16:45
(They really are good cookies)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 03 Mar 2010, 17:22
(they are in the oven right now, they smell really good, and the dough tastes awesome.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: scarred on 03 Mar 2010, 17:23
(You are going to get cancer from eating cookie dough)

(Just kidding)

(But I can't eat it anymore because I got sick from too much one time)

(Sad face)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 03 Mar 2010, 17:32
(That happened to me once (the getting sick part, not the cancer part) and I just stopped eating too much of it)

(Moderation is the key)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 03 Mar 2010, 21:12
Well, those are great cookies. Next time I'll make those, I'll send them to my friend in BC.

Oh man, I can't stop eating them though. I am already at my 5th one. Somebody help me, please.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: scarred on 03 Mar 2010, 21:13
(Moderation is the key)

wait what
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 03 Mar 2010, 21:28
Hey, don't listen to me. I give bad advice.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 04 Mar 2010, 10:27
What is a fairly simple, vegetarian and delicious way of cooking sweet potato? It could be as a side or as a main dish, but I have no idea beyond treating it like a normal potato and boiling it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 04 Mar 2010, 10:41
Double bake them! Just like regular potatoes, but use butter and brown sugar to mix the delicious insides.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Theriandros on 04 Mar 2010, 10:43
Well now I somehow did not expect another person from Finland on these boards.

(I'm guessing that Dollface must be Finnish from what appears to be a Finnish beef package and a love of pea soup)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 04 Mar 2010, 10:47
Oh man not another Finn.

Are you drunk, belligerent and unintelligible too?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 04 Mar 2010, 10:53
Apparently not.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Theriandros on 04 Mar 2010, 11:13
I've never known belligerence to be a Finnish stereotype.

Now, being KICKASS, yes.

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_9cHkMILP4_A/Su8p3GFJJOI/AAAAAAAABHc/yywQlkVuUD4/s800/fdccax.jpg)

Also this guy is pretty cool: http://www.badassoftheweek.com/hayha.html
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 04 Mar 2010, 11:33
I don't know if it's a Finnish trait, but it's sure a Jussi trait.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 04 Mar 2010, 11:42
What is a fairly simple, vegetarian and delicious way of cooking sweet potato? It could be as a side or as a main dish, but I have no idea beyond treating it like a normal potato and boiling it.



I really really like to have them just like regular baked potatoes. I put chives and butter on them, and they are absolutely amazing. What Allison said though is also really really good. Thats how I typically prepare them for Thanksgiving.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 04 Mar 2010, 12:56
Man I was reading on the winter war just the other day. That's where Molotov cocktails come from!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 04 Mar 2010, 14:00
May I like to make sweet potato and garlic mash!
Peel, cut into cubes and boil one sweet potato (if you don't have much or you think it will be too sweet, boil some regular potato too) till soft, then mash it with a smidgen of milk/cream/soy/ricemilk, some fresh minced garlic (sautee it for a bit if you want but this isn't necessary) and maybe a bit of butter/margarine/vegan spread. It is AMAZING and basically the only delicious thing I can cook.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: StaedlerMars on 09 Apr 2010, 13:36
Sweet potatoes are neat.

Another food item that is neat when cooked? Bananas.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 Apr 2010, 04:32
What is a fairly simple, vegetarian and delicious way of cooking sweet potato? It could be as a side or as a main dish, but I have no idea beyond treating it like a normal potato and boiling it.

I sincerely hope you do more with potatoes than just boil them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 Apr 2010, 04:32
Why don't you try making oh I don't know SWEET POTATO FRIES and dip them in homemade honey dill sauce i mean seriously
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 Apr 2010, 06:50
Another food item that is neat when cooked? Bananas.

I prefer plantains. Assuming you are slicing, battering, and frying them (this is the only way I've cooked bananas), plantains are nicer because you only have to dredge them in flour instead of battering them! Just make sure your plantains are ripe, and they are not ripe until they are going black on the outside.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 14 Apr 2010, 08:00
What is a fairly simple, vegetarian and delicious way of cooking sweet potato? It could be as a side or as a main dish, but I have no idea beyond treating it like a normal potato and boiling it.

I sincerely hope you do more with potatoes than just boil them.

Well yeah, sometimes I mash them, sometimes I cut them into rings and fry them, sometimes I bake them, sometimes I roast them. I was wondering if there was any special way to use sweet potatoes, bearing in mind that I'm in a crappy student kitchen and can't use the stove for more than about half an hour or the other 16 people get cross.

I'm currently on a lunch kick, so if any of you have great ideas for cold vegetarian lunches, let's hear them!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 Apr 2010, 08:45
Spicy sweet potato fries are something I love but have never made. I will probably try this recipe (http://kalynskitchen.blogspot.com/2007/10/spicy-sweet-potatoes-fries-recipe.html) soon because it looks good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 Apr 2010, 09:53
Three kinds of meat and a fried egg? Looks great.

I made a bacon explosion (http://www.bbqaddicts.com/blog/recipes/bacon-explosion/) again last night, marking the second time I've done so. Man it is good to be smoking food on a barbecue.
I never like to make the same thing over and over, though, so my thought was, why not keep the bacon lattice for the shell, but replace the sausage with ground beef so it'd be bacon-spiral burgers? Or maybe stuff it with jalapeno peppers!
I've never really had a satisfactory experience stuffing meat with cheese, but I would consider a jalapeno-cheddar stuffed bacon beef log because that sounds good enough to be worth the gamble.

Anybody else have good ideas on bacon explosion mods?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 14 Apr 2010, 13:03
Hey guys, do you want me to tell you about what a heart attack is like now, or shall I come back when you're eating?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 Apr 2010, 13:19
James - instead of pork sausage, use lamb.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 Apr 2010, 14:11
Lamb, that is a good approach.

This winter I was very pleased with my tourtiere and would like to find a way to make it in the summer. Obviously I could just, make it in the summer, but meat pie feels like a winter thing. The core of the pie was just that it was pork & lamb simmered in turkey broth, so maybe I will do turkey & lamb bacon log on the barbecue.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 Apr 2010, 21:52
Ground turkey is very unexciting in my opinion. You gotta get something with some flavour to it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 15 Apr 2010, 00:01
Another food item that is neat when cooked? Bananas.

Although they have gotten a bad rap for contributing somewhat to the death of Elvis Presley, fried banana sandwiches are fucking tops. Just don't eat several every day like he did and you should be fine.

What is the difference between bananas and plantains?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 15 Apr 2010, 02:42

Well yeah, sometimes I mash them, sometimes I cut them into rings and fry them, sometimes I bake them, sometimes I roast them. I was wondering if there was any special way to use sweet potatoes, bearing in mind that I'm in a crappy student kitchen and can't use the stove for more than about half an hour or the other 16 people get cross.
I seem to recall a recipe for coconut candied yam slices that was pretty simple. I'll have to track it down.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 15 Apr 2010, 02:57
Boil em, mash em, stick em in a stew?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Apr 2010, 05:37
Plantains are like bigger, heavier bananas. You do not eat them like bananas because they are tougher and not as sweet, but they cook much more nicely in my opinion.


J.C. I agree totally on ground turkey being lame but I want that turkey flavour in there. Maybe the solution is to make a special barbecue sauce for it based on a reduction of turkey stock?
As soon as I start getting paid at my exciting new call-centre job I will buy a turkey and make stock and make a turkey-based barbecue sauce.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KharBevNor on 15 Apr 2010, 06:38
Turkey has a flavour?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 16 Apr 2010, 21:46
Guys I made nachos last night, they were excellent! But there is A Problem

I freakin' love nachos, everybody loves nachos. But if you are like me, you prefer the first part of the nachos: When they are fresh and the chips are so deliciously crispy. Then when they night wears on the chips begin to get soggy until you are left with a soggy chip/salsa slurry. Often I just stop eating and let those nachos, which once had so much potential, go to waste.

CookingThread is there any way to stop this from happening? Or is it just an unassailable, eternal property of nachos themselves?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 16 Apr 2010, 22:19
Make them in smaller batches throughout the night?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Spluff on 17 Apr 2010, 00:55
Step up your game and eat faster.

It ain't rocket science.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 17 Apr 2010, 01:20
Turkey has a flavour?

If you've never eaten turkey with any flavour you need to start spending more money on the meat you buy. I'd suggest you hang the expense and buy an organic turkey next Christmas, make sure it doesn't get overcooked, and taste the difference.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: öde on 20 Apr 2010, 09:14
I finally cooked something worth talking about

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash1/hs430.ash1/23782_385215524787_575839787_3685165_3201037_n.jpg)

Quorn chicken fried with chilis and capers with sun-dried tomatoes and stuffed peppers on salad and humus.

Surprisingly quick to make! Probably too many ingredients though. Next time I'll leave out the stuffed peppers and fry the tomatoes with the quorn, and add a few more capers and chilis.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: scarred on 20 Apr 2010, 12:38
that looks scrumptious!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 20 Apr 2010, 16:15
I attempted to "cook" a microwave ginger sponge pudding earlier, and the pot melted.

MELTED. After less than two minutes in an 800w microwave. What is that about?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: öde on 23 Apr 2010, 07:36
Breakfast: rice fried with chilli, onion, spinach, assorted asian veg, and peanuts, in soy sauce.

I love cooking!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 26 Apr 2010, 22:19
I have a nice little salmon fillet in my freezer, I am going to cook this for dinner. However I am trying to reduce my grocery bill over the next few weeks and don't want to buy anything. Let us assume I have staples (rice, pasta, herbs, sauces etc) in my kitchen.
What can I do with this salmon for dinner?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 27 Apr 2010, 07:54
I did salmon the other day by just frying it up plain, then accessorizing it with herb & lemon rice and stir-fried pepper and broccoli tossed with balsamic vinegar and maple syrup.
If you add lemon to rice as it's cooking the flavour kind of disappears, so just give a couple squirts of lemon juice right before the rice is done. Herbs can go in when you feel appropriate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gemmwah on 27 Apr 2010, 08:00
Salmon is way good when you lemon it up, stick it in a tin foil parcel with a few herbs and bake it for 20 minutes or so, and serve with boiled new potatoes and salad. Yum.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 27 Apr 2010, 08:32
In the end I fried it with some tomato paste, basil and garlic and ate it with rice. It was ok but not amazing. I am such a bad cook.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: StaedlerMars on 28 Apr 2010, 00:40
I just ate some of my flatmate's peppers stuffed with goat cheese and mushrooms.

Fucking A
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 28 Apr 2010, 14:07
Salmon is way good when you lemon it up, stick it in a tin foil parcel with a few herbs and bake it for 20 minutes or so, and serve with boiled new potatoes and salad. Yum.

Salmon en papillote is probably great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gemmwah on 28 Apr 2010, 14:31
you know what, johnny, that sounds really fucking tasty and now i am cursing not picking up some salmon yesterday when i had the chance!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 13 May 2010, 19:37
I got brand new cookware so I cooked some wares

(http://pretentiousgamer.com/etc/foods.jpg)

Ham and broccoli frittata. Steamed asparagus w/ hollandaise sauce.

(http://pretentiousgamer.com/etc/brot.jpg)

Fresh baked rosemary peasant bread.

Fuck yeah dinner!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: beat mouse on 14 May 2010, 14:39
Timewarping all the way back to sweet potatoes, mash that shit up with some carrots (like 3:1 sweet:carrot), nutmeg and cinnamon, line the bottom of a bake dish, cover in small marshmallows and dust with more cinnamon/nutmeg and bake that shit until its golden brown on top. mmmmmmm.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 May 2010, 17:20
That sounds a little fucked but I will try it because it also sounds a little great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 14 May 2010, 20:23
I was 100% with you until the marshmallows. Say what?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 May 2010, 21:09
if you're baking it they'll melt and carmelize and possibly brown on top meaning you get a nice caramel-y substance on top that goes nicely with the natural sweetness of yams and sweet potatoes
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 14 May 2010, 21:22
I very much want to try this recipe (http://www.portlandmercury.com/portland/aching-thighs/Content?oid=2519004), and not just because it comes to us courtesy of Peter Cropes
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 16 May 2010, 05:24
Recently I've discovered the magic and delight of deep-frying food at home. Last week I made these Italian parmesan and egg and bacon puff thingies from the Silver Spoon cookbook which were delicous but also basically a heart attack you can fit in your pocket; last night I cooked Thai fish cakes for the first time ever, using the recipe in David Thompson's Thai Food book, and they were delicious (though very messy and sticky to make).

I'm very fortunate in having reputedly Melbourne's best fishmonger only a block from my house.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 16 May 2010, 10:20
Deep-frying is something I do quite sparingly but it's nevertheless something really fun to do in yr own kitchen. There's something to be said for making a nice, crisp batch of french fries at home.

Also, everyone learn how to make quinoa. It's basically a wonder food. I tossed a bunch with some sautéed spinach, mushrooms, shallots and asparagus today, tossed on some parmesan and some green onion, and pulled the bus into Flavourtown, population me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 16 May 2010, 13:53
Also quinoa has a decent amount of protein in it so your meal doesn't feel as carb heavy as if you have a side of rice or potatoes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 16 May 2010, 17:26
Yes, but will it prevent malaria?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 16 May 2010, 21:05
Does anyone have any recipes for sauces? I've been stir-frying a lot lately and want to venture in making some sauces for them. Would I be wrong to start with soy sauce and just go from there? I have never made a sauce, so I honestly have no idea what to do there. (Mostly I just want to learn how to do this so I can mimic this pineapple curry sauce I had at a Mongolian bbq restaurant and I'm not sure what base to use or which curry I should go with, but I'm thinking yellow at the moment just because it didn't have too much heat.)

Also I want it to stop raining so I can grill more veggies. It is my favorite thing to do in the summer is to grill whatever type of veggie that I think would taste good grilled. So far I've done: asparagus, yellow squash, red onion, red and green bell peppers, red potatoes, green onions, and also pineapple. What other fruits and veggies do you guys like grilled?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: StreetSpirit on 16 May 2010, 22:01
I think you are exactly right to start with some soy sauce. You could always tweak it a bit by adding some brown sugar, ground ginger, a bit of rice vinegar, and some siracha if you like it spicy to make a richer sauce with a definitely Asian twist. Using different oils in the stir-frying process can also help to add a bit more complexity to the veggies/meats which can save you from having to over sauce the dish later on (or it will bring out more flavor by interacting with the sauce you concocted).

As for other random fruits/veggies to grill: apples, peaches, nectarines, and pears grill well into sweeter dishes or as a condiment to a savory dish, as far as veggies, i think you can just continue on the path you are and move onto eggplants, corn and then to various fungus.

But seriously, everyone posting here as some unique tastes and a definite passion for food - I dig it! Keep up the wonderful work everyone, I'll try and add a nice recipe or two to the page a bit later.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 16 May 2010, 22:10
Sauces for stir-fries are really easy because you can make incredibly tasty ones just by quickly mixiing he components together: unlike a lot of European sauces you don't have to do any cooking or any tedious mixing or folding, just tip everything into a cup and stir them together with a spoon and you're on the train to tasty town. A really good combination is sesame oil, fish sauce or soy sauce (depending on what kind of salty flavour you want), rice vinegar, and palm sugar. Just tinker with the quantities until everything is balanced: bear in mind that fish sauce and soy sauce are going to be much stronger in flavour than any of the other components so don't go overboard with them; also the vinegar is quite sweet so don't put too much sugar in, just enough to take the bite out of the saltiness. The sesame oil gives a really nice nutty base which softens the harsher elements of the other components. When I'm making a stir-fry I like to marinate some chicken in this kind of sauce beforehand, and then tip the sauce into the stir-fry near the end of the cooking; if you are using it as a marinade then adding some star anise to it is a really nice touch.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 17 May 2010, 03:07
Lately I've been starting with a 1/2 honey, 1/2 soy sauce base for all my stir fry sauces (adding, at different times, white vinegar, mustard, brown sugar, sesame oil, apple juice, coconut milk, etc.), and it makes me really happy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 May 2010, 13:41
I also feel totally fine throwing in some hot wing sauce or something with a stir-fry. It is spicy, tasty, and simple. It is not authentic, but it is gets in my tummy OK.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: philharmonic on 10 Jul 2010, 17:42
I made some sponge toffee (hokey pokey for you people down under).
Then posted it on youtube (see link below).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaEg1bt0l8w (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaEg1bt0l8w)

It didn't turn out as well as i would like. Next time I'll try putting a little bit of vinager in to counter the baking soda taste. Cooking it a little longer to more brown than yellow. Oh and pour all of it into one pan so it will be thicker.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 11 Jul 2010, 00:31
That's called honeycomb here, cuz. Not hokey pokey.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 11 Jul 2010, 12:47
My favorite sauce for stir-frys and chicken, with a sort of Asian influence, is as follows:

In a pot gentley heat orange juice and soy sauce(I don't really keep track of the measurements, but I'm gonna say probably like 2 cups orange juice and a few tablespoons of soy sauce. Until it is a weird orange-ish brown. And tastes alright). Add honey(Probably about an equal amount as the soy sauce, but taste it! Always taste!), stir until combined. Then add some garlic and some fresh gingerm both finely minced. Continue cooking for a bit, just to bring out flavors. Pull it off whenever you are ready.

Now you can either throw it on some plain rice, or in a stir-fry, or on some chicken.(If you do chicken, then let it marinate for at least an hour, before cooking)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 11 Jul 2010, 21:23
That sound ridiculously sweet.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 11 Jul 2010, 22:48
Well soy sauce is absurdly salty, so that should cut it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: beat mouse on 12 Jul 2010, 00:52
For stir-fries I love to use a combination of balsamic vinegar, lime/orange juices, and (finely diced and sauteed) red peppers and garlic, and brown sugar to thicken.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 12 Jul 2010, 01:17
It's not that much soy though, and light soy is salty, dark isn't.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 12 Jul 2010, 03:37
It's not that much soy though, and light soy is salty, dark isn't.

Pardon?  I was looking at the label on a dark soy bottle on Saturday, and it was 12% salt.  The "low-salt" one I was looking for turns out to be a mere 9% salt.  This is not good for the heart!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: HiFranc on 12 Jul 2010, 05:04
I have two main bases that I cook for food:

Equipment:
Kettle
Cup
Sieve
Microwave oven
Large microwaveable container (NOT specifically designed for rice)

Rice with lentils:
1 cup easy cook rice
1 chicken stock cube (can use vegetable or fish as appropriate)
1/2 cup lentils
water


Rice with red kidney beans

Similar to above except:

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 12 Jul 2010, 11:30
It's not that much soy though, and light soy is salty, dark isn't.

Pardon?  I was looking at the label on a dark soy bottle on Saturday, and it was 12% salt.  The "low-salt" one I was looking for turns out to be a mere 9% salt.  This is not good for the heart!
When you taste dark soy it is not salty in comparison to light soy.  Dark is for flavor and light is for salt.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 12 Jul 2010, 11:49
It's sweet but not ridiculously so. It's pretty fantastic. You should try it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Jul 2010, 09:36
I was gonna say, that stir fry doesn't look like it's got overwhelming flavours. It ain't Kveep's full tablespoon of sesame oil.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 13 Jul 2010, 14:14
mmm sesame oil
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 13 Jul 2010, 19:16
Recently I have discovered the joys of steaming and of deep frying. Health-wise I like to think the two balance each other out.

Here is an incredibly simple and afordable meal which is also extremely delicious:

- chop up some pork fillet and marinate it for a while in a mixture of light soy sauce, fish sauce, sesame oil, and water;
- cook some brown rice;
- take the pork out of the marinade and pat it dry on some paper towels, to remove the excess marinade;
- steam it for around 20 minutes;
- chop up some bok-choi, and simmer it in a saucepan in a thin layer of sesame oil, rice wine vinegar, and water, until it is well cooked;
- serve in a bowl in 3 layers: rice on the bottom, bok-choi in the middle, pork on top.

I've been experimenting with adding lapsang souchong tea leaves to the saucepan when I'm steaming the pork, to try to get some of the smoky flavour into the meat, but so far without success.

Also, if you can then get organic free-range pork, because the difference in flavour is unbelievable. Mass-produced commercial pork is so reduced in flavour that it's almost not worth eating - not to mention the miserable lives the animals lead.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 Jul 2010, 10:56
I am maaaakking jeerrrrrky tomorrrroooow!

Also I am eating some rice and bean salad for lunch today, it is rice cooked with parmesean rind, beans from a can, and my marinated roasted red peppers and onions (caramelized onions, roasted red peppers, balsamic vinegar, olive oil, parsley) all mixed up and served cold. It is pretty good!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 14 Jul 2010, 12:37
I made this last night and it was rad. Also a salad and a bottle of wine.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iERZIRQEIJk&


Two nights ago we made grilled lime marinated mahi-mahi tacos with a cabbage jicama slaw, home made grilled corn pico, and a chipotle grilled corn creme sauce.

Also there was wild rice, and key lime pie. And 7-11 day free pina coloda slurpees with rum in them. And wine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 14 Jul 2010, 19:40
Once you have learned how to make carbonara you feel like a god, man that is amazing stuff.

I am slicing up my brisket before marinating it before jerkying it tomorrow, and I am hungry, so I just took a slunk that was too awkward to cut and now I am steaming it because Harry was like "Steaming, it's a thing". I am just using a cooling rack over a pot with a lid on top of it, it seems to be working. Basically I am just going to steam it, toss it with wing sauce, then eat it with a side of my bean-rice salad I am still finishing up.

Also, fuck brisket. Maybe I will cook it right sometime but it was a silly choice for jerkying because there is too much fat. One recipe recommended it and it was cheap but it ain't worth this hassle, since I ain't got razor-sharp knives.
I mean it is still a fun time and I value my experience chopping up this beef but I'm going to get a leaner roast next time.

p.s. midnight is the time when I toss things together with abandon so I am eating steamed brisket which was subsequently sliced and tossed with wing sauce, honey hoisin and honey mustard and mixed with beans and rice and pickled peppers and I am pretty pleased with it.
I mean, carbonara is bitchin' nd impressive, but this haphazard hodgpodge is fairly satisfying.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 14 Jul 2010, 21:04
James, it seems to me that the obviously cut would be flank.


And man, I do not mean to make you feel bad, but beef is really something that you should not steam. It should be seared. And brisket is so flavorful and I feel like steaming it will make it lose a lot of its flavors. What are you doing?

And since brisket is so fatty, its pretty damn tasty first seared, and then cooked up in a stew of sorts, or roasted. The best beef brisket I've ever made was seared on both sides, then placed aside while I deglazed the pot with some red wine. Cooked that up with a broth, a bouquet garni, and some veggies. It was amazing.

but expensive. How the hell is brisket cheap where you are? It is expensive most places around here, and only cheap at the Amish grocery, and you have to get there super early to get it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 14 Jul 2010, 21:09
Steaming's really good for pork and chicken but I don't know how it would go for other meats. Probably other poultry would be fine. Mabye it's only good for white meats? I dunno.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 14 Jul 2010, 22:07
Yeah, I can see it for fish, and chicken, and pork, but I'm still iffy about the latter two. With ground meats, I feel like it would work out ok, but not bring them to their fullest flavor, but still be ok. But with a cut like brisket, I just can't see it.


Anyway, I made orange chicken, and fried rice for dinner. It was nothing special. Yesterday was Mediterranean stuffed peppers, and the day before veggie lasagna. Also, hummus. Those things were fun and tasty. Tomorrow, hopefully something also fun. Probably this salmon and pasta in a cream sauce I've been thinking of.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 15 Jul 2010, 01:01
most of the fat on a brisket is removable though. that's why you smoke it fat side up, to allow the fat on top to render through the rest of the beef. if you're talking about the stuff in the meat, that's mostly collagen from connective tissue, and while that may make it a bitch to cut it'll hopefully turn out nice and tender as those collagens break down over the process of curing. let us know how it pans out, james!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Jul 2010, 07:10
The main attraction of the steaming of the brisket was that it was hands-off, and that the steaming process should render the fat out to an extent. I was considering rendering the fat but decided it was not worth the hassle and potential smell.

You can get steamed beef at Chinese places, so I assumed it was OK. I know it is not as good as if it were barbecued (smoked) but it was a minimal effort dish that worked pretty well.

Jerky is in oven, I have already learned a few things.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Jul 2010, 09:10
OK so something weird just happened. I marinated the beef in soy, red wine, some sweet chili sauce, and black pepper last night before jerkying today. I figured, hey, beef and quinoa for lunch, so I will cook the remaining marinate a little bit and reduce it then use it as a sauce for lunch. I heated the pan, added sesame oil, fried some garlic, then poured the remaining marinate in. Immediately, it looked like an egg just in the pan; the bottom cooked up and came solid.
With a little more heat, it separated into this gunk and some light liquid, but I do not know what happened here! Did the marinate leach out the fat or the collagen and cook it? This is really weird and I don't know what went on here.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 15 Jul 2010, 11:06
I'm sorry I can't help you, but that sounds hideously disgusting
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: HiFranc on 15 Jul 2010, 12:58
Slick, you're probably best asking a food scientist.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Jul 2010, 15:42
OK so:
Jerky is OK. A little too salty/soy-y. 3/4 cup of soy for 4lbs of beef is too much, despite what the internet recipes said. Maybe it is because I have more intense soy, sauce, though. Next time I will cut back and try marinating with sweeter barbecue style sauces for more rounded flavour.
Jerky is too crisp. I dried it for six hours in the oven, at which point it felt perfect, but on cooling and drying a bit more on the counter, it became crisper and sub-optimal. Still fine to eat and everything, but I thought the texture was perfect when I took it out and then it cooled and dried some more, so next time I will take it out before it feels perfect.
Also, I will try and get a thicker roast to slice. Some of this brisket was too tiny to lay across my oven racks, so I'll need more cooling racks or a thicker roast. Most of the strips were fine, but some were just too short.
Also that brisket was tough to cut in places (also it was cheaper than some things, more expensive than one or two things, maybe the price is higher in the states because there is more demand for it than here?).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 16 Jul 2010, 11:05
OK so something weird just happened. I marinated the beef in soy, red wine, some sweet chili sauce, and black pepper last night before jerkying today. I figured, hey, beef and quinoa for lunch, so I will cook the remaining marinate a little bit and reduce it then use it as a sauce for lunch. I heated the pan, added sesame oil, fried some garlic, then poured the remaining marinate in. Immediately, it looked like an egg just in the pan; the bottom cooked up and came solid.
With a little more heat, it separated into this gunk and some light liquid, but I do not know what happened here! Did the marinate leach out the fat or the collagen and cook it? This is really weird and I don't know what went on here.

salting meat is a two-step process: first it leaches moisture out of a thing, THEN it returns moisture to said thing. you might have caught the marinade in a "leach stuff out" phase.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 16 Jul 2010, 11:17
I have not tried this recipe, but as it is, this is the only jerky recipe I've ever considered trying. It doesn't involve in oven, so its very very interesting to me. Also it comes from Alton Brown*, who is the only tv chef I really trust.

Ingredients

    * 1 1/2 to 2 pounds flank steak
    * 2/3 cup Worcestershire sauce
    * 2/3 cup soy sauce
    * 1 tablespoon honey
    * 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
    * 2 teaspoons onion powder
    * 1 teaspoon liquid smoke
    * 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    * Special Equipment: 1 box fan, 4 paper air-conditioning filters, and 2 bungee cords

Directions

Trim the flank steak of any excess fat, place in a zip-top bag, and place it in the freezer for 1 to 2 hours in order to firm up.

Remove the steak from the freezer and thinly slice the meat with the grain, into long strips.

Place the strips of meat along with all of the remaining ingredients into a large, 1-gallon plastic zip-top bag and move around to evenly distribute all of the ingredients. Place the bag into the refrigerator for 3 to 6 hours.

Remove the meat from the brine and pat dry. Evenly distribute the strips of meat onto 3 of the air filters, laying them in the grooves and then stacking the filters on top of one another. Top these with 1 empty filter. Next, lay the box fan on its side and lay the filters on top of it. Strap the filters to the fan with 2 bungee cords. Stand the fan upright, plug in and set to medium. Allow the meat dry for 8 to 12 hours. If using a commercial dehydrator, follow the manufacturer's directions.

Once dry, store in a cool dry place, in an airtight container for 2 to 3 months.

Also, vid (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIK4DVLHf7Y)eos! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfI0NKl-Kq0)


Man, I have a flank steak thawing in the fridge now. Its for Cameroon suya, but it's really tempting to make jerky. Maybe next time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 16 Jul 2010, 17:29
See the thing I didn't like about that was drying it on a fan, I think that is lame. Or, at least, my meat will be heated to a safe internal temperature. It is a novel approach but I am not to keen on it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 16 Jul 2010, 18:51
Something about the enviroment being too acidic for bacteria to grow makes it ok for that method. Plus the meat it salted beforehand which also makes it difficult for the bacteria to reproduce.

It would not be the first time in that show that Alton Brown has made it ok to eat raw beef.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 16 Jul 2010, 19:10
I see Alton's point, but I am inclined towards being more careful than not on account of not being totally sure how old the cut of meat is when I get it. I would be intrigued to try some cold-dried jerky but I am not convinced that my hitting it with 150 degrees really hurt the flavour that much.
Also I have an oven, I do not have a giant fan or want to waste filters. Also also I am disturbed that they said 'try to get cellulose not fiberglass'; I am allergic to fiberglass and ain't no one want microscopic fibers running around irritating their gut. Cellulose or no-dose, chumps. (edit: my thinking being that they should say get cellulose not fiberglass)

Flank is probably what I'll go with next, unless there's a good price on something.

Jerky texture is improved after a day in a zip-loc in the fridge. Apparently zip-locs aren't the best for jerky but then again this stuff is not going to make it anywhere near an expiry date.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 17 Jul 2010, 15:27
oh man.


oh.

man.


So, last night we made the Cameroon suya, and it was fantastic and tasty and wonderful(as grilled meats often are), but we also had homemade falfael, and hummus. Oh my god. I swear to you, I have never had hummus or falafel this good. Seriously. This is the best ever. It's so flavorful.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Jul 2010, 12:08
Man so this job is so consuming that I feel like I have to do a lot on my days off or it'll suck me down into nothingness. I asked a guy at work if he ever had nightmares where he woke up from the *beep* sound we get when a call comes in; he said, quite frankly, that he drinks to much to have dreams.

Towards the ends of not losing my life to a shitty job and drinking my days off away, I am cooking today! I got a chicken from the store and I have been simmering it for almost two hours now. I have read different things on the preparation of stock, so today I am trying something different from usual. The plan is to simmer the whole chicken for two hours, strain and separate chicken from stock, then gently fry celery, onions, and garlic before re-adding the stock and bones to the pot (planning to save the chicken meat for adding to spaghetti to give it some protein) before simmering for another hour.
Then I will drain and discard the bits, and use the stock for roasted red pepper, asparagus, and jalapeno soup. Dried hot peppers really add a much nicer flavour to chicken soups, but I have just not had time to make any yet this summer.
Also there'll be a grilled, chopped chicken breast or two added in there towards the end of the souping.

The other thing I'm doing today is something I've wanted to do for a while but have not had the time to do yet! I making sweet red bean paste, and I will make a tart of pastry shell, red bean paste, and lemon curd. I have yet to find a person who thinks this is a good idea, but man I am so psyched for it. Sweet bean paste, I am going to take you places!


p.s. I just realized I haven't eaten yet today so I am just spreading cream cheese on slices of calabrese salami, rolling them up, and eating them.
Life is good when it isn't bad.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 22 Jul 2010, 17:18
I made a beef pie last night with a sour cream short-crust pastry.

Now I feel like I'm pretty much ready to conquer the world.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 22 Jul 2010, 17:26
Someone give me an excellent recipe for quick beef casserole/stew please (with red wine perhaps).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Jul 2010, 18:13
like, cook up some beef, potatoes, carrots, onions, and garlic, brown some stuff and then add some stock and wine or water
that's all I got, but that's just what I do for beef stew

I am a big fan of mixing meats, e.g. use chicken or turkey stock to make beef stew.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 22 Jul 2010, 20:12
Lunchy, my best suggestion is to slow-cook it the day before, or on a weekend or something. One of the great things about a beef stew is that it the flavour will improve as it ages, so you can cook a heap and then put it in the fridge or the freezer and you'll have a week's worth of meals to defrost at your leisure.

Brown the beef in some stock and red wine, then chuck it in an oven-proof pot along with the vegetables James suggested and some herbs (bay leaves, thyme, parsley) and salt and pepper for seasoning, and put it in the oven on a really low heat (you don't want it to boil or the meat will get tough) for several hours. That's literally all the cooking you need to do, it's so simple. Eat it with bread or with mashed potatoes and some fresh green vegies such as beans or peas.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 22 Jul 2010, 20:45
See my problem with cooking is that I work full-time and get home at 6 on weekdays absolutely ravenous and want something RIGHT THEN AND THERE, and on the weekends I'm usually not at home.
I'd really like to have nice fresh food but it is an annoying trek to the grocery store and I'm incredibly impatient. I live on takeaway mainly.

Maybe I will try slow-cooking if I get any lazy time on the weekend.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 23 Jul 2010, 19:28
just smoked a tri-tip. took me like two and a half hours but oh my god so worth it
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jmrz on 23 Jul 2010, 20:32
I want to try making macaroons. Are they difficult to make? Has anyone made them before?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 23 Jul 2010, 21:54
Hey Johnny buy me a smoker?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 23 Jul 2010, 22:34
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ka2kpzTAL8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ka2kpzTAL8)

Ceramic smoker. Apparently it works.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 23 Jul 2010, 23:08
Jamie, I haven't made macarons myself (too scared and lazy) but Tartelette and Bakerella are the ones you should check out because they are the best at everything.

http://www.mytartelette.com/search?q=macarons&x=0&y=0

http://www.bakerella.com/macarons/
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 24 Jul 2010, 09:53
Jerky take two starts today. This time I got 3 1/2 pounds of top-of-round for the price of four pounds of brisket,but I think it'll be worth it in trimming and slicing work. Plus, muscle ways more than fat, right, so this leaner cut ought to be close in protein value. The meats chilling for easy slicing right now, and I've got ideas for the marinate this time.
I'm going to mince some garlic, toss it 1/2 cup of dark soy, bring to a boil and simmer for five minutes to bring the garlic flavour out of the garlic, then add probably 1/8 cup each of hot rooster sauce and honey, tasting and adjusting up to 1/4 of either as seems necessary.
Drying procedure will be the same, but I will cut the strips a little thicker this time because they didn't need to be so thin as I had them last week. Also I will avoid slicing up piddly pieces because they are not worth the hassle on the racks.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 24 Jul 2010, 23:36
It's 4:30pm and I started cooking a stew for dinner at 3:00. I will show pictures when it is done! Hooray!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 25 Jul 2010, 07:49
My mum makes macarons and sells them at the farmer's market at Exhibition Park in Canberra every Saturday morning, along with my brother who makes lemon tarts and brownies and the like. She's been doing it since the beginning of this year and apparently they're a real pain in the arse. But she's got them down pat now and they're amazing! They got a cover story in the food lift-out of the Canberra Times this week.

Um, anyway, so I guess the moral of the story is that you you should try and try again til you get it right.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 25 Jul 2010, 10:05
Hey Johnny buy me a smoker?

you can get them for like a hundred bucks (a hundred i don't have)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 25 Jul 2010, 10:44
Man Australian macarons look way better than the macaroons I was thinking of. Typically I think of chocolate macaroons, or coconut macaroons, but those macaroons look pretty great.
I've been making meringues semi-frequently so I guess the difference is that your macarons have almond in them, a slightly different method of production, and delicious in between two of them. I will give those a shot soon.


p.s. goddamn this new jerky marinade is much better than last time's soy & red wine. I am going to up the black pepper and garlic and maybe a bit more honey.


p.p.s if using a sweet marinade, avoid putting meat directly on trays. The scrappy bits I just threw on a tray this time, but the sauce still on them burnt on the tray and left them with a little bit of a burnt taste. It wasn't a problem last time because the sauce wasn't sweet, but this time the scraps got a little burny. Cooling racks on trays work fine but I only have one cooling rack.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 25 Jul 2010, 15:48
James, they're actually French.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macaron
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jhocking on 25 Jul 2010, 18:41
My fiancee is making homemade jam right now, yum yum!

I went over to take a big whiff. That was kinda dumb, because I might have burned the inside of my nose.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: De_El on 28 Jul 2010, 17:22
Tried to figure out what to eat, despite the dwindling food supplies in my house

found some green onions that were still good, and most of a carrot

hey what are these peanuts? hmmm

sauté that shit and eat it with rice! In sichuan, preferably.

basically rice, soy sauce and sriracha make most random assortments of food I've got left in my house palatable
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Emaline on 04 Aug 2010, 08:48
My whole house smells like meat!



I am making jerky. The box fan way. I have high hopes for this stuff.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 04 Aug 2010, 09:29
I actually had Macarons at Ladurée (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laduree) when I went to Paris last year. Other than feeling the most out of place I've ever felt anywhere, the macarons were actually pretty good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 26 Aug 2010, 20:36
So I just made my very first attempt at cooking ACTUAL FOOD in my ACTUAL APARTMENT (the latter may be a slight over-exaggeration, it's really a glorified dorm)

Wanted to keep it simple, so I got some chicken breast and sautéed it in olive oil and lemon and butter and garlic. It was really pretty tasty but my mom and girlfriend got me paranoid about undercooked meat so I ended up overdoing it a little and it came out a bit dry. I also made my own salad, but that was just shredded lettuce and some onions and cheese that I happened to have on hand. Still, I'm kinda proud about my first entirely self-made meal.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 26 Aug 2010, 21:06
Congratulations! I'm always proud when I do a meal from scratch 'cause I'm super lazy in the kitchen these days.

Chicken is easy to overcook when you're doing it on a pan but what I figured out is if you cook with a lid on the pan (even if it doesn't fit perfectly) the juices all pretty much stay inside and the heat retains better so you get a juicy bit 'o chook without the worry that it's too pink inside (and a little bit of light pink juice is seriously ok, as long as you can like... see the fibres? if you get what I mean?). Then you can even let it rest in the pan with the lid still on to let the juices do their thing while you plate up the rest of the meal.
Also if you are really super unsure if it's cooked, dig into the breast a little with a knife in the fleshiest part and pry it open a tiny bit. Also don't be afraid to press on the meat with your finger, over time you will grow to learn what 'done' meat feels like.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 27 Aug 2010, 06:11
From "I Like Food, Food Tastes Good", a recipe purportedly from Michael Dahlquist of Silkworm fame, which I am posting as it may be of interest to certain parties hereabouts.

CHEESY SLEAZY
Ingredients: an onion, some red or green peppers, maybe some sausage and other stuff to throw in there, if you've got it
two cans of refried beans
cheddar cheese
6 eggs
4 pieces of toast

Directions: 1. In a wide, deep pan, sauté your onions, peppers, sausage, etc. until they're cooked all to hell.
2. Dump in the refried beans, and stir.
3. Cover the beans with slices of cheddar cheese, and cover the pan with a lid.
4. Fry the eggs over easy or sunny-side up (3 per person).
5. Toast the toast.
6. Place the 2 pieces of toast on a plate. Put the eggs on the toast. Then dump the Cheesy Sleazy on top of the eggs (half the pan per person).

Meant to serve 2
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 04 Sep 2010, 19:55
Was making burritos tonight and decided to experiment with the rest of the chicken breast I had. My roommates have been eating all my food lately, so I have have vowed that in retribution I'm going to do everything I can to use up the 3 cases of soda they bought the one time they went to the store. I ended up making Habanero Cola Chicken, and was seriously surprised with how tasty it was.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 04 Sep 2010, 21:02
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/food%20eating/glomps.jpg)
homlomlomnomnomnom

There is a grilled cheese sandwich with a side of kielbasa sausage, roasted veg, and tomatoes. There is glompy-glomp gravy all over the place. It was real good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 08 Sep 2010, 15:03
My garden is finally producing (massive) tomatoes!
(http://a.imageshack.us/img72/9978/tomatod.jpg)
To celebrate, I made caprese salad:
(http://a.imageshack.us/img338/8900/tomatolunch.jpg)

For dinner I tried to replicate a chicken pie I had at a restaurant.  It didn't come out the same, but it is still tasty. 
(http://a.imageshack.us/img838/2779/chickenpie.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 08 Sep 2010, 15:17
Oh, I'm jealous... my garden's mostly been producing cherry tomatoes so far this year.  That looks so good!

Other than getting the kind of variety that can produce such massive fruit, are there any tricks to getting good tomatoes, in the pruning or something?  I kind of just let my plants grow as big as they possibly can get on their own, with the thought that more flowers=more fruit.  But maybe that's misguided.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 11 Sep 2010, 21:09
I think it is just the variety.  I just plant them and forget them, with maybe weeding them once or twice and watering them if it dosen't rain for a while. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 12 Sep 2010, 12:11
caprese salad slays and one of my biggest mistakes food-wise this year was when in chicago i bought a stupid amount of like not-great prosciutto as lunch meat
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: cheesepie on 15 Sep 2010, 11:13
ok you know when you have butter and white wine, and you bring it to a nice boil and then reduce the heat and put a chicken breast in
ok well if you let that shit cook and then after you take the chicken out theres a powder you can add to make that sauce thicker... its not baking soda but its one of those things does anyone know what im talking about? Would be helpful, I wanna do exactly what i just described
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 15 Sep 2010, 11:16
Cornstarch, arrowroot and flour all thicken sauces.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: look out! Ninjas! on 19 Sep 2010, 04:09
Roasted a leg of lamb today, put it in the oven at 7:15 and took it out at 6:30. Coated it with garlic, cumin and lemon zest on Friday. Also made some tabouleh to go with it. Instead of slicing it like I normally would I just ripped into it with a couple of forks and it came apart so easily. It was so delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 28 Sep 2010, 03:29
Hey Johnny buy me a smoker?

you can get them for like a hundred bucks (a hundred i don't have)
http://www.naffziger.net/blog/2008/07/05/the-alton-brown-flower-pot-smoker/
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 11 Oct 2010, 23:47
Heh heh, "pot smoker"
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 11 Oct 2010, 23:52
I bought some smoked eel from the farmer's market on Saturday on the principle that (A) one of my most treasured food memories involved eel, and (B) sometimes you should try cooking with something you've never cooked before. Seeing as how we're in the middle of spring here I'm thinking of making a warm salad with the eel, some broad beans, some baby peas, some baby carrots, some asparagus, and some rocket. Maybe I'll raid the fridge and toss a few capers and shave some parmesan through there, too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Oct 2010, 16:20
oh jesus fucking christ I just whipped up some maple meringue and goddamn is this shit ever delicious. I swear a lot when I feel regular language does not give enough punch to descriptions, and I have deleted two cuss words from that sentence there in the interests of common decency but that is how excited I am over this.

I just took my italian meringue recipe and instead of boiling up some sugar syrup, I boiled maple syrup and let-me-tell-you this is the best tasting shit so far. Light fluffy meringue with this ridiculously delicious maple thing going on and because it was made with the boiled syrup it is edible as-is (oh no oh no oh no) and it is tempting just to take the leftover meringue right now, fold it with whipped cream, and just mold it for eating.
Presently I've got 19 meringue cookies baking out in the oven, and I think that used up about half the batter, so were looking at material costs of maybe three or four bucks in ingredients. Apparently you mark up maybe 300-400% from your material costs to cover labour and overheads and whatever, so which I think means these could be sold for a dollar? That is excessively reasonable, I think, for a fucking maple meringue, assuming the dried cookies taste as near as good as this amazing meringue base.


My mum makes macarons and sells them at the farmer's market at Exhibition Park in Canberra every Saturday morning

Out of curiosity, if I can ask, do you know what her mark-up is over the ingredient costs here?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 22 Oct 2010, 21:22
I'm not sure but I'll ask her next time I talk to her. If it's not a trade secret or something, I dunno.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 24 Oct 2010, 18:55
Hey thread.

Bananas. I have some. What do?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 24 Oct 2010, 20:23
Are they getting mushy?  If so, banana bread (http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/banana-banana-bread/Detail.aspx) (with chocolate chips, if you like!) or some kind of banana smoothie (http://allrecipes.com/Search/Recipes.aspx?WithTerm=banana%20smoothie) may be your best bet.

If they're still firm, my favorite thing to do with bananas is to take a big spoonful of peanut butter, slice them, and dip the slices in the peanut butter.  Not cooking, really, but so good...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 24 Oct 2010, 23:39
=Bananas. I have some. What do?

Banana custard; no option.  With a bit of whipped cream if you're feeling fancy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 25 Oct 2010, 02:20
They're firm for now, but the only open counter space is on top of the fridge and I know I'm gonna forget about them up there. I do have some chocolate chips too...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 25 Oct 2010, 19:40
Hey guys, I found this site (http://www.supercook.com) the other day. It's great for those days you're looking at what you have and you're going "now what the hell can I cook with this shit?"
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 27 Oct 2010, 12:24
I like my mushy bananas in a milkshake. Just throw it in a blender with some vanilla ice cream. It tastes like cinnamon!

I could use some advice on popcorn myself. Half of the fun is popping it yourself, of course, so I always buy packets of unpopped corn and throw some in a pan with a lump of butter. The first time I did that, I dunked the whole 400g packet in a big soup pan like an idiot with no sense of expansion of volume, which made decent popcorn but 3/4 of it remained blackened and unpopped. Since then I found out that a good way to get all of it to pop is to cover the bottom of the pan in one layer of corn, and this usually fills it up entirely. Regardless, about half of my popcorn comes out slightly scorched, and even though it still tastes like popcorn it could be better. Who can tell me how to make my popcorn stay crisp and white?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 27 Oct 2010, 15:50
I have bought ingredients for mushroom korma and, come hell or high water, I am cooking it tomorrow! I was going to cook it today but I didn't have time.

My question is this: the recipe calls for me to mix my own spices but I am too lazy and already possess a jar of korma paste which contains almost all the spices listed (I've bought the rest). How does curry paste work?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 27 Oct 2010, 19:52
Sam made a fantastic pasta w/ olive oil garlic, capsicum, mushrooms, zucchini, and soy parmesan and then my big dumb ass stepped in and literally dumped a whole bunch of salt in and completely ruined everything, guess who sucks
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 27 Oct 2010, 20:16
I made amazing soup tonight guys, just lentils and rice and potatoes and onion boiled in some vegetable stock with cayenne and a little garlic!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 28 Oct 2010, 13:24
Mmmmm mushroom korma. Totally worth it. Even if it was kinda cheating to use paste, it was goooooood. And I have leftovers for tomorrow!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 28 Oct 2010, 20:50
Hey thread.

Bananas. I have some. What do?
this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8apX17SGY-0). It's one of the only desserts from Alton that is really fucking amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 28 Oct 2010, 21:19
What Am I Going To Do With All These Green Onions
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: beat mouse on 28 Oct 2010, 21:32
scallions, potatoes, bacon, souppppppp
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jimbunny on 29 Oct 2010, 06:39
Eat 'em raw, with dip. Like a party veggie platter, except you don't have to worry about no one talking to you the rest of the evening because you have such horribly bad breath.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 29 Oct 2010, 23:47
yesterday i made them into a quesadilla, today i sliced some new potatoes fairly thin and fried them and tossed chives in at the very end (THIS WAS DELICIOUS BTW) and tomorrow i'm going to make an omlet w/ chives, fill it with grated romano & tomato, and then top it with prosciutto
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 30 Oct 2010, 00:10
I just made a loaf of focaccia from scratch for the first time ever.

Oh god so good I ate half of it straight away while it was still oven-warm.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 30 Oct 2010, 10:30
I read this article (http://www.calgaryherald.com/life/Church+Crust+Crumb/3675874/story.html) and I can't wait til I have a kitchen of my own in which to bake bread.

I'm always really drawn to people who are this batshit dedicated to something seemingly simple and benign.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 31 Oct 2010, 10:45
HAPPY BREAKFASTTIME BITCHES

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs1128.snc4/149047_510971029022_122100375_30454675_54416_n.jpg)

sauteed some chives and then poured in a mix of three eggs and some buttermilk, tossed in some diced tomato and a large handful of grated romano cheese, omletted that shit, topped it with in-house cured prosciutto i got from the italian deli and then added garnish. breakfast motherfuckers
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 31 Oct 2010, 11:24
When last I was in Fredericton we hit this breakfast place at the market and they did me a good fry up like that plus loads of smoked salmon on top.
Goddamn smoked salmon w/bagel and cream cheese is so much what I want right now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 01 Nov 2010, 00:51
Wento to Costco today, bought a fuckload of beef mince + chicken breast. Suggesting things to do with those NOW
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 01 Nov 2010, 01:07
REANIMATE THE CHICKEN

FORCE-FEED THE BEEF MINCE TO THE ZOMBIE CHICKEN

RE-KILL THE CHICKEN

ENJOY YOUR COW-FLAVOURED CHICKEN

PLAY GOD
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 01 Nov 2010, 01:15
I mean aside from the obvious things, Harry
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 02 Nov 2010, 09:16
never a bad idea to refine yr skills with the basics, dovey
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 03 Nov 2010, 15:06
Question for you cooking types. When you are told to brown some meat, specifically chicken, how long should it brown for? Because I was told to brown some chicken and then bake it for 8 minutes (the temp wasn't listed on the recipe, so I tried 350). Took it out and it was definitely raw. I put them back in the oven on 400 and I'm going to check on them after about 20min. So I'm guessing that either I didn't brown them long enough or the temp wasn't high enough. (Probably didn't brown them long enough, which is why I'm asking you guys.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Nov 2010, 16:28
I can't imagine baking for 8 minutes doing anything useful at any temperature unless you were making cookies.
I'm sure your browning was fine, try looking up another similar recipe that might have a specific heat and longer time given.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 03 Nov 2010, 20:23
Cooking it at 400 for 20 min finished it up nicely, though the ham mozzarella I put on it was rather well done when I took it out. (I was making this (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/paulas-baked-ham-and-cheese-chicken-recipe/index.html).) In hindsight, I should have cooked it all the way through, not browned it, because you only want to bake it long enough to melt the cheese. I mean, it was still good, but I'm sure it'd be better if done properly. Next time...

This weekend, though, I am making my grandmother's recipe for beef paprika and I'm so excited...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 03 Nov 2010, 23:02
Yeah – that recipe wanted you to cook the chicken all the way through, I think, and then top it with the ham and mozza. But the problem with that, as far as I can tell, is that you can dry your chicken out really easily.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Nov 2010, 23:05
I've made a similar thing plenty of times with napolitana sauce and cheese on top. If your chicken is crumbed well enough it should be fine, also the sauce/cheese helps keep it moist.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 04 Nov 2010, 12:51
Wait are we just talking about good ole fashioned chicken parmigiana? What you wanna do is pound them chicken TITTAYS flat, that'll help.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 04 Nov 2010, 13:50
you just wanted an excuse to use that word didn't you
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 06 Nov 2010, 14:25
My grandmother's recipe of beef paprika is cooking right now! Chopping the onions and garlic brutalized my eyes, but now it smells so good. I can't wait to eat it in....2 hours. Want.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 08 Nov 2010, 10:07
Linds, you're going to give me that recipe, right?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: öde on 08 Nov 2010, 10:56
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash2/hs491.ash2/76400_458201549787_575839787_5305685_6409677_n.jpg)

Thai-style veggie curry. Unfortunately I didn't read up on how to prepare lemongrass so it's got a few hard bits in it :( Absolutely delicious apart from that though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: blanktom on 16 Nov 2010, 12:36
Last weekend our local Tesco had whole free range chickens reduced to £1.55 because they were going out of date that day. We got 2, took one home and roasted it, and froze the other.

I defrosted the second one and today I rather proudly stood over my girlfriend and showed her how to butcher it up for the first time, she got 2 amazing fillets! It was a bit pointless, because we then diced all the meat and she made a curry, but she got to learn! Anyway the curry was tasty as shit, but my girlfriend always cooks way to much rice.

What I'm really chuffed with is my rice pudding! So I heated the leftover rice with some whole milk until the rice softened back up, then stirred in the leftover coconut milk and about 3 tablespoons of sugar and brought to the boil, then I added like a teaspoon of ground nutmeg and the same of cinamon. Kept that shit boiling until the liquid has been absorbed and served myself a bowlful of that shit, and damn yo, it was tasty. I'm thinking a dollop of strawberry jam in that would have been awesome.

So yeah. Don't do this if the rice has been sitting around for like a day, but if its leftover from the dinner you just had, you should be safe kids!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 16 Nov 2010, 21:24
I always thought rice pudding, like fried rice, was supposed to be made with day old rice? Am I wrong then?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 16 Nov 2010, 21:27
Naw, you're right Kat. Just don't leave it sitting out uncovered to get all weird and crunchy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 19 Nov 2010, 02:59
I prepared and cooked fresh artichokes for the first time ever yesterday! I feel like I've come of age in some way. Okay, granted, they were only baby artichokes so none of them had developed a choke which had to be removed, but still, there was a lot of removing of leaves and cutting of spines involved. But then they were delicious at the end of it all! They tasted just like artichokes from a jar but I made them all by myself!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 19 Nov 2010, 03:22
So this is so simple it barely qualifies as cooking, but like last week I took a bunch of chopped onions leftover from burrito night and caramelized them up with some olive oil and a pinch of brown sugar. I am not used to my meals taking almost an hour to prepare, but it made some pretty average pulled pork into a freakin fantastic pita.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 19 Nov 2010, 03:39
Linds, you're going to give me that recipe, right?

I can, yeah! When I'm more awake, anyways.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 06 Dec 2010, 13:57

I defrosted the second one and today I rather proudly stood over my girlfriend and showed her how to butcher it up for the first time, she got 2 amazing fillets!

Kudos.

Just finished making some stock with some left over roasting carcasses. Going to reduce it down before making a nice cream gravy for a chicken & ham pie.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 06 Dec 2010, 14:21
For thanksgiving I made buttermilk biscuits.  I had leftover buttermilk and I made waffles with it.   Why, WHY, WHY have I been using a mix my whole life.  I love waffles from a mix, but this, this was heaven.   
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ethney on 07 Dec 2010, 06:43
Last night I made sour cream sugar cookies all by myself, and they actually came out great!

This is how I made them, but you can edit it how you want. (ex: more flour, less sugar, less salt, add baking powder, whatever you like.)
I somehow lost my vanilla extract, and was all out of baking powder(my recipe called for 2tsp)...but it worked out :)

Recipe:
5c flour (sifted)
2tsp baking soda
1c shortening (i like the butter flavored crisco)
2c sugar
2 eggs slightly beaten
1c sour cream
1tsp salt
2tsp vanilla

Mix together shortening+sugar+eggs+vanilla.
In separate bowl mix sour cream+baking soda (It will fluff up, which is pretty cool)
Add the sour cream mixture in with the the rest of the ingredients and finally add the sifted flour.
Let chill in the fridge for about a half hour or longer especially if you want to make cut outs

Bake in 350 degree oven for about 10-12 minutes or until lightly brown

*If you aren't making cut outs, I recommend taking the cookie batter and making dough balls so they come out really round and pretty

Let cool, then add frosting and sprinkles!
(http://i53.tinypic.com/1zv3h8w.jpg)  (http://i56.tinypic.com/15dudy0.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 07 Dec 2010, 10:11
CINNAMON BUNS
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: leahneedsanap on 08 Dec 2010, 09:15
For thanksgiving I made buttermilk biscuits.  I had leftover buttermilk and I made waffles with it.   Why, WHY, WHY have I been using a mix my whole life.  I love waffles from a mix, but this, this was heaven.   

Oh man I bet they were delicious.

I spent most of college trying to convince my friends it was dumb to buy pancake mix instead of a bag of flour and some baking powder, but it mostly just ended up with me making all the pancakes/waffles.  Then someone came home with one of those bottles of bisquick you pour water in, shake up, and pour out like it was fabric softener, and I abandoned all hope.  Whatever, MORE PANCAKES FOR ME.

The best thing about homemade waffles is putting toasted nuts or fruiit in them. Om nom nom.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 08 Dec 2010, 09:24
I made shrimp last night for the first time ever. Two different kinds. They were pretty alright. Also made a porcini risotto, and a salad.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 08 Dec 2010, 09:42
i'm making fried chicken, i'm using buttermilk, in conclusion fuck you
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 08 Dec 2010, 09:52
Is that a fuck you because we don't get to have any?


Because honestly I was just starting to think about going to KFC.


Your shit sounds way tighter though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 08 Dec 2010, 10:38
no it's because people keep telling me not to use buttermilk, they're like "just dredge it in flour"
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 08 Dec 2010, 10:40
Dude those people are fucking retarded.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 08 Dec 2010, 11:13
Who are these people? Home-made fried chicken isn't worth making unless buttermilk is involved.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: valley_parade on 08 Dec 2010, 11:36
Leave it to Canadians to try and ruin fried chicken.

No buttermilk? Seriously, JC, who are they?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 08 Dec 2010, 12:12
chris onstad says no buttermilk!!!! and a guy i know from nashville

(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs778.snc4/67860_511473372322_122100375_30463880_3653505_n.jpg)

look how wrong they were.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 08 Dec 2010, 13:15
Alton Brown uses buttermilk. And probably Paula Deen.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 08 Dec 2010, 13:35
MotherFUCK I want fried chicken so bad.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 08 Dec 2010, 14:32
This spring I have started doing two things for the first time:

1) Preparing and cooking fresh artichokes;

2) Making caramel.

Both are a lot easier and more straight-forward than their reputation suggests! So far I have yet to combine them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 08 Dec 2010, 14:34
Never have any buttermilk left over after making muffins...

In other news, I made a kick-ass chickpea curry earlier this week.  I made it too hot for my wife, so ended up throwing in some cauliflower and small pieces of some rather boring wild boar sausages as well; it was excellent.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: valley_parade on 09 Dec 2010, 08:22
Alton Brown uses buttermilk. And probably Paula Deen.

Paula Deen probably just uses whatever "butteryall" is.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 09 Dec 2010, 08:29
Inlander, is that Jerusalem or Globe?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 09 Dec 2010, 14:35
Globe.

The first ones I did were just babies, so they hadn't developed a choke yet. Subsequently I've been using adult ones and there's been a hell of a lot of fluff to dig out from the middle.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 09 Dec 2010, 15:13
i found goose
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 10 Dec 2010, 01:35
Globe.

The first ones I did were just babies, so they hadn't developed a choke yet. Subsequently I've been using adult ones and there's been a hell of a lot of fluff to dig out from the middle.

Yeah, the effort to reward is a fine balance with them. Are you doing them with a Hollandaise sauce?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 10 Dec 2010, 08:16
i found goose

hell yeah
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SonofZ3 on 12 Dec 2010, 09:12
For Sunday Dinner at the Morell/Cerar Household this Dec. 12.

Roast, corn, and garlic mashed potatoes.

Roast-
In a crock pot, mix-
1/4 cup red wine
1 cup water
1/4 cup ketchup
1 package au jus gravy mix
tablespoon sweet mustard
tablespoon worchestishire sauce.
whisk together above ingredients. Add chopped sweet onions to taste, or whole peeled pearl onions.
Add roast, cook on high 2hrs, low 5-6 ,more hrs, until meat falls apart with fork. stir sauce and turn meat every hour or so.

Garlic Mashed potatoes-
Peel potatoes and garlic. There should be about a 4/1 ratio between garlic and potatoes. Chunk and boil together, this takes a lot of the potency out of the garlic.
Drain and mash cooked potatoes and garlic together with 1/4 stick of butter, and a small ammount of half and half. Mix in 4oz. sour cream, 4oz. heluva good french onion dip, and some grated parmesean cheese. Take 2 eggs and beat in a seperate bowl, add about 1/4 cup of your mashed potatoes to the egg and mix together. Fold the egg/potato mixture into your bowl of mashed potatoes and mix completely. Transfer to cassarole dish and bake at 350 for an hour and a half, until top of potatoes are beginning to be browned.

Corn- Take frozen corn out of bag, heat up.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 12 Dec 2010, 10:11
last night i braised lamb shanks and here's how i did it

3-4 shanks
1 onion
2 carrots, cut into 3-inch quartered staves
2 stalks of celery, same as above
4 cloves garlic
2 tsp tomato paste
2 bottles stout or porter
1 cup-ish chicken or beef stock
rosemary
thyme
bay leaf
parsley

preheat an oven to 500 degrees. coat the shanks lightly with vegetable oil and place them in a dutch oven. put the dutch oven in the preheated oven for approximately five minutes, or until the heat gives the shanks a nice sear. alternatively you can sear the shanks over the stove, about five minutes a side on medium-high heat, if you aren't afraid of smoke. either way, once the shanks have a sear, remove them from the dutch oven and set them aside.

the recipe i followed said to drain the grease and add vegetable oil. don't do that, it's dumb. instead, toss your onions and garlic right into that rendered fat and soak up the dense lamb flavour. it adds richness to the braising liquid you'll soon be making. saute them over medium-low heat for five minutes or until they turn kind of translucent, and then add the other aromatic veggies and the tomato paste. IF YOU DON'T HAVE ANY TOMATO PASTE then use marc's trick over at no recipes (http://norecipes.com/2010/09/26/pizza-margherita-recipe/) - steam a tomato or two and push their guts through the bottom of a decent-sized strainer using a pestle or the back end of a spoon. you can also probably just plop a diced tomato in, though you'll want to maybe gut the seeds from it if you can.

anyways. saute those veggies for another five minutes and use a wooden spoon to stir them around and scrape the bottom of the oven to get all the browned bits down there up and into the veggies. once five minutes have passed put the shanks over top of the sauteed vegetables and cover them with a bottle of beer, the stock, and enough of the second bottle of beer that it just covers the top of the uppermost shank. bring it to a simmer over high heat; while you're waiting, take all the herbs except the rosemary and find a way to get them into the dutch oven. ideal is you're using fresh herbs and can just tie them together securely with kitchen twine. if you're not you can make a little cheesecloth pouch for the loose dried herbs and the bay leaf and then plop the pouch into the broth. if you don't have cheesecloth, just toss the herbs in. when you're dealing with the braising liquid later you'll have to strain all the herbs out but you're gonna have to live with that.

once it's simmering and you've got all your herbs in there, pop a lid on it, turn the heat down fairly low, and let it braise for about two to three hours (it took me about an hour and forty five minutes, honestly, but the longer they go the more tender they'll be). the shanks are ready once you can pull the meat apart using a fork with little to no effort. the rosemary is added in the last ten minutes; check the shanks for doneness and, when they're done, pop in the rosemary and let it go for another ten minutes. it's not like they'll suddenly get tough.

pull the shanks out very gently and set them under foil to keep warm. turn the heat up and bring the braising liquid to a boil until its volume reduces to whatever consistency you desire. strain it into a tureen. untent the shanks, dish out whatever sides (i made roast potatoes and steamed broccoli) and pour a healthy ladle or two of the braising liquid over top of each shank. serve.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 13 Dec 2010, 22:16
Tonight I made banana-coconut tapioca pudding.  It rocks.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Dec 2010, 22:28
i pan-seared a fucking duck breast today. duck, you assholes. do you understand me? i pan-seared it, and then i added a couple of my brandied cherries, and then i put on some of the preserving liquid and broiled the underside of the duck so that it was glazed nicely and richer in flavour, and then i paired it with a spinach salad w/ walnut, raisin and thin-sliced apple. my life owns
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 13 Dec 2010, 22:47
Is that because you wussed out on cooking the goose?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Dec 2010, 22:51
no i just need to buy one but i found multiple goose sources
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 13 Dec 2010, 22:58
I hope you all appreciate my restraint in avoiding using the term "chickened out" in connection with the cooking or not cooking of poultry.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Dec 2010, 23:20
no cryin foul here
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SonofZ3 on 14 Dec 2010, 07:03
Test batch of Cranberry Pistachio cookies in the oven!

Sorry, no avian jokes!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 Dec 2010, 10:18
Test batch of Cranberry Pistachio cookies in the oven!

Sorry, no avian jokes!

really laid an egg on this post
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 14 Dec 2010, 13:56
Are you doing them with a Hollandaise sauce?

No. I've cooked a couple of recipes from the Silver Spoon with them (because that cookbook's fantastic when you don't have a lot of money): one where they were fried after being marinated for a couple of hours and then dipped in flour and egg to make a simple batter (that was delicious) and another where they were baked on top of a later of potato wedges (also delicious). I've also made tossed them through pasta a couple of times along with other springy ingredients. I stirred some of the leaves that weren't really suitable for battering and frying through some left-over risotto I had once and that really perked it up. I dunno, a couple of other things I can't remember.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SonofZ3 on 15 Dec 2010, 06:59
Cranberry Pistachio cookies, make these people. seriously

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 sticks (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, softened
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon finely grated fresh orange zest
1/2 cup shelled pistachios (2 1/4 oz. not dyed red)
1/3 cup dried cranberries (1 1/4 oz.)
1 large egg, lightly beaten
1/4 cup decorative sugar (preferably coarse)
parchment paper
 
Make Dough:  stir together flour, cinnamon, and salt in a bowl.
Beat together butter, granulated sugar, and zest in a large bowl with an electirc mixer at medium high speed until pale and fluffy, about 3 minutes.  Reduce speed to low and add flour mixture in 3 batches, mixing until dough just comes together in clumps, then by hand mix in pistachios and cranberries. 
 
(This can all be done by hand but it's a little more labor intensive.)  If you have a hand mixer that will definitely work best.
 
Gather and press dough together, then divide into 2 equal pieces.  Using a sheet of plastic wrap or wax paper as an aid, form each piece of dough into a log about 1 1/2 inches in diameter.  Square off long sides of each log to form a bar, then chill, wrapped in plastic wrap, until very firm, at least 2 hours.
 
Slice and back cookies:
 
put oven racks in upper and lower thirds of oven and preheat oven to 350 degrees F.  Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.  Brush egg over all 4 long sides of bars (but not ends).  Sprinkle decorative sugar on a separate sheet of parchment or wax paper and press b ars into sugar, coating well.  Cut each bar crosswise into 1/4 inch thick slices, rotating bar after cutting each slice to help keep square shape.   Use a very sharp knife so the pistachios are cut clean.   (If dough gets too soft to slice, freeze bars briefly until firm.)  Arrange cookies about 1/2 inch apart on lined baking sheets.
 
Bake cookies, switching position of sheets halfway thorugh baking, until edges are pale brown, 15 to 18 minutes total.  Transfer cookies to racks pulling the parchment off the cookie sheet.  Cool completely.
 
COOKS NOTES:  Dough bars can be  chilled up to 3 days or frozen, wrapped in plastic wrap and then foil, 1 month (thaw frozen dough in refrigerator just until dough can be sliced).  Cookies keep in an airtight container at room temperature 5 days.)

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 05 Jan 2011, 19:46
(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v59/broken_hero/DSC06225.jpg)

This is the pie I made! The crust is flour, shortening and water. The filling is 5 McIntosh apples, a pint of raspberries, 3/4c white sugar, 1/4 flour, and a tablespoon of lemon juice. Crust is brushed with egg yolk and whipping cream, baked at 375C for 75 minutes. I covered the top with foil for the first hour to keep it from browning too quickly.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 05 Jan 2011, 20:05
4:20 caramelise onions everyday
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 05 Jan 2011, 20:29
nooo everyone is going to miss my pie go to the last page and look at my pie
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 05 Jan 2011, 21:08
that was a gorgeous pie, people. seriously, go look. i was particularly impressed by the lattice, and the idea of combining apples and strawberries.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 05 Jan 2011, 21:43
Oh jeez I wrote strawberries but actually I put a pint of raspberries in the filling! Whoops!

Also thank you Rosie that means a lot to me! This is the first pie I've made unsupervised by a seasoned pastry maker.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 05 Jan 2011, 23:16
1) that is a seriously bomb-lookin pie and lattices are Hard Work and Serious Business, so good freakin job

4:20 caramelise onions everyday

2) everyone post sweet onion tips. here's mine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 06 Jan 2011, 00:32
I don't have any sweet onion tips that you haven't already covered.

This is what I made for dinner tonight. Just for me. I made the ballz and the sauce from scratch but sadly not the pasta.
It was good.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5204/5329760610_520d2a7f91.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/slackadaisy/5329760610/)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KharBevNor on 06 Jan 2011, 00:40
Ok I could do with some suggestions for the upcoming term actually, because I really shouldn't eat out or get takeaways pretty much at all if I want to preserve my moneys.

Here's my situation: I live in a single room bedsit in a cheap seedy boarding house. My cooking equipment consists of a two-hob electric hotplate, a pop-up toaster, a kettle, a saucepan, a frying pan, some mugs, a wooden spoon and basic cutlery. That is it. I have no freezer or refridgerator, but I have been leaving like eggs and milk out in a plastic box on a little balcony I have whilst the weather is cold. So basically things which I can buy and use over the course of a couple of days tops are ideal. At the moment what I am mostly cooking myself is things such as irish stew (tinned steak chunks, stock cube in a mug of boiling water, chopped potatoes/onions/carrots/mushrooms/whatever I got, bit of guinness, then I drink the rest of the guinness whilst I am waiting for it to cook), boiled or egg fried rice with various things (for example tinned curry or some stir fry vegetables), omelettes, beans on toast, scrambled eggs on toast, tinned soup, boiled veg, fried potatoes...you get the picture. Anyone got any ideas for some interesting things I could try and cook with the following caveats: I don't like pasta or indeed most italian food except like pizza, can't stand whole tomatoes (really can't stand tinned tomatoes, so gross), anything where you can taste vinegar, mayonnaise, salad dressing, coleslaw, any pickled things and a bunch of other stuff I am probably forgetting. I am British though so I am fairly ok with like eating offal or fried blood or whatever.

Help a brother out. This could run to like suggestions of new utensils I should get as long as it's something cheap and small.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 06 Jan 2011, 00:46
You haven't mentioned fish.  You could vary the stew by using a chopped up haddock fillet (smoked if you fancy, or not), swapping the stock cube for a veggie one.

(Edit) As fish cooks faster than meat, chuck it in a few minutes before the end rather than cooking it the whole time, like meat.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 06 Jan 2011, 01:13
It could be worth getting a small fridge, second hand if you're expecting to be there for a while. Given that you're cooking on an electric hob as well as likely to suffer some food wastage, a fridge is likely to be economical in the long run. It also means that you can have a few more food options such as making pies and the like.

Make stews with ales and stouts instead of Guiness. A lot of people, myself included, mitigate this with some honey or sugar. You still get the excellent beery flavour. When I was in similar cooking circumstances, two books served me really well - Grub on a Grant and Peckish But Poor, both by Cas Clarke. I still refer to them from time to time, even though I'm no longer a student or of limited finances. The good news is that without a fridge, you can drastically reduce marinading times for meat.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 06 Jan 2011, 01:15
If you're using veggie stock cubes for fish stews, it can improve the flavour if you add a little thai fish sauce.

And to add my own culinary endeavours, tonight's dinner is horse dick.

Alright, actually it's pork tenderloin, but going on looks it does bear a passing resemblance to equine genitalia. Last night I chucked it in a tub with a bay leaf, some salt, dried parsley, chives and rosemary, a bit of pepper and teaspoon of whole grain mustard and then covered it with a bottle of cider. Gave it a quick shake and a turn this morning and now trying to decide between pan-frying and braising when I get home.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 06 Jan 2011, 01:17
Eggs don't need to be refridgerated, and you should be able to buy packs of tiny single-serve UHT milks at the supermarket (or steal them from McDonalds).

I basically survive on pasta so I won't be much help with recipes, I'm afraid.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 06 Jan 2011, 01:32
UHT milk is pretty grim and, from experience, terrible for cooking with.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 06 Jan 2011, 01:56
Eh, I've survived on UHT, if only for putting in your tea and baking with.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KharBevNor on 06 Jan 2011, 04:28
I don't generally have any problems with milk, I buy it by the litre normally and keep it outside, and it works fine. I have debated the worth of a small fridge myself, but I'm only probably going to be here till march/april, and I want to be able to move out in the space of a couple of big backpacks. Stuff like the toaster and kettle only cost £5 and I'll give them to a charity shop probably.

I've never had fish stew. I'll give it a go, I'm quite keen on white fish. I'll keep on the look out for some inexpensive stuff.

You don't have to refridgerate eggs? Really? That's nuts! I always get really paranoid about eggs because when I did cooking in school I got a rotten egg and cracked it in to the cake I was making and the whole thing was turned into a foul ruin. It upset me greatly! To this day I always crack eggs individually into a mug before cooking them, just on the off-chance.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 06 Jan 2011, 14:17
If you get them in a carton they should have a use-by date on top, sometimes it's even printed on the individual egg. As long as you stay in that you should be fine, but the cracking it into a mug first is still a good idea.
I just googled and I can't find a good indicator for how long you can keep eggs out of the fridge (most are from the US where there is a big salmonella thing in eggs and people are going nuts), but we used to keep chickens and left the eggs out for weeks at a time. If you just buy a pack of 6 and have one a day you should be fine, seriously.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KharBevNor on 06 Jan 2011, 14:57
I suppose it's just that my family always kept eggs in the fridge.

I never trust use by dates. I use my nose. If I ain't gagging, shits getting ate. I have a pretty strong immune system anyway from growing up in the country and picking my nose constantly and eating the snot and generally living in states of filth and squalor. I find stuff spoils a way before its supposed use by date just as often as stuff completely outlasts it, actually. I have all but given up trying to buy cheese on a budget because of how much I have seen turn into inedible plastic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 06 Jan 2011, 15:22
I have seen people at my uni hanging carrier bags containing yoghurts out of their window in cold weather, which seemed quite a good idea. Sadly won't work in summer but certainly would be fine now.

We have our eggs for weeks at a time, but they come straight out of the chicken and into the house so I guess that is not the same as shop-bought ones. If you store them upside down, with the pointy end down and the big bit up, they are meant to last longer - I think it is something to do with the air bubble in the bottom of each egg? I don't know if that is true though.

Cheese just doesn't last very well. We bought Sainsburys cheddar several times only to find that it was mouldy when we opened the packet, which is just appalling.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SonofZ3 on 06 Jan 2011, 16:54
Cut the mold off and eat the cheese anyway. Really. Doesn't hurt anything.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 06 Jan 2011, 17:05
Alli, come visit me and make me a pie!!!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 06 Jan 2011, 17:10
Cut the mold off and eat the cheese anyway. Really. Doesn't hurt anything.

Also, a lot of the time you'll see a fine white crust on cheese and you may think it's mould, but it's actually just the salt rising to the surface of the cheese. Not a thing wrong with the cheese at all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 07 Jan 2011, 00:28
And when the mould is blue, you buy it specially.

The market near me sells a particularly good mouldy cheddar, which they call "Yer 'Tiz".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Spluff on 07 Jan 2011, 00:45
You don't have to refridgerate eggs? Really? That's nuts! I always get really paranoid about eggs because when I did cooking in school I got a rotten egg and cracked it in to the cake I was making and the whole thing was turned into a foul ruin. It upset me greatly! To this day I always crack eggs individually into a mug before cooking them, just on the off-chance.

You can check whether an egg is off or not by putting it in a glass (or mug or pan or jug or whatever) of water. If it sinks it's fine, if it floats it's gone off.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 07 Jan 2011, 00:48
You can also spin it on its side, like a top. If it wobbles and you feel push when you stop it, it's fine. If it just stops, it's probably gone.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KharBevNor on 07 Jan 2011, 00:51
That totally sounds like a recipe for ending up with egg everywhere.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Spluff on 07 Jan 2011, 00:52
Isn't that to check if it's hard boiled? I don't know how that would determine whether it's off.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 07 Jan 2011, 01:36
It will do both, although presumably you would know if you had boiled it.

What happens is that the air bubble moves to the top until centralfugal force of spinning pushes it out to the ends. If the egg is off then the albumen will have congealed more and hold the air bubble at the top.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: blanktom on 07 Jan 2011, 16:30
Oh man, oh man.

I used to HATE HATE HATE mushrooms. Now, I am getting into them in a big way.

So I just got home a tad drunk and, whilst listening to some Bon Iver, did a thing. I had some chestnut mushrooms. I also had bacon. Heat olive oil in a pan and BAM add them mushrooms and bacon, mushrooms slices relatively thin, bacon chopped into cute little 1cm by 1cm squares. Add GARLIC FUCK I LOVE GARLIC. Let it all coooook. Then add some herbs, I threw in fresh rosemary and parsley (my next door neighbour has a massive rosemary bush in his front garden than I constantly steal from, and I had some parsley knocking about because I made risotto the other day). Once it is pretty much cooked, throw in a knob of butter and season with salt and pepper. The whole thing took me less than 10 minutes whilst I drank a glass of wine and danced around the kitchen, and was TASTY.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 07 Jan 2011, 18:02
so... you made fried mushrooms and bacon
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 07 Jan 2011, 20:13
this is the only cooking thread we got and there are grown men in the world who don't even know how to use their own microwaves, let the dude have his pride
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 07 Jan 2011, 20:30
I know a grown man who does not know how to do laundry. It is a choice. At home, his mom did it for him, and now, his girlfriend does it for him. Maybe they are married now, I don't know. At any rate, dude was an asshole.
Not that people who don't know how to cook are assholes but guys who make the conscious decision to never learn how to do laundry because there will always be a woman there to do it for him, they are assholes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 07 Jan 2011, 23:40
im just sad because he was so close to a balls-out amazing omelette but like quit halfway
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KharBevNor on 08 Jan 2011, 01:21
I am dissapoint
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: blanktom on 08 Jan 2011, 02:47
man i was drunk and i fuckin hate omelettes. why you gotta piss on me?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 08 Jan 2011, 12:32
Yeah Johnny, go to the hell. It might be simple but jesus shits are fried mushrooms with garlic and olive oil and like such as some green herbs just about one of the most splendid pleasures available to man. The fact that it's easy is just bonus.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: blanktom on 08 Jan 2011, 16:22
Don't worry though. I still love you, Johnny C.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 08 Jan 2011, 20:40
Man speaking of pretty basic things to fry up, do up some fresh tomatoes, zucchini, onions, garlic, and mushrooms to fry up with or without a bit of bacon and maybe some herbs and that shit is solid. That is my 'it is beginning to be fall and we are harvesting shit oh yeah' food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: blanktom on 09 Jan 2011, 07:52
All of that sounds amazing except the zuchinni...that's courgette right? I can't stand those things. I bet if you added some paprika and some chillis to that it'd make a shit hot little salsa/jumbolaya thing to throw in fajitas, on a salad with a dollop of sour cream...oh man, simple stuff like that is just so good for so many things.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Demonic Angel on 09 Jan 2011, 08:13
im just sad because he was so close to a balls-out amazing omelette but like quit halfway
I'm not patient enough for an amazing omelet, I always decide it should be ready to flip to soon, and then just go ahead and make scrambled eggs out of it. I guess that means I quit three-quarters in.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 09 Jan 2011, 10:03
Yeah Johnny, go to the hell. It might be simple but jesus shits are fried mushrooms with garlic and olive oil and like such as some green herbs just about one of the most splendid pleasures available to man. The fact that it's easy is just bonus.

it's tasty! but sauteed mushrooms in bacon are just... i dunno. they're something you put on top of or inside of something, to me. but when you are drunk, you make the food that you desire.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 09 Jan 2011, 11:25
I made my birthday cake on Friday - chocolate cake with raspberry whipped cream icing. It was delicious!
(http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/hs080.snc6/169082_10100139362538208_5700964_53734053_4333075_n.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 09 Jan 2011, 12:17
Got in a random mood this evening so jointed a chicken, stuck the legs and thighs in a casserole dish along with some mushrooms, squash, cauliflower, basil, chives, some fennel seeds, a couple of bay leaves, a couple of cloves, a large glass of white wine and some stock. Covered and gas five for a couple of hours and pretty tasty. a bit too much clove so next time maybe three instead of five.

Nat that there will be a next time as cooking the same thing twice is a pretty rare occurence for me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 Jan 2011, 12:35
Recipe requested from the Emergency Food thread.  First, pictures, as by coincidence I made it today:

(http://cassland.org/images/Ottolenghi-1.jpg) (http://cassland.org/images/Ottolenghi-2.jpg)

Start with 500g/1lb of sweet potatoes.  Peel and cut into 25mm/1" slices.  Lay these in a large pan (so they form a single layer), and add 4 tablespoons of honey and barely enough water to cover them (Ottolenghi adds 50g/2oz butter, but I'm not supposed to!).  Cook for 40-odd minutes.

While the sweet potatoes are cooking, take a finely chopped onion and fry with a teaspoon of cumin seeds and a teaspoon of coriander seeds until browned (Ottolenghi uses olive oil - I dry-fry it, boo), about 8mins.  Add a generous tablespoon of tomato purée, fry for another minute (you need to keep stirring here), then add a tin of skinned or chopped tomatoes (400g/140z), a teaspoon of sugar, and 1.5 teaspoons of ground cumin.  Cook for about five minutes, and season (I don't bother).  Stir in 100g/4oz baby spinach leaves (or similar), add a tin of chickpeas (400g/14oz - but Ottolenghi expects you to cook them yourself, starting with 200g dried chickpeas), and cook for a further five minutes.

During the last cooking, take 100g Greek yoghurt (but I use fat-free - boo again), and stir in juice of a lemon and a crushed clove of garlic.  Ottolenghi adds the zest of the lemon, 3 tablespoons of olive oil and a teaspoon of dried mint, and whisks it up - but I don't bother (no fat, see?).

Place the chickpea and sauce mixture in a dish, take the sweet potatoes (which should be soft by now) and lay them on top.  Garnish with coriander leaves and serve with the flavoured yoghurt/mayonnaise.

Serves 4 (Ottolenghi says 6, but that's a bit mean for a main course). 
We had two portions for supper, and I've put two in boxes for my lunch tomorrow and my wife's dinner (she'll be staying away somewhere with a microwave).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 09 Jan 2011, 12:44
Looks good. Far too shy to take pictures of my food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 09 Jan 2011, 16:22
Anybody know where I can get coriander root? Anybody?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 09 Jan 2011, 17:49
If you're buying coriander in bunches from a greengrocer (as opposed to a supermarket) ask if they have any with the roots still on. Often they just chop the roots off before they put it on display and they'll have some in the storeroom with the roots intact.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 09 Jan 2011, 21:36
I just wrote a kickass recipe for my meatballs!

Here it is. (http://tigerdarling.blogspot.com/2011/01/recipe-meatballs.html)

Oh and there's also my gingerbread men recipe a little ways down.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: vegkitkat on 10 Jan 2011, 14:04
I just made and consumed a delicious dinner.  Periogies (feta and spinach flavor-store bought, because I'm lazy) with onions, mushrooms, spinach and red peppers.  No pictures because it is in my belly.

Later, I'm going to cook some black bean soup to have over the coming weeks.  Also amazingly delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 14 Jan 2011, 15:25
I made bagels today from this recipe (http://hubpages.com/hub/Homemade_bagel_recipe_Make_great_nadrolled_water_bagels__its_as_easy_as_baking_a_loaf_of_bread).

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v321/NvrTooMuchPython/IMG_0845.jpg)

So good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SonofZ3 on 14 Jan 2011, 16:47
Went lazy today. Did venison fajitas. Cooked a couple packages of venison steaks in a simple marinade in the crock pot for 9 hours or so, until they just fell apart. The rest is pretty obvious, I'm sure people know what fajitas are.
I also found that I like to mix some honey with my corn when I'm heating it up. I think its really an improvement.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Beren on 14 Jan 2011, 22:48
-snip bagels-

This is wonderful. I can't stand the taste and feel of Lenders and such bagels from the store. This could be the trick.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 16 Jan 2011, 15:28
So OK so I had sweet potato & turkey pizza just now, was totally tops!
Years ago in Toronto I had this awesome potatos & cream pizza with heaps of rosemary and it was delicious delicious delicious and went exceptionally well with the local pilsner on tap. I have looked for recipes but never found anything that looked that great, until a week and a half ago, when, while trawling for interesting bread recipes, I came across an excellent looking recipe in an excellent looking book and said Hey I Will Do That.
I didn't do that then but yesterday I started some sourdough and then today decided that it would be pizza dough and then sliced my sweet potato paper thin, tossed it with salt to get it to give up some water, pressed em dry, tossed them with sliced onions, olive oil, lots of rosemary (dried unfortunately but hey it's winter), and some fried ground turkey. Threw that on two pizza crusts, one got covered in cheese (this one was better, potatoes steamed beautifully under their cheesey blanky) and one went without for Scientific Method.
All around awesome. So good. So pleased. So happy with dinner.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: StaedlerMars on 17 Jan 2011, 08:38
I made a ton of lasagne last night while watching the football. It was awesome, and now I have dinner for the next few days. I think I'm going to make this some sort of tradition. It's a shame there's only like two game weekends left.

Lasagne was pretty basic - vegetarian mince, chopped peppers, onions all lightly fried. Then a sauce of cream, worcester sauce, and ketchup (odd right, but it really works), and cheese added to each layer. It was really good, a bit dry, but I reckon that's because I didn't take into consideration that the vegetarian mince had no fat on it, so I think next time I'm just going to use a bit more olive oil, or a bit more cream.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 17 Jan 2011, 11:06
What does vegetarian mince consist of?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 17 Jan 2011, 11:29
probably textured vegetable protein.

this shit is awesome(http://125pounds.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/MSF-Meal-Starters-fake-beef.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: StaedlerMars on 17 Jan 2011, 11:36
Probably pretty much the same thing, but the British version:

(http://keetsa.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2007/09/quorn-mince.jpg)

It's based off of some fungus that they grow in giant vats and then mince up. It's ridiculously delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 17 Jan 2011, 11:37
They sell quorn here too, but I prefer the TVP kind. I can taste the fungus amongus when I try to eat quorn:/
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Gemmwah on 17 Jan 2011, 11:38
I had that problem, my mum tried to tell me "oh god it doesn't taste of anything!" but I really don't like the taste of quorn, I much prefer just having vegetables in the sauce than substituting with quorn.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Jan 2011, 11:40
Next time you look at a can of chef boyardee pasta in meat sauce, check the ingredients! The meat chunks are actually textured soy protein (ever wonder why it doesn't feel like meat?).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 17 Jan 2011, 11:52
That's the thing though James, tvp tastes good/like nothing, but the quorn tastes...quorn-y. Similar textures, but distinct flavor difference. I know loads of vegetarians who swear by it though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: StaedlerMars on 17 Jan 2011, 11:53
I'll have a look out for TVP, but I think quorn is the only mince that they sell in our tesco, could probably venture further afield though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 17 Jan 2011, 12:09
You can actually get dried TVP and then make a batch of it with whatever broth or spices you want, but that may be a hippie-food store sort of item.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 17 Jan 2011, 14:48
When I last used TVP, it was pretty much like crumbling a soft rubber (eraser  to you!) into my food - i.e. it ruined the entire dish.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 17 Jan 2011, 15:45
If you get the dried stuff, also get, like, some dried mushrooms or tomatoes or something and use the juice leftover from re-hydrating the mushrooms for re-hydrating the TVP. Alternatively, re-hydrate it in a soy/miso preparation for a more meaty flavour.
Dried TVP has been available at every Bulk Barn I've been to.

TVP is not a miracle food that will let you make burgers or anything, it is basically a mostly bland little bit of protein that feels like a cross between meat and an eraser (rubber to some of you).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: TheInfamousMeg on 17 Jan 2011, 20:52
Does anyone have any good Indian food recipes? I make a mean curry, but I want to learn more. Any ideas?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 17 Jan 2011, 22:44
Quorn really is a pitiful excuse for food. I appreciate that vegetarians may sometimes want to substitute meat in a dish to achieve a similar effect, but you can do so much better than this. If nothing else, at least tofu carries flavours well and is far nicer to eat.

TheInfamousMeg - The Hairy Bikers have some Indian good recipies in some of their books and some of them will be online on the BBC website.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 17 Jan 2011, 23:00
For Indian cooking I'd highly recommend buying the book 1000 Indian Recipes (http://www.amazon.com/000-Indian-Recipes-Neelam-Batra/dp/0764519727/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1295333918&sr=1-1). Provides exactly what it says on the cover. I've cooked a heap of recipes from it and they've all been fantastic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: TheInfamousMeg on 17 Jan 2011, 23:09
Thank you both!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 18 Jan 2011, 00:36
So I posted this in the photo thread but didn't realize it's a little more in line with this one!

Some roommates and I arranged a dinner date for which each of us with our respective dates cooked one course for a gigantic meal. The theme was middle eastern food and my date and I made some baklava for desert!
(http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/4284/1001039k.jpg)
The point of it all was to make something we've never tried before. We snagged recipes off allrecipes.com, made shopping trips together and went for it. Below you can see the other dishes, including Persian chicken, Lebanese-style hummus and potatoes.
(http://img833.imageshack.us/img833/4412/1001041p.jpg)
Everything was pretty incredible if you ask me.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 18 Jan 2011, 01:10
Nobody made fattoush? Bad Decision.


I have decided (once again) to try and start cooking at home more, so that ben and I don't waste so much money eating out all the time. Tonight we made mexican chicken wrap things (chicken, tortillas, "burrito seasoning", salsa and salad stuff) which were pretty tasty, and simple to make. We worked out we have all the ingredients to make the 'burrito seasoning' that we used to coat the chicken, but it was a slight convenience-based decision I made when buying the stuff. Plus there is heaps of chicken left over for me to have for lunch tomorrow, so I actually will eat more than a honey sandwich and a bowl of coco pops tomorrow! Now I just have to try and find some quick and easy recipes so that we don't go get takeaway at the first sign of not wanting to cook.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 18 Jan 2011, 04:13
This is definitely cheating because I will not be cooking, but I am going to a supper club! And we will be eating:

* Grape Leaves Stuffed with Lemon Zest Confit, Poppy Seed, Sumac, Feta and Black Olive Risotto

* 100% Homemade Tortilla Chips tossed with Smoked Paprika & Fleur du Sel and accompanied with Fresh Guacamole and Chipotle Pepper Pico de Gallo

* Roasted Garlic & Belgian Ale Hummus and Alexa's Tabouleh served 'Taco Style' in Mediterranean Flatbread

* Cheddar & Cream Cheese Stuffed Jalapeño Poppers

* Korean Kimchee & Tofu Croquettes with a Harissa, Chive & Sweet Shoyu Mayonnaise

* Dark, Milk & White Chocolate assortment with Fresh Fruit

My mouth is watering already.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 18 Jan 2011, 09:21
Nobody made fattoush? Bad Decision.

I've never heard of the stuff before, but it looks delicious. That said, I don't know that any one of us could have picked a proper assortment of ingredients and applied the right amount of seasoning to do it justice.

Also this thread is incredible, why haven't I read it before!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 19 Jan 2011, 14:12
after a convo with sam, i decided to do things up right and i did that quinoa dish i posted earlier but i put a fried egg on top. bada bing – breaking the yolk gave about seven or eight bites an added richness. popping an egg on something is an easy way to basically sauce it up. i highly recommend it.

also, tip for that quinoa thing i posted? when you're sauteeing the mushrooms, throw in a splash of sesame oil – it adds exactly the right flavour to the dish.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 19 Jan 2011, 17:57
I'm really proud of myself, I have cooked actual dinners three nights in a row! Nothing too exciting, but it's been a while since I made much besides rice or noodles (aside from some baking). This week I made:

Monday: sauteed pierogis, with tomato sauce on mine
Tuesday: curry rice with chickpeas and tomatoes
Wednesday: basmati rice, pierogis with tomato sauce and sauteed onions (for me), and baked chicken breast with sliced potatoes and onions (for the boy)

Do you guys have some advice on cooking chicken? It is not something I know how to do, what with the vegetarian parents and all. Raw, it's all gooey and skeeves me right the fuck out, and when cooking I've no idea how to heat it sufficiently without it drying out and becoming a rock. As in, oven temp + cooking time = clueless Rosie. I don't need nothin' fancy, he won't eat scary things like green vegetables or mushrooms, but so far all I've really mastered is chicken taco kits, so any tips would be appreciated.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 19 Jan 2011, 18:08
I cook chicken breasts in a frypan with the lid on. Do it at a half-heat so it cooks slowly. You can stick a knife in to check for pinkness if you're not sure it's done. A tiny amount of pinkish fluid is okay as long as the meat is all white.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 19 Jan 2011, 18:53
Funny you mention it, I'm about to cook me up some chicken right now. I tend to do it on the stovetop too, since I don't have access to a grill up here. I'm actually gonna try and recreate something I came up with a while ago, cooking it with a little bit of cola and some habanero peppers. The soda gives it a nice sweetness to balance the heat of the peppers.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 19 Jan 2011, 19:32
Frying pan on medium to low heat is pretty much the way I go without grilling or doing some recipe-based baking/marinating. Do you use oil? That's probably a silly question, but if not, coating the chicken itself in some and/or using some in the pan could help prevent you from drying it out. Too much, of course, could easily burn it, so be extra careful with the heat.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 20 Jan 2011, 18:03
Made an almost-Caprese salad tonight - had no bococcini so I used brie, and I reduced some balsamic vinegar to drizzle over it. So delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 20 Jan 2011, 19:10
Chevre is my favorite for insalata caprese.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 20 Jan 2011, 22:39
If you don't like handling raw meat, get a chicken brick (basically a terracotta roasting dish) and roast the whole chicken. Failing that, put it in a normal roasting tin and cover with foil. Times are, and always will be 20 minutes for each 500g + 20 minutes. If like me you're a compulsive chicken stuffer, don't forget to add time for the weight of the stuffing and another 10 minutes if it's really dense. The Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall method is well advised. Crank the oven up to 190oC for the first third of the time/30 minutes, which ever is shorter and then knock it down to around 140oC for the remaining time.

The resulting chicken will be nice and moist and tasty. The bonus being is that this is a cheaper method of buying chicken and when you strip all the meat off the carcass you'll have plenty for lots of different meals. Roast chicken fries pretty well in preparation for things like curries, soups or anything else really.

Either that or suck it up and start handling the raw meat. If you're over in the US or Canada then you might want to start buying whole chickens anyway. From my experience, that side of the Atlantic has a tendancy to inject beef stock into chicken breasts in order to get them to weigh more and therefore make more money. The consequence of this is that the meat feels more slimy and gooey, which is not the natural state of chicken meat. With a whole chicken a bit of practice will mean that you can have one jointed in about 10 minutes. You end up with better meat, with greater range and it's still on the bone, which can benefit a lot of recipies.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 21 Jan 2011, 12:15
Urg, that assumes that you're down with handling COOKED meat as an alternative though. Not sure about Rosiepants, but I grew up in that same household and oh man no way am I yanking apart a chicken *ahem* stripping all the meat off the carcass.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 21 Jan 2011, 12:37
Boneless skinless chicken breast is basically the way to go if you're afraid of meat. It's a little sticky but it isn't bloody-red and unless you cut it you don't see the muscle grain or anything. You're just going to have to wade into the chicken breasts if you want to be able to handle meat.

Frying with a lid on is a good way to keep moisture in. Usually I just fry' em till they're nice and brown on the outside, flipping once, without a lid. Just don't be afraid, like lunchy said, to stick a knife in there. As long as the meat isn't pink inside you're good.

Poaching is pretty safe if you want but I'm not as fond of it. Basically toss them in water/stock/wine and boil for a while. I do not know the times because I never do it but it is lower-stress and much harder to dry out. I like to throw a thin level of beer/stock/broth/wine/whatever's on hand in the bottom of a fry-pan sometimes to give some flavour and moisture.

I'd recommend grabbing just one of those basic cookbooks that give you basic reliable recipes for most things (or How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman if you want more stuff because it is a solid book). Also this guy's blog (http://www.howtocookmeat.com/) is call How To Cook Meat and it is a stand-up resource for meat. I like it a lot. His broiled, brined pork-chops are one of my regulars now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 21 Jan 2011, 12:55
Yeah I am not so interested in having an entire dead bird in my house. Especially because the one meat-eater in the house is terrible about leftovers.
 I usually get the boneless skinless breasts but still it's all jiggly and squishy and ew. I'll have to try the frying pan + lid method some time, sounds like people kind of prefer it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 21 Jan 2011, 14:39
Pretty much the only meat I ever cook these days is frozen boneless, skinless chicken breast tenders.  I have the same growing-up-vegetarian-and-being-kind-of-weirded-out-by-meat thing.

I grab a couple out of the bag, throw 'em in a hot pan with a little bit of oil, wash my hands immediately.  When they've browned on both sides, I add a 1/2 cup (ish) of wine, beer, or teriyaki sauce/water--if I'm not feeling lazy, I might make a real sauce, but some liquid helps keep the chicken moist and adds flavor.  I continue to add liquid as needed if it starts to look dry.  I cook them like that until I can't see any pink, then add some chopped veggies in the last couple of minutes (usually broccoli, green beans, spinach, chayotes, or some combination).

This (1) limits my handling of the chicken to >10 seconds, and (2) tastes pretty good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 21 Jan 2011, 14:48
How did you guys take the step from being vegetarian and then eating meat? I simply can't imagine a situation where I'd think "yeah, I'll try that!" after twenty years of just automatically not eating meat or fish.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 21 Jan 2011, 14:59
I decided I would eat meat when I was an au pair in Italy--I figured that I was there for the cultural experience and part of that was eating what the family ate.  They didn't eat that much meat anyway, so it wasn't a big deal.

Then when I got back, I never really went back to being vegetarian.  I considered going back last year (some of you probably remember my Vegetarianism Crisis), but I ultimately decided that it was easier just to eat less meat and only serve it on occasion.  I probably eat some meat maybe 2-4 meals a week now.  Not much.  If I'm eating alone, I pretty much never cook it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 21 Jan 2011, 22:20
I'm guessing that there are a fair few people here who wouldn't favour my draconian policy on having to kill and prepare one thing, at least once, in order to be allowed to eat meat. Be warned, when I am supreme ruler of the world for life, no one gets off lightly.

To be fair though, the frying pan and lid method is pretty good and when I'm just doing chicken breasts without doing anything special to them then this is what I do. Worth noting that if you cook them with the skin still on, chicken breasts will automatically stay more moist and taste more chickeny (unless your supplier has done the upthread and injected them with beef stock, in which case just more salty. This is mostly only done to intensively farmed broiler chickens), I would have thought that the feel of skin wouldn't be as bad as the feel of the meat.

If your going to go down the route of frying pan and lid for chicken, consider the thighs as well. If available, they're also usually sold skinless and boneless and being darker meat means that they have a deeper flavour that stands up well to being cooked with other bolder ingredients. My stock recipie for these is to fry them plain and put them in a heated ciabatta with pesto and some salad for a tasty sandwich.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: McTaggart on 22 Jan 2011, 01:09
Chicken is by far the most disgusting of the common raw meats.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 22 Jan 2011, 12:40
Easiest way to cook up chicken, like other people have said, is to cook it in a pan in some oil (just enough to cover the bottom). I've never done it with a lid, because I've never had a problem with the chicken being dry. An easy recipe for chicken that I like is take some olive oil, some italian herb mix, and garlic (I usually use powder or salt, but fresh works too), coat the chicken in the mix, and then cook it on the stove in the oil over medium-low/medium heat. (Also Italian dressing + more herbs works very well, too.)

And if you don't like touching chicken, just use a fork or tongs or something. I usually make the oil mix first and then open the pack of chicken and use a fork to handle the meat so I don't have to wash my hands every 5 seconds. (I'm OCD about washing my hands after I've touched raw meat.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 22 Jan 2011, 14:37
also: if you're having difficulty like physically working with the breast, make the switch to real poultry parts. i still find breasts kind of gross but doing up a thigh or a wing or a leg or whatever is actually somewhat less disgusting because it isn't just an anonymous lump of muscle. it's weird to think that seeing something with a bone in it might actually be less discomforting but really handling a meat teardrop is basically garden-variety nasty
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 22 Jan 2011, 15:00
(here is another food blog I like, it has good recipes and is helpful as well (http://foodwishes.blogspot.com/search/label/Chicken))
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 22 Jan 2011, 15:46
if you're having difficulty like physically working with the breast
nnnnnngh
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 22 Jan 2011, 18:36
i hear you, brother
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Verergoca on 23 Jan 2011, 09:52
Whoo! A while ago I decided that baking bread would be a good thing to learn. After continiously forgetting that i had flour and all the doodads for a few weeks, i finally got round to it!

Behold!

(http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d79/Verergoca/DSCN7722.jpg)

(I think i should have used 2 packages of yeast, but hey, i call it a learning experience!)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 23 Jan 2011, 15:56
I say this purely out of curiosity, but what kind of countertop is that? Snakeskin?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ackblom12 on 23 Jan 2011, 15:59
Textured stainless steel I'm guessing?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: sean on 24 Jan 2011, 00:43
Whoo! A while ago I decided that baking bread would be a good thing to learn.

(http://m.assetbar.com/uua7fL3b8.gif)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: sean on 24 Jan 2011, 00:44
the lesson here being if you can make a bitchin pasta you are still raw
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 24 Jan 2011, 01:11
I really need to learn to make pasta. Might have to add it to the new years resolutions list.

In the mean time I did some baked coley last night, which was lovely. Topped it with a quick onion and fennel sauce, made by the simple method of slicing said onion and fennel, sweating it, adding garlic, tarragon, parsley and some vegetable stock. All served atop roasted squash and potato.

Incidentally, whilst handling the fish last night it did occur to me that those that aren't down with handling meat might get on well with white fish as the raw texture is a lot less meaty then meat. Of course you would have to like fish.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 24 Jan 2011, 21:00
Nobody made fattoush? Bad Decision.

I've never heard of the stuff before, but it looks delicious. That said, I don't know that any one of us could have picked a proper assortment of ingredients and applied the right amount of seasoning to do it justice.

Also this thread is incredible, why haven't I read it before!
It is beyond the thunderdome amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 25 Jan 2011, 10:36
the ability to bake bread is one of the things i miss most about having an apartment with a real kitchen. well, the ability to bake anything really. all i have down here is a hot plate and a toaster oven. it is difficult to be alive.

as soon as i get out of here and into a real apartment, though: BREAD PARTY
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 28 Jan 2011, 14:53
(http://img593.imageshack.us/img593/5615/img1159t.jpg)

chicken, buttermilk biscuits, green beans and gravy.  So good.  Tomorrow Steve is going to use the leftover chicken to make chili. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 28 Jan 2011, 14:56
BREAD PARTY

Some of my friends do this! It's a "man" thing, though, so I have not gone, but I would like to learn how to make bread eventually.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 28 Jan 2011, 14:58
BREAD PARTY

Some of my friends do this! It's a "man" thing, though
You, go crash that shit at the first opportunity.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 28 Jan 2011, 15:30
Linds what are you talking about, I have seen you as a man and you're far more convincing than many men with the testicles to prove it. Just go in drag!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 28 Jan 2011, 16:23
(http://img593.imageshack.us/img593/5615/img1159t.jpg)

chicken, buttermilk biscuits, green beans and gravy.  So good.  Tomorrow Steve is going to use the leftover chicken to make chili. 

I have no food to speak of at the moment house and seeing this picture is not doing good things to me
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ikrik on 28 Jan 2011, 21:27
I have perfected Pizza, Pad Thai, Quesadillas, and a relative amount of breakfast food.  What's interesting though is how impressed people are by the fact that I can make garlic bread.  Seriously, I've told people that I had garlic bread the other day and the reaction I get is almost always "you bought it from Safeway? That stuff is so expensive." and the reply is "No, I make it myself." And it's followed up by "How!?"  Seriously.  It amazes me.  The ingredient list is one word longer than the name of the dish(?)

I'm going to make Eggs Benedict later next week, probably on the weekend.  If it turns out well I will post delicious, delicious food porn.  

Living alone forces you to learn very quickly how much/little you eat.  It can be irritating to cook a recipe and realize that you only really wanted to make half of it because now you have a bunch of leftovers that you don't really want anymore.  Took two months to figure that out.

-edited because I am both awesome at making an excellent noodle-based dish as well as paying for delicious food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 28 Jan 2011, 21:59
I have perfected . . . Paid Thai

I too have perfected the art of paying for Thai food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 29 Jan 2011, 06:26
After last night I would just like to strongly recommend shoulder of lamb marinated in red wine for four days (slight planning fail) with herbs and garlic. Very pleasing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 29 Jan 2011, 09:56
that's WAY too long to marinate but like if you were to braise it for several hours in red wine that would probably be phenomenal
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 29 Jan 2011, 10:14
I assure you that it was in no way too long and was absolutely delicious.

In the meantime, I've bought a whole squid on impulse and now have to learn how to prepare one of these things.

God bless the internet.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 29 Jan 2011, 17:35
With no inspiration from the top of the page tonight is gonna be a night for biscuits and country gravy and mashed potatoes and collards with bacon and buttermilk fried chicken.

Swag.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 29 Jan 2011, 21:05
White gravy still creeps me out.

What should I make for dinner, it is really really hot today and I am hungry but I don't want to turn the stove on.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Professor Snuggles on 30 Jan 2011, 01:22
What gravy is the best gravy you are mad
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 30 Jan 2011, 11:56
Hockey Night in Canada, Poutine Night in my Tummy
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Cernunnos on 30 Jan 2011, 12:13
guys why did nobody tell me flatbread was so easy to make and so delicious

what the hell

geez
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 06 Feb 2011, 13:42
BREAD COOK CHOP SWAG

(http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/hs043.snc6/167357_511991768452_122100375_30480770_572157_n.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 06 Feb 2011, 13:43
that was ready about 40 minutes ago and now there's maybe 1/5 of it left
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 06 Feb 2011, 15:06
Good fresh bread is the best thing!
Do you remember all the times you used (how long it rose, how many times)? Extra fermentation is The Best.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 06 Feb 2011, 15:11
What gravy is the best gravy you are mad

We have had several long discussions in the past on the merits of white country gravy, some people did not know it was a thing or denied that it was superior in all ways to the browner varieties, apparently some of them are still in denial.

Its okay though, we know.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 06 Feb 2011, 15:13
I am still waiting on making the beautiful thing that will unify our people and bring peace to our world!
There will be so much gravy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 06 Feb 2011, 15:36
White gravy does not exist in Australia. I would be willing to try some but for now I am happy to think it looks awful because it looks like the congealed fat on the bottom of the grill after you've cooked sausages and that just grosses me out.

Also I hate every other white sauce ever.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 06 Feb 2011, 19:51
This gravy debate cannot happen again for the sake of peace and happiness in the King household. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 06 Feb 2011, 21:09
Good fresh bread is the best thing!
Do you remember all the times you used (how long it rose, how many times)? Extra fermentation is The Best.

yes!

it waited 17-ish hours in a towel-covered bowl on my counter, then 15 minutes under some loose plastic wrap while i prepped another towel for it to sit on, then it sat on one towel and under another for two hours. it spent half an hour in a pre-heated covered dutch oven in a 450˚F oven, then another half hour in that oven with no lid on the dutch oven. then it sat on the rack. then 3/4 of it was gone within 40 minutes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 06 Feb 2011, 21:39
In Australia we have a cook named Stephanie Alexander (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephanie_Alexander). She's pretty much universally loved and respected, she's done a huge amount to educate Australians about food, her incredible book the Cook's Companion is basically a kitchen bible in Australia and has been an essential item in any Australian household pretty much from the moment its first edition was published in 1996 - you get the picture, she's a classy lady and she really knows her stuff.

Anyway in the Cook's Companion, at the beginning of the chapter on bread, she says:

Quote
once the bread is cooked, never succumb to temptation and cut into it while still hot. You will compress the crumb of the bread, and hot bread is indigestible!

to which I reply: Stephanie Alexander, you are a classy lady and you really know your stuff but shut the hell up and let me enjoy the most delicious thing ever created in the history of human civilisation.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 07 Feb 2011, 02:10
I'm having a bit of a kick on old fashioned puddings at the moment so when my girlfriends parents announced that they were coming to visit (a fairly momentous and rare occasion in itself) I settled on jam roly poly to follow a Sunday roast. I proudly presented it fresh from the oven to the table and then nipped back to the kitchen to get the custard and the camera. Alas by the time I had returned to the dining room, the greedy vultures had mercilessly mangled it in an attempted to free it from the paper.

However, a reasonable attempt for the first time of cooking and a very nostalgic and tasty trip down memory lane. There will be more jam roly poly in the future. Oh yes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 07 Feb 2011, 06:32
Other than in stewed/briased/cooked in beer, does anyone have any reccomendations for ox tail. I'm tempted by ox tail with chorizo and rioja but wandered if anyone had anything else to suggest.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 07 Feb 2011, 06:50
You, go crash that shit at the first opportunity.

Linds what are you talking about, I have seen you as a man and you're far more convincing than many men with the testicles to prove it. Just go in drag!

As in male bonding time and I don't crash male bonding time. Most of my guy friends either are married, live with girlfriends, or just generally spend a lot of time around ladies. They need their manly baking time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 07 Feb 2011, 21:44
So living in a crummy cramped student apartment I have been living off microwaved goods for a while now. I am however working on my stovetop-hamburger technique. I've found a lid does wonders for them, though I need to keep the temperatures a bit lower since they've been too dark for my liking. For toppings, I tend to go onions-ketchup-brown mustard-relish-pepperjack cheese-Tabasco on the bun. I've considered getting some tomato, but I wouldn't use it for anything else and I already have ketchup. And I'm just not a big lettuce fan. Give me good crispy onions over lettuce any day. I do lament not having actual pickles to slice up, that may go on the shopping list.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 07 Feb 2011, 23:04
Liz – use a lid for sure. And tips on crusts, searin', and flippin' from the usual source (http://aht.seriouseats.com/archives/2010/02/the-burger-lab-how-many-times-should-you-flip-a-burger-while-cooking.html).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 08 Feb 2011, 08:57
What am I putting a lid on?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 08 Feb 2011, 09:35
Your head. You know, like a hat.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 08 Feb 2011, 09:39
Thursday I am making white chicken chili and I am so excited. I made it a few months ago and liked it immensely, but I think this time I'm gonna use more chicken and whatnot to balance out the beans more. (I thought there were too many beans, but that may be because I don't like eating a lot of beans.)

Does anyone have any chicken tortilla/enchilada soup recipes that are really good?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 08 Feb 2011, 13:33
I have been really into Mexican food lately, echoing Linds' request.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 08 Feb 2011, 13:49
Special Occassion Cake Project!
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/JamesCakeOne008.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/JamesCakeOne006.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/JamesCakeOne007.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 08 Feb 2011, 14:01
What kind of cake is that? I really really hope it is triple-layered chocolate with white layering like the decoration suggests! And is the tiny cake also cake, or icing all through?

It looks great, hope it goes down as well!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 08 Feb 2011, 16:47
it was a 7.5 out of 10 which I was quite happy with. Honestly I think it could be worth more, but they were marking super-hard and super-critically and there are specific things for working with fondant that they marked on that we didn't really know that well. I got lots of constructive feedback on things that would bring each element up over the top.
The fake cake on top is actually hollow, just fondant. The cake on the inside is just styrofoam because that is what we use to practice on.

(also the chocolates are legit dipped in chocolate, they were so tiny but it wasn't as hard as I thought)

like, the border danishes should have been maybe 2/3rds to 1/2 the size they were, and both them and the bitty-baguettes could have been painted with an alcohol/food colouring mix to make them looked baked out, my royal icing for flooding was too thin (so the white inside collapsed instead of staying tall and round), the tiny cake shouldn't have been centered (look at picture 2 there, it obscures all those pretty breads), the rope was note perfectly uniform in size and it wasn't spiraled perfectly regularly, and that gives us five things wrong which I guess docked my five half-marks.

It was all good experience!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 08 Feb 2011, 22:10
What am I putting a lid on?

holy shit! i confused your av with sirjuggles'. put a lid on everything you make liz
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Spluff on 08 Feb 2011, 23:48
if you liked it you shoulda put a lid on it
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 09 Feb 2011, 07:39
I am planning on baking a pie today. Should I put a lid on it?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 09 Feb 2011, 10:54
If by lid you mean top crust, probably but not necessarily, depends on the pie.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 09 Feb 2011, 11:39
If you liked it, then you should have put a lid on it. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 09 Feb 2011, 11:58
Retrospective baking advice is no advice at all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 09 Feb 2011, 12:24
Don’t be mad once you see that he want it
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 09 Feb 2011, 14:25
Oh Kat I love you. Really I do.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 09 Feb 2011, 16:06
Bahaha, Kat, you rock. Also, James, is that cake on the cake a lie?



Also also: I still want a chicken tortilla/enchilada soup recipe!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 10 Feb 2011, 19:28
So I made my chili (it was delicious) and I also made guacamole (it was fantastic). I have become to love garlic in my guacamole so much I think it tastes weird without it. Any of you guys have any special ingredients you like to put in guac?

A basic rundown of my recipe is: avacado, onion (preferably red, but white is ok too), lime juice, cilantro, tomato (salsa if I don't have any), and garlic. I just chuck things in until it tastes right and as long as I don't overdo the onion or lime juice, it's just fine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 10 Feb 2011, 19:44
I just made guac for lunch! It was delicious.
My guac recipe is pretty much the same as your except cilantro is expensive and we don't have a herb garden. And I don't put garlic in because I think the taste is magnificent without it. Oh, also, lots of freshly ground black pepper.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SonofZ3 on 15 Feb 2011, 13:26
Holy shit, make this mousse- (you NEED a hand held electric mixer, or a counter top mixer)

5 egg yolks (just the yolks!)
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup powdered sugar
1 cup milk chocolate morsels
1 cup heavy cream (you use each of the cups of cream in different stages, so I listed them as two ingredients)

Seperate 5 egg yolks into a bowl. Beat on high setting approx 3 minutes until thick. Slowly add 1/4 cup powdered sugar while beating.

Heat 1 cup of heavy whipping cream in saucepan over medium-low heat. Do not boil. When hot, add 1/2 heated cream to egg and sugar mixture, stirring or beating until combined.

Pour egg/sugar/cream into the saucepan with the cream on the stove. Stir until combined.

Slowly add 1 cup of morsels. They will not combine completely in the pan. Stir until morself are completely melted, then transfer back into your original bowl. use electric mixer to beat thoroughly, until completely combined. Refrigerate for 2 hours.

Beat second cup of cream on high speed until thick and fluffy, slowly beat in refrigerated mixture until fluffy. Separate into small bowls and refrigerate until serving.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Feb 2011, 13:45
Rather than beating the one mixture into the other, try gently folding it in with a whisk or spatula. Will give you more volume and lightness. As well, you could try keeping those egg-whites and whipping them up to medium-stiff and folding them in too when you're folding together the whipped cream/chocolate (a little bit at a time). The whites will be uncooked but that's fine and I think you'll appreciate the effect.
Might need to add some gelatine but I think you'd be fine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 15 Feb 2011, 16:25
better bread picture

(http://img705.imageshack.us/img705/8620/img04521024x682.jpg)

bread

e: edited for actual bread picture. sorry y'all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 15 Feb 2011, 16:50
Are you complaining about breaders again?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 15 Feb 2011, 16:51
fucking breaders
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 15 Feb 2011, 17:16
Hey Johnny

maybe

in ten years time

if neither of us has found someone to bread with

maybe

maybe we should bread with each-other
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 15 Feb 2011, 17:25
I feel a little whorish because if that had fewer line breaks it would be my sig-quote.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Alex C on 15 Feb 2011, 18:36
I have some extra cash (in my mind it is Steak Money, proper noun status) but I can't decide between a couple of ribeyes or a couple of t-bones or a mix of both or even if I should just use the extra money to try making something else that'd be awesome.

Help me with my first world problems.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 15 Feb 2011, 21:49
roast a tri-tip
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 15 Feb 2011, 22:34
I have some extra cash (in my mind it is Steak Money, proper noun status) but I can't decide between a couple of ribeyes or a couple of t-bones or a mix of both or even if I should just use the extra money to try making something else that'd be awesome.

T-Bones ain't shit, rib-eye is the King of Steaks
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 16 Feb 2011, 00:45
Just made meatballs for dinner, basing them off lunchy's recipe, but a little different. We added chopped up bacon but forgot the italian herbs. Then used a bottle of pasta sauce because I was too lazy to get stuff to make the sauce. The meatballs are maybe a little bit bigger than I wanted them to be, but oh god they are delicious. That makes two nights of cooking dinner in a row, because we had steak an salad last night. Cooking is tops.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 16 Feb 2011, 03:59
Yay!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Thomas Edison on 16 Feb 2011, 18:32
I also used Lunchy's meatball recipe! But I substituted the beef for lamb and the beef stock for a fork of mint sauce. And then I used them in a meatball, caramelised onion, mushroom and sweet potato pizza.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 16 Feb 2011, 19:16
This is not a bad result for something that I made up off the top of my head. Maybe I should start working some variations. Put 'em in a book. Call it 'LUNCHBALLS' or something equally delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ummmkay on 16 Feb 2011, 19:31
call it "lunchables"

duh
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 16 Feb 2011, 19:41
I also have some made-up recipes for Thai Chicken balls and Baked Italian Chicken Meatballs.
Chicken Mince: Not Entirely Useless.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 16 Feb 2011, 20:48
Here is the chili Steve made with that leftover chicken from last page.  I forgot to post it before. 
(http://img577.imageshack.us/img577/7700/img1161z.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 16 Feb 2011, 21:40
oh man chicken chili is the best chili
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 16 Feb 2011, 22:08
I also used Lunchy's meatball recipe! But I substituted the beef for lamb and the beef stock for a fork of mint sauce. And then I used them in a meatball, caramelised onion, mushroom and sweet potato pizza.

shiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit

did you mandoline the sweet potatoes? that's how i'm picturing it. god damn
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Thomas Edison on 18 Feb 2011, 14:29
We don't have a mandoline in halls. I did my best to cut them into lengthways thin strips though, so it made a second base between the dough/sauce and the rest of the pizza.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 18 Feb 2011, 14:48
YES perfect
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 19 Feb 2011, 16:20
SALAD YOU CAN MAKE FRIENDS WITH



Although this does involve a bit of work at the stove, it is so absolutely divine when scoffed with a beer on a hot hot Saturday night, and it's really filling.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5092/5459988268_0df8c1d7ec.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/slackadaisy/5459988268/)


You will need:
Pumpkin (I used half a butternut, about 800g before preparing), cut into batons of about 1.5cm
Haloumi cheese (250g packet), sliced into bits about 4mm thick
Green beans (a good handful), topped and tailed and cut in half
Chickpeas (a small can), rinsed and drained well
Rocket (aragula) or baby spinach leaves, however much you want
Honey
Olive oil
Balsamic vinegar
One lemon

How to make it:
Start with preparing your pumpkin. Place the pieces onto a lined or greased baking tray and roast. I cooked mine at 240C for about twenty minutes.
While the pumpkin is cooking, grill your haloumi. I did it in a frypan with a splash of olive oil, but if you have a grill that's probably better. Make sure they're golden on both sides. Set aside on paper towels.
Cook your beans. I did mine in the microwave in a pyrex jug, with a bit of water and then covered with cling wrap. Nuke on high for two minutes, then take them out and immediately rinse them in cold water. This stops them cooking and makes them nice and crunchy.
After rinsing your chick peas well, try and remove any skins that are floating around. Put in a bowl and squeeze half a lemon over them.
Rinse your salad greens and pat dry.
When your pumpkin is almost done, pull the tray out and drizzle the pumpkin with a little bit of honey. Put back in the oven for another 5 minutes whilst you prepare the dressing.
In a coffee mug, mix the juice of the other half of the lemon, one tablespoon of olive oil and two tablespoons of balsamic vinegar.
Get the pumpkin out and set aside to cool for a minute.
Mix the rocket, chickpeas and beans well with the dressing. Add the pumpkin and haloumi and mix gently.
Serve in big bowls and eat it in your underwear whilst making "Mmm" noises.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 19 Feb 2011, 16:56
Haloumi is so good, so delicious.

I'm making steak with onion marmalade tonight. And tater tots. Tater tots!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 19 Feb 2011, 18:40
i made carnitas

(https://s-hphotos-snc6.fbcdn.net/183288_512128898642_122100375_30482891_1460115_n.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 19 Feb 2011, 19:10
I am making braised lamb with white wine, cremini mushrooms and tomatoes. Simple recipe, but a lot of work.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 19 Feb 2011, 20:34
i made carnitas

(https://s-hphotos-snc6.fbcdn.net/183288_512128898642_122100375_30482891_1460115_n.jpg)

those are kicking the ass of the tuna fish sandwiches in my stomach and making me feel like roast beef
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 19 Feb 2011, 21:04
The day when I realized tacos could be made with things besides ground beef was a brilliant day indeed. Also on that day I had corn-on-the-cob with mayo & chili powder on it (this is what the mexicans do, I swear!).

I have been thinking about plated desserts so much recently that I really want an arc of sour cream nestled in an curve of salsa on that plate for garnish.

I bought pizza-takeout tonight for supper on the assumption that when I came home at one o'clock after drinking with friends, that I'd find pizza in my fridge and be super-stoked about it. Instead I really really really want what you've got there, Mr. C. It Looks So Good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: KvP on 19 Feb 2011, 23:33
(http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/182835_10150150721579388_589819387_8230168_6997816_n.jpg)
Dredged in flour and pepper, braised w/ garlic and rosemary, then boiled in white wine and beef stock with some chopped tomatoes and crimini mushrooms, baked at 350 degrees for 2 hours and change.

Next time I'm going to have to add some peas and carrots. Get myself a stew goin.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 23 Feb 2011, 19:07
Check out my box! It is made of chocolate!
(http://img713.imageshack.us/img713/2491/18581910150099142868183.jpg)
Also there is a chocolate flower in there too!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: whom on 23 Feb 2011, 19:09
I WANT THAT
Yum...chocolate...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: JimmyJazz on 09 Mar 2011, 20:14
What do you call putting high-deas into practice?

(http://i876.photobucket.com/albums/ab325/desolationrow10/baconhotdogs.jpg)

winning
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: JimmyJazz on 09 Mar 2011, 20:24
Next time I'm going to have to add some peas and carrots. Get myself a stew goin.

(http://i876.photobucket.com/albums/ab325/desolationrow10/stewcarl.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 09 Mar 2011, 21:07
What do you call putting high-deas into practice?

obesity
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: JimmyJazz on 09 Mar 2011, 21:08
hey man why you gotta ruin me and my roommates' bacon-hot dog fun
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 09 Mar 2011, 21:27
It doesn't count unless you deep-fried them.

I'm making chicken fried steak this weekend.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 12 Mar 2011, 15:55
Oh My.  SO my Dad retired last year, and since has been having cooking adventures.  Last year he made his own corned beef.  It was the best corned beef ever.  This year he did it again, only he also bought a smoker and made pastrami.  I just ate a piece.  It was so good.  SO GOOD!
My mother told me he is looking to buy a pork belly and make his own bacon next.  Why am I moving away?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: calenlass on 18 Mar 2011, 03:16
Oh, hey, look at me, posting in this thread.

Hey, Johnny: if you make that tortelini-arugula-lemon stuff, I have a few recommendations to improve it beyond "make pasta, sauté greens, mix" (which is what it looked like).
1) Lemon juice in the pasta water, along with the olive oil and salt and pepper. Seriously, it gets into the filling. A+
2) I discovered that properly sautéing the rocket/arugula in the olive oil pulls out most of its flavor, so don't cook it long at all, I guess (as in, less than 2 minutes on low heat?). I am going to try just marinating it in olive oil and more lemon juice next time and see if not cooking it at all is nice. Also, I used baby arugula because it was all I could find, and that probably affected the flavour, but it is still pretty strong and peppery raw, so.
3) Put some romano on it and let it get kind of melty before you eat it. I used parmesan because it was all they had at the ghetto cheap grocery. It was ace.

Also beware, cooking the rocket smells bad unless you are right next to it. Like, collard greens-bad.

I hate cooking, why did I like this so much
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 24 Mar 2011, 14:34
Man I sure hope I have a UNSC mandate to back my actions in this thread because I'm about to commence with some PHOTOBOMBING!
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/DSCF5227.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/DSCF5217.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/DSCF5230.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/DSCF5224.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/DSCF5233.jpg)
(http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e66/jgcrawfo/DSCF5237.jpg)
OK, so, that last one, not quite so pretty as the rest of them. That one was slop-supper.

WE'VE GOT:
-German lebkuchen (think gingerbread cookies, but better) dipped in & garnished with chocolate
-Chocolate French macaroons filled with white chocolate-orange ganache
-More lebkuchen, formed into pretzel knots and drizzled with chocolate
-Piped chocolate filigrees
-'Collapsed Souffle' cake stuffed with kirsch & gran marnier ganache, coated in ground almonds and cocoa, and plated with chocolate sauce and blueberry coulis. Also topped with a bitchin' cool chocolate garnish.
-oh yeah, my supper. It is like, two fried eggs, topped with fried beef and onions, green salsa, and dubliner cheese. It was goddamn delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 24 Mar 2011, 14:49
MACARONS ARE THE BEST FOOD EVER PLEASE TELL ME MORE ABOUT HOW YOU MADE THESE.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 24 Mar 2011, 15:08
Why don't your macarons have feet, James? Hm? Hm Did you not let them sit long enough?

May there are lots of macaron recipes that the the rest of the cooking blogs swoon over here (http://www.tarteletteblog.com/2009/02/recipe-index.html).

Hey cooking thread!
I have made an amazing revelation. Don't peel your potatoes before cooking them for mash! Then when the potatoes are almost done, add corn kernels! Then prepare as usual. This tastes amazing and the texture is great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 24 Mar 2011, 16:07
Wait. I just read your post again. WHY HAVE I NEVER SEEN A MACAROON WITH FEET?


Macarons: serious business.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 24 Mar 2011, 17:31
The poofy bit on the bottom of a macroon is its feet. You're in France! You should see them everywhere!

Quote
Getting the pied, or feet, on macarons is one of the trickiest achievements in baking. The pied is the cute little ruffle on the bottom edge of the cookie. Without the pied, you couldn’t really call it a macaron. There are loads of things that can prevent you from getting those elusive little ruffles. Ogita says that rapping the baking sheet against the counter and drying the batter before baking are factors. Others say it’s the macaronnage (the mixing of the batter before piping) is what has the greatest impact on the feet. And still others point to humidity: the more humid the environment, the more difficult it is to make macarons in general. (Some of the best instructions I’ve found on macaron technique is on an excellent post on Food Nouveau.)

(http://debriefme.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/16-anatomy-of-a-macaron.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 24 Mar 2011, 18:17
When I first saw macaroons, I thought 'man how did they kind of mess up their meringues' and then later I realized that was intentional. I still think it looks a bit ugly but hey I should learn how to do it the way people like it!
I think I did not fold in enough of the nuts. I realized a conversion rate was inconsistent and that I consequently had too much dry mixture prepared, so I stopped folding in business when it looked like it'd hold up shape nicely.
Also my oven is wonky wonky at home and seems to be maybe 25ºC hotter than it should be these days. That's what I'm blaming the cracks on.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 24 Mar 2011, 18:24
James to be honest I am just as turned on by yr slop as I am by anything else in that post.

Hey cooking thread!
I have made an amazing revelation. Don't peel your potatoes before cooking them for mash! Then when the potatoes are almost done, add corn kernels! Then prepare as usual. This tastes amazing and the texture is great.

I left the skins on last time I made mashed potatoes (confession: mostly out of laziness) and it tasted awesome. Everybody else looked at me like I was crazy though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Caleb on 24 Mar 2011, 18:39
Yes I always do this.

Also I always boil my potatoes with garlic and onions.  Sometimes extra chunky Italian Dressing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 24 Mar 2011, 19:01
I left the skins on last time I made mashed potatoes (confession: mostly out of laziness) and it tasted awesome. Everybody else looked at me like I was crazy though.

what

There are people out there who take the time and energy to make their mashed potatoes have less nutrients and flavor?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 24 Mar 2011, 20:00
I also read in a cooking mag that people like their mashed potatoes extra smooth and go through the effort of pushing it through a mesh sieve to get lumps out. LUMPS ARE GOOD. WHAT IS THE MATTER WITH YOU.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ackblom12 on 24 Mar 2011, 20:01
I would typically agree but properly made riced mashed potatoes are sexual.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 24 Mar 2011, 20:12
when I make them I mash them with the skin.  One time Stephen cooked for me and he followed a recipe for mashed potatoes, from Job of Cooking I think.  He boiled onion in the water, and riced them, they were outrageously good.  But on your average night? leaving the skins on, mashing them with a masher. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 24 Mar 2011, 22:53
mashed potatoes are food for bitches. roast or die
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 26 Mar 2011, 15:54
Supper was roast turkey, balsamic caramelized parsnip w/bacon, roast veg, and rice. Chicken was rubbed beneath the skin with a mixture of butter, rosemary, oregano, and finely chopped dried peppers & tomatoes (home-dried). That layer was absolutely gorgeous by the skin but the flavours didn't carry into the meat at all.
Roast veg were OK but the chicken was tiny so they weren't in the oven as long as they really wanted which was a shame because the onions were close to, but not quite, awesome.
Parsnips were par-boiled, then cooked on high in a bit of bacon fat and butter for four minutes a side, then the bacon went in along with a tablespoon of white balsamic vinegar. This is one of my favorite new things, but really the bacon did not add anything (typically it is just butter) and I think I like the intensity of the dark balsamic better.
All around pretty good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 02 Apr 2011, 19:06
Was missing home, so I'm giving baking cookies a shot. Found a recipe online for chocolate cinnamon cookies, shall see how it turns out in... 2 minutes.

Cookies complete!

Before:
(http://i650.photobucket.com/albums/uu230/SirJuggles/Mobile%20Uploads/0402111859-00.jpg)

After:
(http://i650.photobucket.com/albums/uu230/SirJuggles/Mobile%20Uploads/0402111910-00.jpg)


They're pretty darn tasty, though the first batch I pulled a little early, and the second batch I left just a few second too long. So I have soft-falling-apart ones and crispy tan ones. Both of which I am ok with. I'm very happy with how nicely the cinnamon came through. Could perhaps use a few more chocolate chips next time....
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 03 Apr 2011, 11:32
Went out for a walk today in Cressbook Dale in The Peak District and came across a motherlode of wild garlic. Naturally I gathered up a big stash and bought it home.

First adventure in this was a lovely salsa. Once handful of wild garlic chopped fine, a handful of small pomodoro tomatoes thinly sliced, three sticks of celery finely chopped, some fresh basil, a squeeze of lemon juice, a pinch of dried coriander (didn't have any fresh, which I did), pinch of salt, hefty grind of pepper, a dash of balsamic vinegar, half a teaspoon of dijon mustard and some olive oil. Absolutely stunning and fresh and flavoursome. You can do anything you like for a good salsa but that was a good one.

Looks like the wild garlic has come out sooner than I thought and unfortunately it doesn't hang around for too long, it'll probably be gone by mid May. I can only strongly recommend you get out there as soon as possible and get picking, you won't be disappointed. If you're not that familiar with this, it's really easy to come by. Head out to a deciduous, mossy wood, not to thickly populated, and sniff around. The smelll is pretty pungent, garlicky and you won't mistake it for anything else. It grows in thick blankets next to and amongst other plants like bluebells that also grow in great swathes. It's thick, glossy green leaves grow in small clusters, sometimes with white flower heads. If in doubt, rip a leave and have a sniff, you'll know. It's one of the best wild flavours available and not to be missed.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 03 Apr 2011, 17:09
(http://pretentiousgamer.com/etc/macatacahodo.jpg)


I ate this for lunch today.

I wish this was the first time I could say a webcomic influenced what I put in my mouth, but it is not, nor will it be the last. In fact, now I want to have a webcomic themed potluck party.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 03 Apr 2011, 18:25
I mean the original comic was pretty funny when I read it, but that looks absolutely awful. Never let a child like that come up with a meal.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 03 Apr 2011, 18:29
 :-D :-D :-D :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :-D :-D :-D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 03 Apr 2011, 18:33
Okay I've been thinking about it for a bit, its not too much of a stretch to cut up hot dogs into mac and cheese, and I suppose the crunch could offset it nicely, but... never mind I don't even know
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 03 Apr 2011, 20:03
Yeah man. People combine hot dogs and mac'n'cheese all the time. And both the crunch and flavor of the taco shell actually contribute quite a lot to the thing. I am not dissatisfied with it. I might have another one for lunch tomorrow.

However, my wife made this for dinner.

(http://pretentiousgamer.com/etc/chdinner.jpg)

Because she thinks she's better than me is what it is. (That is a chicken breast stuffed with mozzarella, feta, and dried cranberries, then wrapped up all tasty style in puff pastry next to an artichoke that we made ina  crock pot so it got weird and brown, but it was still super delicious because it is a motherfucking artichoke, the king of food.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Apr 2011, 20:56
How does one eat a whole artichoke? Especially from a plate that small?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 03 Apr 2011, 21:57
I....I didn't know people didn't eat whole artichokes? I have never been in the middle of eating an artichoke and thought "man, I cannot eat any more artichoke. Toooo much." My thought process is more like "next I'm gonna eat that leaf and then that leaf and then that leaf and oh shit I'm so close to the end gonna eat some HEART YES."
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 03 Apr 2011, 22:00
But what happens when you get to the choke? What happens when you get a throat full of fluff and needle-sharp leaf tips?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 03 Apr 2011, 22:01
maybe I should try this art-choking thing
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 03 Apr 2011, 22:14
So do you like... peel the leaves off with your fingers and then put them in your mouth? It just looks impossible to try and cut with a knife and fork is what I was getting at.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 03 Apr 2011, 22:17
OH!

Okay

You eat an artichoke by pulling a leaf off, then you dip the end that was attached in some sort of fatty flavorful substance (like butter or mayonnaise or even don't it's still tasty) and just kind of scrape off that end with your teeth. As you get further down, that end gets more and more tender until you are basically just eating half the leaf and then at the bottom you can't eat anymore. But that's when it gets awesome because after you cut off the choke, which is a bunch of really awful pointy stringy things, but is pretty easy to remove, you're left with a whole fresh artichoke heart which is delicious as all fuck.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 04 Apr 2011, 07:55
then you scoop out the tiny stringy bundle in the center of it with a spoon though, don't forget that.

I use straight up balsamic vinegar with mine because it is amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 04 Apr 2011, 09:51
i'm as baffled as jordan. artichoke leaves are tasty and then you work your way down to a delicious and tender prize. it's like you are digging through a bunch of gold and then underneath the gold is a diamond. why would you just want the diamond when you can have the gold and also the diamond. doesn't make sense. doesn't parse.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 04 Apr 2011, 12:01
Mmmmmmm I love artichokes! My mum grows them in her garden, and I don't remember when the harvest is but I sure hope it falls between now and October or I've missed it...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 04 Apr 2011, 13:12
I am intrigued by the hot dog mac and cheese taco. But maybe in not a hard taco. Hmm. I really want to experiment with that. Maybe with garlic toast or a soft taco and my mac recipe.

Also I have never eaten an artichoke by itself. I've only had it chopped up in other dishes, like pasta and whatnot. Has anyone ever grilled one? It's getting warm. I want to grill pretty much every vegetable ever right now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 04 Apr 2011, 16:04
I will buy an artichoke next time I am cooking dinner for myself. I have eaten artichoke hearts in stuff but had no idea how they actually worked. Thanks dudes!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 04 Apr 2011, 19:55
I love, love, love artichokes, but they are on the list of foods that I only make on rare occasion because my boyfriend doesn't like them (he had the same, "What? How do you even eat that?" question at first) and because they take a long time to cook properly.  Artichoke in the crock pot is a really good idea.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 05 Apr 2011, 03:09
Tonight's dinner is kicken kievs with buttery garlicky cabbage and steamed broccolli and zucchini. The cabbage isn't as good as I would have liked, because I stupidly put in too much of the really hard part of the cabbage, but on the whole this dinner is amazing. And I'm not just saying that because I haven't eaten in eight hours.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nufan on 05 Apr 2011, 04:43
Man why are y'all talking about artichokes when that chicken/mozeralla/feta/cranberry thing is sitting right there, I mean those are literally like 4 of my favourite foodstuffs in one

FUCK artichokes
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ackblom12 on 05 Apr 2011, 05:46
FUCK artichokes

They certainly are fuckable.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 05 Apr 2011, 06:57
Ow.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 05 Apr 2011, 06:58
Melons are more fuckable.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ackblom12 on 05 Apr 2011, 07:06
We still need to make that T-Shirt some day.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 05 Apr 2011, 07:59
Man why are y'all talking about artichokes when that chicken/mozeralla/feta/cranberry thing is sitting right there, I mean those are literally like 4 of my favourite foodstuffs in one

because it's really nothing out of the ordinary to find these things crammed into one pastry?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 05 Apr 2011, 09:01
Used some more wild garlic in a cheese sauce last night. Now I'm thinking that I'd like to dip chargrilled artichokes into a wild garlic and cheese sauce. That would be excellent.

When I first heard people outside my family talking about eating artichokes I got really confused because they were talking about eating the leaves. Before then the only ones I'd had were Jerusalem artichokes, which aren't even closely related. Mind they're pretty tasty as well and I've been known to cook the two together. Works pretty well.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 07 Apr 2011, 17:11
So today was eclair day! I have to make some eclairs with chocolate whipped cream for my practical exam in a week and a half, so I baked out some choux paste, dipped them in tempered chocolate, and filled them with chocolate whipped cream and orange-spice pastry cream. They were pretty good but could use some work, firstly in the topping, since tempered chocolate is good for a sit-down plated dessert eclair, but much less useful if you are holding it and munching it. Ganache is better. I do not like fondant at all, though, it is just like a waste of sugar. Why even bother doing that?
Filling was good, pastry cream was a stunner, I'm keeping that recipe. Simmered some cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and orange peel in the milk before making the P.Cream with it, then made it with a bit extra starch and added some fresh-squeezed OJ when it was done. Worked well.
Chocolate whipped cream was just 1 cup cream 2 tbsp cocoa 2 tbsp sugar, was OK but next to the gorgeous pastry cream was pretty bland. I am going to have to try out a recipe with melted chocolate folded in next, I expect the texture may be nicer on that.
Also drizzled the tops with orange-coloured white chocolate for garnish. I tried a few things, my favorite was striping 45-degrees off-set to the line of the eclair.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 08 Apr 2011, 01:51
Tomorrow I think I am going to a Morning Market class, where we spend five hours going round the markets in Paris to buy fresh produce, then go back to the kitchen and cook a three-course meal with it, and then eat the meal! It's a gift from my employer for my birthday and as a leaving present and I could never have afforded to do something like this myself. I'm excited about it :D There's a nice litle market in Cambridge which often has fruit and vegetable stalls and an amazing cheese stall, so hopefully I'll be more inspired to shop there instead of always going to Sainsburys. I'll let you know what we cook.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jmrz on 09 Apr 2011, 21:03
I offered to cook/help cook for my friends the other night. They are three boys who all live together and I think they have used their kitchen about two or three times to actually make a proper meal in. They eat out all the time and it is ridiculous. When I offered to cook, my friend suggested salmon, and I said I'd never had it before (aside from the once, on sushi that he made me try, and I also liked). After he got over the shock of that, we went to the shops and got supplies! Yay delicious dinner.

Maple glazed salmon, mash, corn, greens. (I've never had asparagus either which is why I only have one piece there, it was good as well!).

(http://28.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ljdr2r2LAM1qaukljo1_500.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 09 Apr 2011, 22:12
Salmon and asparagus is like my go-to meal when I am eating alone, it is delicious and so easy and also healthy! Yay! I like baking the salmon in foil with lemon and herbs.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Tom on 09 Apr 2011, 22:19
Foil or baking paper, parcelling the fish and then baking it is my favorite way to do it. It also means less mess.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jmrz on 09 Apr 2011, 22:39
Yeah, we covered it in some olive oil and then coated it with the maple glaze (maple syrup, fresh lime and uh... a bunch of other stuff Luke put in it, I wasn't paying too much attention as I was doing the veges). It was DELICIOUS. I will have to investigate the lemon and herbs/foil thing. That sounds really delicious.

Do you just use mixed herbs?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Tom on 09 Apr 2011, 23:32
Depends what you want. With salmon I tend to use either whole basil leaves/make a pesto with pine nuts or you could go with lemon, horseradish, shallots and dill (one of my favourites).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: est on 10 Apr 2011, 03:19
Just made chicken & mushroom pasta with crushed tomatoes, onion, garlic & tarragon.  It turned out pretty delicious!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 10 Apr 2011, 03:37
While all the autumn pine mushrooms (or saffron milkcaps, if you prefer) are available in Australia, there's a really delicious and simple recipe I like to cook.

Cut a red capsicum into strips, chop up a bunch of pine mushrooms (noting that pine mushrooms don't reduce as much as other mushrooms when you cook them), and chop some spring onions (even though they're not really in season at the moment - do as your conscience allows you, I guess), and cook them all together in a frying pan with some olive oil (cook the capsicum for a while by itself first so that it gets nice and sweet). In a saucepan, cook some couscous (pearl couscous is particularly good for this recipe), and in another saucepan steam some fish (salmon works really well, but I've also used trout). When everything's cooked, cut the fish into chunks and just toss everything together, seasoning with pepper and salt, and serve.

Cooks in minutes and it tastes great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 11 Apr 2011, 21:21
Today, I made mac and cheese in a rice cooker.  It was pretty good.  I was impressed. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: jmrz on 11 Apr 2011, 23:14
Wait, you can do that? I have a rice cooker and I only ever use it to cook rice. How is this done? I've only ever had mac and cheese once and it was homemade so I enjoyed it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: allison on 11 Apr 2011, 23:23
Fun trivia: Roger Ebert wrote a whole book of rice cooker recipes
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Eris on 11 Apr 2011, 23:25
mac and cheese isn't that hard. cook pasta, melt cheese over said pasta (possibly in the oven), maybe with some cheesy white sauce in it to make it saucier.

BAM.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 11 Apr 2011, 23:31
I just cook pasta and then stir grated cheese through it. Easiest dinner ever.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 11 Apr 2011, 23:40
I do that maybe two or three times a year if circumstances have led me to not have a proper meal available. Usually I drizzle some olive oil and grind some pepper and chop some parsley into it, too, so I can pretend that in the moment of eating that meal I at least have a little bit of class and dignity left.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 11 Apr 2011, 23:53
Pfft, class and dignity. Sometimes I swig red wine straight from the $5 bottle to add to the experience.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 12 Apr 2011, 00:20
here's the mac and cheese you're going to make.

you're going to need four cheeses, and i recommend making one of them a sharp cheddar of some description and the other one either romano or parmesan. the last two you'll want to select based on the flavours you're going on, and you'll also want to consider whether or not you'll be adding anything extra like say peas or bacon or whatever. gruyere and emmenthal are good go-tos, although a smoked gouda would add some depth and richness. there's a lot of cheeses out there so like use your judgment. you'll be making this in a skillet, so make sure you have about say two cups of the cheddar and one cup of the other cheese, roughly grated. you'll need about a cup of the parmesan, finely grated. if you're feeling sassy you can go half-and-half with parmesan and another nice fine-grated cheese, like asiago or pecorino romano. the recipe is for an eleven-inch skillet, i should mention, so if these numbers sound stupid for that size of skillet then you can always adjust.

first thing to do is make the pasta. in an 11" skillet you'll want about a pound. cook it just north of al dente; you don't want it to be too edible just yet.

next step is probably to make the stuff you'll put on top. get about two cups worth of breadcrumbs and mix them with some chopped herbs and about half of the the finely-grated cheese. set it aside and preheat the oven to 400˚F.

you're going to then take out your cast iron skillet and make a quick butter-based roux with two parts milk and one part cream. this too you can mix up although you're going to be using a bunch of cheese so it might be a little over-the-top. whisk in a small amount of dry mustard, a few pinches (no more than a half-teaspoon) of kosher salt, and if you're an asshole you can mix in hot sauce. i'm not an asshole so i don't do that. add the remaining half-cup of finely grated cheese and whisk it so it melts and incorporates. then add the other cheeses, stirring the whole time.

now you've got your sauce. turn the heat off. stir in your drained pasta slowly, making sure that as it goes in you're coating it with the sauce. if you're adding something else this is the place to do it, as well. when it's all added top it with your breadcrumb mixture. break a few pieces of butter off your stick and put them on top. be smart and deliberate; although you're definitely in for a penny, in for a pound w/r/t calories here, you also want to be smart and make sure you're just doing this so that the breadcrumbs crisp up and the dish is nicely balanced from top to bottom. put the skillet in the oven (friendly tip: put a baking sheet underneath it so that any spillover goes onto that and not the floor of your oven) and let it bake for 20-25 minutes.

the result is like seriously beautiful and if you're on top of your game you can have it ready inside of a half-hour. it's also the most delicious heart murder possible, basically. if you can make the roux with duck fat you've got the regular recipe topped but that's about the only way.

and the really nice part is that this is a recipe for everyone. have a family? make 'em mac and cheese. have roommates? do this and then weasel your way out of some chores. have a girlfriend or boyfriend? make this for him or her and watch the swooning commence; just don't expect this date to end in sex or really anything other than laying around with a big smile on your face and trying not to pass out. live on your own? well, okay, here's the best part: the first round of this stuff is really good. but leftovers preserve really well, especially if you mix everything all up and put it in another container and then whenever you want another serving you just slap a helping of it into a hot and barely-oiled pan and make fucking pan-fried macaroni and cheese. this can last you like a week and you honestly don't get sick of it. which is good; making it costs a bit of cash due to the cheese expenditure but if you're the only person eating it then you can stretch that investment out for several meals.

the best side dish is a braised green. get some kale or chard or something and while the macaroni bakes chop and sauté the greens quickly with some garlic and shallots then cover them with a nice sharp braising liquid, like a wine vinegar. turn the heat way down and let them gently cook. drain them of the braising liquid when you're done and serve on the side; the acidity of a properly-made braised green is a wonderful balance for the rich gut-bomb you're serving as a main course.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 12 Apr 2011, 00:23
doing it in a rice cooker is more than acceptable, by the by. but that's the dish you make when you want macaroni, cheese, dignity, and class.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 12 Apr 2011, 00:30
Okay I normally shun recipes that use a roux or cheese sauce because I really hate white sauces but you've sold me on that one, Johnny. The only problem is I don't have a skillet that can be ovened.

My nan used to crumble potato chips on top of her cauliflower bake and I remember that being the best part of it, can I try that if I do not want to buy breadcrumbs and have them sit in a jar for years and years like what happened last time I bought breadcrumbs? I never buy actual bread (or if I do, it's a French loaf and there are no survivors) and I don't know if my cheapo blender made it to my new house so fresh breadcrumbs are out.

Also if the only fresh herb I have is basil, is that cool or do I need oregano and sage and marjoram and crazy stuff? Is it ok if I used dried herbs?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 12 Apr 2011, 00:41
you don't have a skillet that can be ovened? go get a cast iron skillet, you can find one for twenty bucks pretty darn easy and it's the most valuable thing to have in your pantry although you probably know that and have a good reason and i'm being a dick foreven bringing it up. i suppose you can make all the other stuff in separate dishes and then use a casserole dish for the actual mac & cheese but the nice part about the skillet is that you do literally everything in that one dish. breadcrumbs you can use potato chips or you can probably just go to a place that sells bulk stuff and buy some breadcrumbs; you might even be able to find some with herbs in already. either that or go get panko since panko is hella versatile and wicked proper crunchy. basil is fine and of course dried herbs are okay; if you have parsley and some other whatever that'll be alright. they mostly add colour and a bit of aromatic depth to the thing, they're not the most important ingredient.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 12 Apr 2011, 01:05
Twenty bucks I do not have! Casserole dishes I have aplenty. I have a French oven that I got for Christmas but I don't think the lid handle can be ovened, that is ok though since I guess you don't need the lid here.
Maybe I should ask for a skillet for Easter as my mother was very upset when I told her that I did not want any chocolate please.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 12 Apr 2011, 03:38
Casserole dishes are just fine for mac and cheese.

I rekcon the four cheeses is overdoing it a bit, especially if you're using a proper mature cheddar. I usually go with two. Mind you, I also add garlic. Measuring cheese is also something I don't bother with (actually, unless I'm baking something, I just about never measure). If it looks thick enough, it is, if it doesn't, add more cheese. When making the roux, remember that the longer you fry the flour, the darker it will be so if you're using lighter cheese but want a darker mac then let it get nice and brown. If you're adding garlic, add it at this point in the roux to fry.

Johnny C is also remiss in not mentioning nutmeg as a great ingredient in a mac and cheese, it really adds another dimension, I put it in my favourite version, which is a mild cheddar, Spanich Manchego and basil. For the topping I don't mess about with butter on the breadcrumbs, just mix in some parmesan an the result will be ten time better.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 12 Apr 2011, 05:02
This is how I make mac and cheese too, although if you only have one cheese that is fine, as long as that one cheese is a good sharp cheddar. Also if you slice a tomato on top of the breadcrumbs before baking, all the better.

Panfrying the leftovers is nice to do in slices, but that works best if you baked in a casserole dish rather than a skillet.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 12 Apr 2011, 05:22
yeah, usually I make it with a sauce and bake it.  We are trying out things that can be cooked in a hotel room though.  The recipe was 2 cups pasta, 1.5 cups broth in the rice cooker for 15 min then add 1 cup milk and 1.5 cups cheese plus any seasonings you wand, 15-20 more min.  Because of the hot on the bottom it comes out with a crispy crust like baked mac and cheese. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 12 Apr 2011, 05:30
Things I use to make mac and cheese: a pot and a casserole dish. I do not have a cast iron skillet. Actually I think our stove would break if you put one on it.

Anywho, mac and cheese without a roux is not nearly as good. Johnny's recipe actually sounds pretty close to what I use (with exception to the specific cheeses and I like adding a little bit of garlic to my breadcrumbs). Like seriously, people have made mac and cheese without breadcrumbs and no roux and it's just not the same. You are missing out, people without breadcrumbs and roux. (It's one of my favorite foods, don't judge me.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 12 Apr 2011, 05:53
Oh man, you guys made me hungry for mac & cheese so I decided to whip some up even though it isn't even 9 in the morning yet. I had my roux started when I realized I was almost out of macaroni and so I dug around and found dried TORTELLINI!!!

This is going to be the best vacation breakfast ever. I used cheddar, a parmesan/romano blend, chevre, and neufchatal. Dry mustard and Mural of Flavor from Penzey's in the sauce. Saltine crumbs on top.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 12 Apr 2011, 07:10
Man, that sounds like heaven. I'm making mac and cheese for dinner tomorrow if I have time. I may prep it tonight, who knows!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Metope on 12 Apr 2011, 10:18
I usually go to the cafe across the road and say 'can I have mac & cheese, please?'.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 13 Apr 2011, 12:40
Before I leap off into the great unknown, has anyone here done any cooking with nettles?

If so, advices please.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Apr 2011, 13:09
I've eaten nettle soup, and it was good, but I've never made it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Apr 2011, 15:14
the thing about that macaroni recipe is that it's perfectly servicable at like two cheeses. but, like, if you have the time and advance thought, why not just go to a deli or butcher and get yr cheese mongered for you? if you buy what you need rather than a brick it's a reasonable price.

eed – it can actually probably work with a bunch of different pastas. tortellini is a nice and easy choice. so long as it's small and shaped and holds sauce well you're golden.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Apr 2011, 15:21
Before I leap off into the great unknown, has anyone here done any cooking with nettles?

If so, advices please.

no, BUT 1) use gloves use gloves use gloves use gloves 2) from what i understand they have a pleasant and light woody flavour to them so they'd go well, likely, with pork or chicken. to whit: this recipe looks awesome (http://theyearinfood.com/2010/02/gnocchi-with-braised-pork-and-nettles.html#axzz1JRbtIVdF).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 13 Apr 2011, 15:43
Guys. GUESS WHAT I AM MAKING FOR DINNER RIGHT NOW.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 13 Apr 2011, 15:50
mac & cheese
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: SirJuggles on 13 Apr 2011, 16:06
Nettles
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Apr 2011, 16:14
Pizza, you lazy nerd.  :lol:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 13 Apr 2011, 16:45
I made pizza.

Because I am lazy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 13 Apr 2011, 16:56
Nettle pizza?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 13 Apr 2011, 18:36
Pizza, you lazy nerd.  :lol:

Wrong. I do not make pizza! I order it. DUH.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 13 Apr 2011, 18:39
There's the problem with a tiny screen. I forgot you said "making" and answered as if you said "having." How was your mac & cheese?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 13 Apr 2011, 19:32
Delicious.

(http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b198/andthentherewaslindsey/mac.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 14 Apr 2011, 01:11

no, BUT 1) use gloves use gloves use gloves use gloves

I grew up in the country, I know all about the usual effects of nettles. I've spotted a patc close to where I live and made sure that it has a ready supply of dock leaves.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 14 Apr 2011, 04:15
Today I got myself some lamb shanks (saltbush lamb, fuck yeah!), some carrots, some onions, some Russian garlic, some tomatoes, some stock, some red wine, some olive oil, some bay leaves, some sage leaves, some oregano, some thyme, some salt, some pepper, and some anchovies, and I stuck it all in a pot and I put it in a slow oven for the afternoon and I got myself a stew goin'.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: calenlass on 14 Apr 2011, 08:48
Johnny, not everyone has cast iron cookware available for such low prices. One of my friends in the UK has been looking for a skillet for literally years because the ones that are large enough are only available from industrial suppliers. So don't be such a racist.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 14 Apr 2011, 08:53
How big a pan are they looking for?? You can get an 11" Lodge Logic (not the greatest brand but whatever how different does straight up cast iron get?) grill pan or skillet off Amazon for like 17 bucks.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 14 Apr 2011, 09:23
Right, here we go.

Firstly a big pile of nettles
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5070/5619611518_8139bbace5.jpg)

Stripped from the stalks
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5184/5619613192_4681d3a4e2.jpg)

Washed and put in a pan to simmer
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5268/5619028325_640a415c4e.jpg)

And with a bit of butter melted in.
(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5028/5619619256_4808d341c3.jpg)

Not a bad taste, but not that powerful or strong. Going to mix it into some mashed potato and serve with lamb and aubergine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 14 Apr 2011, 16:35
Johnny, not everyone has cast iron cookware available for such low prices. One of my friends in the UK has been looking for a skillet for literally years because the ones that are large enough are only available from industrial suppliers. So don't be such a racist.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kitchen-Craft-Clearview-Grill-Plain/dp/B000PABYNC/ref=pd_cp_kh_1 ????
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 15 Apr 2011, 00:12
And here is the end result.

(http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5228/5620796979_6c602aca24.jpg)

All I can say is that it looked a lot more appealing when I was eating it and it was very tasty too. Now consulting Richard Mabey's Food for Free to see what to forrage next.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 15 Apr 2011, 07:37
I came from school yesterday, and threw some eggs, a red onion, mushrooms, parsley, zucchinis, and some maple syrup flavoured bacon in a bowl and had an omelet. Tossed a bit of cheese while it was on the pan. It was awesome. Had a bit of tabbouleh as an aside. It was awesome.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 15 Apr 2011, 07:56
Made hot cross bread and butter pudding yesterday, was amazing. Pics to follow.

And for lunch I made me and my bro a pretty rad salad that consisted of lettuce, radishes, fennel, black pepper, olive oil, french pizza oil, lightly fried and seasoned chicken, and ribbons of egg which was essentially like 5 eggy pancakes rolled up together to make a linguine sort of thing. I didn't know that adding pepper, mixed herbs and other stuff to eggs could make them so damn tasty.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 15 Apr 2011, 08:28
french pizza oil

?

This is a new concept to me
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 15 Apr 2011, 14:02
"Lesieur pizza oil    

The oil for delicately spiced dishes

This culinary preparation containing sunflower oil harmoniously combines the piquancy of chili peppers with the flavour of coriander and the scent of aromatic herbs.
Discover all the flavour of delicious, spicy cuisine."

Sorry Lesieur, I do not usually associate sunflowers, chili peppers, and coriander with the authentic flavor of pizza.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 Apr 2011, 16:39
No, but those would all work well for dipping the crust in.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 16 Apr 2011, 07:45
The "Huile pour Pizza" I have in my house is essentially really old chili-infused olive oil. It is spicy but makes everything taste better. If I've got lettuce, I've got the huile.

Hot Cross Bread and Butter Pudding was eaten to death, before my camera had charged. Major sad-face.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 Apr 2011, 13:07
Last night I stayed at a friend's house and we cooked stuffed cabbage leaves. I can't give you the recipe because I don't have it (because it was in french) but basically it was blanched cabbage leaves in little dishes, with a stuffing of pine nuts, shredded cabbage, coriander, chives, other things that go in stuffing, It was amazing! I also made a sauce to dip vegetables in, which I was very proud of - it was creme fraiche, summer whey, powdered fennel, cinnamon, white pepper, salt, ginger and maybe something else too. I've never really done this kind of cooking completely from scratch just for a regular meal and it's great!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Ozymandias on 17 Apr 2011, 18:49
Hold on, you stuffed cabbage with more cabbage?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 18:51
if anyone posts an xzibit joke in response to jordan i'll fucking take them out
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 17 Apr 2011, 18:54
yo dawg
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 19:05
sorry liz, you're dead
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 19:06
i did not want it to end this way but alas it is as the scryer foretold
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Theriandros on 17 Apr 2011, 19:10
Infusing my olive oil with garlic has been a revelation. I am SO HAPPY dipping my warm fresh bread in it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 17 Apr 2011, 19:12
sorry liz, you're dead

That's not fair, when you said you'd take her out she assumed you meant for dinner! This is a thread all about food, after all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 19:16
i usually don't preface that with the adverb form of "fucking"
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 19:17
"do you want to fucking go to a movie or concert maybe?" –me, apparently, in harry's mind
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: tania on 17 Apr 2011, 19:31
yeah i'm down
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 17 Apr 2011, 19:41
Fuck yeah let's go
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 20:11
alright dickshits, anything catch your eye at the bitchballing megaplex
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 17 Apr 2011, 20:14
Fuck: The Movie
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 17 Apr 2011, 20:17
Can we hit the Dairy Queen afterwards you cocksucker?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 20:26
i'm actually going to go get a blizzard tonight
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 17 Apr 2011, 21:26
alright dickshits, anything catch your eye at the bitchballing megaplex

A David Mamet film I guess?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 17 Apr 2011, 22:05
alright well let's get our fuckasses moving you shitstarters and catch a flick by that cockpussy david mamet
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Liz on 18 Apr 2011, 07:02
Johnny C I love you.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 18 Apr 2011, 22:07
Today I made Carnitas for my fiancee, i have started making her things for when she gets off work on my day off since she work right by my house, but it's turning into a great thing.  Pictures:
Right before it went into the oven:(http://a1.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/216467_1339174086580_1447981039_31025228_6753871_n.jpg) I had grilled it and smoked it outside at this point and had made all the braising liquid stuff inside, put it together and into the over for 4 hours
(http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/205820_1339174286585_1447981039_31025229_3455230_n.jpg)
Drain the liquid into a pot for reduction and cool then shred and you have this.  I reduced the liquid by half to where it was a salty, sweet, spicy glaze then poured it over
(http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/218028_1339174566592_1447981039_31025230_7426_n.jpg)
Home made pico de gallo, salsa, and local tortillas still hot off the press.  Should have bought local beer to go with it but alas.
(http://a8.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/207951_1339175206608_1447981039_31025232_4796722_n.jpg)
This is the woman I'll be cooking for for the rest of my life, I'm a lucky guy.

This was my first time making the carnitas, but luckily my knowledge helped me to just put together what i recognized as flavors and what I know of cooking into some of the best tacos I've ever had.  Smoked carnitas are what it's about.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 18 Apr 2011, 22:12
All of those pictures would be so much better looking without those filters.
I love Mexican but my boyfriend can't cook so I settle for cooking it myself (with a little bit of Max help)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 18 Apr 2011, 22:17
carnitas are so great to make at home and really easy. i used the recipe on serious eats and came up with this:

(http://a4.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/183288_512128898642_122100375_30482891_1460115_n.jpg)

the trick is that after you've taken the pork out & drained it you toss it onto a baking sheet and pop it under the broiler until the edges get crispy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: abadname on 18 Apr 2011, 22:19
Yeah, thats what i did after i shredded it and soaked it in it's sweet reduced liquor.  It's not carnitas without the crispy ends.

I knew how to make it i suppose just from working in restaurants and seeing it finished but i hadn't made this particular dish from scratch.  Braising is my favorite cooking method most of the time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 18 Apr 2011, 23:47
Making burgers tomorrow, what should I put on it?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 19 Apr 2011, 00:04
Hendersons Relish.

When I make burgers I don't usually bother with binding with egg if I'm going to cook straight away, just meat, herbs breadcrumbs and cheese. Put them in some ciabatta rounds and top with some diced pomodoro tomato, shredded lettuce (anything but iceberg) some homemade bacon bits, a layer of mayonnaise and mustard underneath the burger and a dash of Hendersons on the top part of the bun. Some HP on the side for dipping and the chips.

Make your own chips as well, always worth the effort. I like to use desiree potatoes for this and leave the skin on. Cut into chips, boil for about five minutes, drain very well, coat in sunflower oil, spread on a baking sheet and cook in a hot oven until they look tasty. For our colonial cousins, don't cut them into chips, cut them into fries instead, about the size of your little finger or bigger if you're small.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 19 Apr 2011, 00:24
If you're using fresh beef, don't bother using any binding agents. So long as you shape them nicely, get them onto a hot surface, and let them cook long enough to sear before the first flip, you really shouldn't need anything in there except the beef. And definitely don't add herbs or nothing! What's the deal with that! Just make sure you salt both sides immediately before cooking.

Although I love going crazy on toppings, I'm a simple dude at heart, so I like basic stuff. Caramelize some onions in advance and sauté some mushrooms, then top your burger with American cheese. Put on some pickles and some barbecue sauce as well, if you're feeling super crazy. Alternatively, just do pickles, onions, and cheese, which was what I did last time I made burgers. It hardly needs more than that.

If you're feeling out there and want to test some waters ahead of me, I was going to try making a burger with braised fennel and a dill and cheese sauce similar to green chile sauce; my main problem is that I haven't been able to figure out something that'll contrast how rich that would be. Maybe braising the fennel in something sharp and tangy, like a balsamic vinegar?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 19 Apr 2011, 00:45
And definitely don't add herbs or nothing! What's the deal with that!

The deal with that is that is that adding herbs or spices to the meat adds to the flavour. You're adding to the flavour by putting it in the toppings so what's the difference with adding it in the meat? Putting it in there just means that it has an opportunity to mix with the salt and the fat. If I wanted just the taste of meat then I'd be eating steak. Burgers open up a whole world of flavour, be a shame to waste it by making an inferior version of steak. Adding a herb or a spice means that you start with the wonderful flavour of the seared outside meat and then work through the meatiness and roll out into a beatiul aftertaste of your own designing. Also the reason I add breadcrumbs to the meat is that it holds in a bit more of the fat, which is where the flavour is.

Worth noting that beef isn't always the best meat for burger, I've had some better results with lamb, pork and a combination of beef and pork. Beef and chorizo with basil was different and I'd need to work on the recipie but I reckon it has some potential. It wasn't a bad burger, but not flat out amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 19 Apr 2011, 00:55
You've actually identified the issue I have with adding herbs and other sundry to a burger, which is that, if you treat it right, a beef burger can be really akin to steak in terms of quality and flavour. The difference is that, especially if you're using fresh beef, you want to taste the beef, for it to have a flavour that stands on its own. I usually go with a three-meat blend when I'm making fresh burgers; I get the butcher to grind me a mix of sirloin, brisket, and chuck. If I'm feeling really sassy I get oxtail in there instead of the chuck, since it's a wonderful cut. The aftertaste I want out of that isn't an aftertaste of herbs or garlic or whatever, it's just the round and present taste of beef. This is also why I try and keep the toppings complementary, rather than things that drown out that flavour; you want to heighten the taste of the meat, not overwhelm it or subdue it. And the difference with toppings is that those don't cook into the meat and the meat doesn't absorb their flavour. Instead, they contrast it. That's what you wanna aim for.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 19 Apr 2011, 01:45
If it's going to be akin to steak in quality and flavour, why even go to the bother of grinding it up?

I'm not saying you're wrong, sometimes it's great to really focus on the beef flavour, but sometimes there's beauty in the artful combination of flavours and it's just as complementary as toppings, if not better. Burgers have had al kinds of stuff put in them for hundreds of years and for a reason. One of the things for me is that I'll probably attend a fair few barbeques over spring and summer and often it'll just be plain beef and many of them will be good. If I do the same with them at home, then I'm just repeating what I had last week and it gets boring after a while. What I really want to aim for is that perfect rolling journey of flavours across the tongue against a beautiful meaty background.

I had a burger once that was steak and liver combined. Now that was a serious stand alone beef flavour, you might like to give that a go.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 19 Apr 2011, 02:08
That's a really interesting idea! I feel like you'd want to be careful that the grassy, tangy liver doesn't overtake the comparatively mild steak, and I think you'd also probably have to be careful about doneness with that, but it could work nicely.

As for the burger having the quality and flavour of a nice, regular cut of meat – well, why not? Doing ground chuck is certainly okay, but if you can make it better, why not go ahead and do so? Seems to answer itself, to me.

(also the reason they've had stuff put in them is the same, historically, as most other additives – it helped cut down on the cost and stretch them thinner so that more can be sold without more meat having to be produced.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 19 Apr 2011, 02:21
Spices and herbs are hardly a cost cutting exercise.

The liver didn't overtake the steak and the doneness wasn't a problem. You can have liver a bit rare anyway.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 19 Apr 2011, 07:35
minced onions, worcestershire.  I do this with 80/20 grocery store ground beef which has been in my freezer for weeks.  It is the best.  No breadcrumbs, no eggs, no nonsense.  I feel like adding breadcrumbs and eggs makes burgers meatloafy which, while I love meatloaf, is not a burger. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 19 Apr 2011, 12:16
Well, since I'm a student and don't wish to feast on fatty, chewy beef, I'm going to try and do a lot of bean burgers this summer. I've got a crap ton of beans (We're talking cannellini beans, kidney beans, borlotti beans) and split peas (yellow, green) that I can bind together. Chop 'em roughly, and then just bind together like regular burgers. Will save money, and my arteries.

Doing it with pork is an interesting idea, I'll have to try that one out...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: beat mouse on 19 Apr 2011, 14:34
(http://a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/196681_10150115895516016_514581015_6950389_1861234_n.jpg)
apologies for monster sized picture of monster sized perogie burger.

delicious delicious perogie burger. baconweave, cheddar, perogies, sauted sweet onions, sour cream, ketchup, mmmmmm so good.
tuesday is the day i dedicate myself to getting the meat sweats.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 19 Apr 2011, 14:41
I hashed it out a bit with Johnny last night and I decided to go with Canadian back bacon, arugula, Home-made aioli and American cheese. Still debating whether or not to sautee or caramelise some onions and throw them on as well
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 19 Apr 2011, 19:16
what happened to the chevre! also i don't think you need onions on that, it might throw things a bit outta wack.

sourdough bread, tomatoes (i'm sorry florida wage slaves :(), lettuce, garlic-peppercorn mayo w/ a lil bacon grease mixed back in, and "excuse me mr. butcher how thick can you slice it" "however thick you want" bacon:

(http://a3.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/207962_515528086642_122100375_30494876_7655094_n.jpg)

Suckadick Fools We Postseason
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 19 Apr 2011, 23:32
what happened to the chevre! also i don't think you need onions on that, it might throw things a bit outta wack.

As weird as it sounds, putting American cheese on my burger constitutes "changing it up". I've done the chevre thing a bunch before (you tend to eat a bunch of goat's cheese when you date a girl with a dairy allergy for 3+ years, not that I'm complaining), plus I already had American in the fridge plus I'm not too keen on keeping soft cheese around when I'm the only one who'd be eating it, it'd probably just go bad.

I went with onions too, cooked on super-low heat in some olive oil until they were just starting to turn brown. They didn't throw anything out of whack. Actually the burger was just about goddamn perfect, the only problem with it was I went a bit too heavy on the garlic in the aioli, but only barely.

All in all it was definitely worth the fact that I can't cook anything in my kitchen without setting off the smoke alarm. Also, I had peanut butter m&ms for desert. Fuck yeah.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 24 Apr 2011, 11:39
(http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/3873/dscf5350v.jpg)
hey look it's my final exam!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Scarychips on 24 Apr 2011, 11:53
I'm giving you a D...
For Delicious
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 24 Apr 2011, 12:37
Hell yeah James! Do you know how you did yet?

p.s; Bread,
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 24 Apr 2011, 12:43
congratulations james! (how'd heather do?)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Metope on 24 Apr 2011, 12:43
Oh by the way, James, if your teachers ever need any help on judging the taste of the stuff you make, let them know I'll be glad to help.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 24 Apr 2011, 14:37
I do not know how Heather did! I did not-as-well-as-I-should-have-liked, on account of a bunch of things just not going right, which is a shame. My theory marks and my assignment marks and my classroom marks are all good so it is not a bomb but it could have been better.
Pretty pleased with everything I've learned, though. Made some fun desserts for tonight, too: was going to make charlotte royale but my mom is avoiding cream so I didn't want to make the bavarian cream, so instead I stacked little towers of jelly-roll slice, creme chiboust (pastry cream & italian meringue), ground hazlenuts, jelly roll, creme chiboust, and strawberry allumettes. Would have taken pictures but we just ate them instead.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LeeC on 27 Apr 2011, 12:02
this summer i am making this
(http://www.photoblip.com/images/737/120db2684cf7633b2c5fb1767de6db22.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 27 Apr 2011, 12:23
the fuck
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 27 Apr 2011, 12:24
lookin so delicious
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 28 Apr 2011, 00:02
Triple decker pizza I presume.

At a guess, sourced from thisiswhyyourefat.com
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 28 Apr 2011, 00:07
Confession: about 95% of the food posted by our American friends in this thread makes me almost gag in disgust just looking at it.

Oh wait, this isn't the confession thread! Silly me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 28 Apr 2011, 00:41
Those pizzas look really dry and not delicious at all.
And I LOVE pizza.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 28 Apr 2011, 09:04
Well, it's frozen pizza, what do you expect?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 28 Apr 2011, 12:00
OK let's re-examine this concept and snazz it up a bit. It is novel enough but we've got to apply some critical thought to it to make it worthwhile.

First off, it's got to be thin & crispy & hollow crust, otherwise it's going to be a hassle to eat. Bam, easy one.
Next up, toppings: do we want each tier to have the same toppings or mix it up more in the same level? Bottom level's got to be mostly thin-shaved meats, I think, so we'll throw on some peperoni or whatever you've got plus crumbled ground beef/sausage, but not too much. Second layer would be chicken/spinach/roasted red peppers by my preference, and then I think I'd want the top guys to be cheesey mostly, so lets hit them with mozza, feta, parmesean, and, I don't know, a little bit of blue? Would probably put mozza parmesean on all of the mini-pizzas, and then half of them get feta and half of them get blue cheese, yes, that will work. That would be my first thought.

I know some people like barbecue chicken pizza, but frankly, I can not get behind that shit. If you were so inclined, making the middle layer a barbecue chicken layer could certainly be nice, but apart from that I am trying to think of more sauce variations to use here. Could always cook a bunch of dried tomatoes in with the sauce for the top or maybe middle layers to punch up the acidity like mad for a contrasting level of flavour. Some garlic-cheesey white sauce marbled in with the tomato sauce on one of the layers could be interesting too?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 28 Apr 2011, 15:58
OK new take: Middle-tier pizzas should be rosemary, sweet potato (thin thin sliced), ground turkey, olive oil, and mozza-parmesean (no tomato sauce). That is one of the best pizzas I have made, and gives us a sweet-savory poultry contrast layer. What can go on with the tops and bottoms?
Tops could be adorable little spinach-feta-roasted red pepper because that makes it the Italian colours, which is an easy out for pizza. I like that, and then the bottom tier can be rich meats.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 28 Apr 2011, 16:01
I love barbecue chicken pizza, but only from this one pizza franchise with woodfire crust, really good smoky sauce, roast chicken, spanish onion, mushroom, and tons of fetta. Awww yeaaaaah.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 28 Apr 2011, 16:17
Man oh man I have got to get another sourdough culture on the go so I can make some awesome pizzas again. This summer should see a first attempt at cooking pizza on my barbecue for smokey effect (there are many reasons for this to work, as well as some reasons for it not to work).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: BlakeJustBlake on 29 Apr 2011, 03:59
Has anyone ever nixtamalized corn? I've wanted to for awhile, but I don't really know where to find the right kind of lime stuff.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lunchbox on 29 Apr 2011, 05:02
I just learnt a new word.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nixtamalization
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 01 May 2011, 15:10
It might be a bit late for a hamburger contribution, but I had one the other day that was dressed with what seemed to be a balsamic reduction. My head nearly exploded at how simple but good it was. Definitely something I need to steal in the near future. I can't recall the cheese; I think it was gouda. I'm not a bread expert, so I have no idea what it was, but I sort-of liked it; was fairly chewy but still had a toasty top.  

I bought more stout than I should probably drunk, so I'm considering cooking with it. Any suggestions besides the standard Irish stew or ribs? I can't imagine the IPAs/pale ales are that good for cooking. Partial beer list (http://i.imgur.com/F2C8W.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Johnny C on 09 May 2011, 13:18
OK new take: Middle-tier pizzas should be rosemary, sweet potato (thin thin sliced), ground turkey, olive oil, and mozza-parmesean (no tomato sauce). That is one of the best pizzas I have made, and gives us a sweet-savory poultry contrast layer. What can go on with the tops and bottoms?

no turkey! keep that layer's protein limited to a nut of some kind!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 09 May 2011, 14:05
Nuts, I like that! Would go wonderfully with the sweet potato. I would think pecans or walnuts probably.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 10 May 2011, 23:00
Cooked a sweet rhubarb quiche last night and it was tasty.

Pre-cooked some sweet pastry and added stewed rhubarb, topped with a mixture of beaten eggs, milk, single cream, sugar, raisins, a pinch of ground cloves and some nutmeg. Gave it a quick stir to mix up the rhubarb a bit and baked for 40 minutes on a moderate heat. Nice, quick and easy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 11 May 2011, 06:10
At what point is a sweet quiche just a pie?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 11 May 2011, 07:02
Maybe it's a quiche because of the egg+milk?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 11 May 2011, 07:36
Yeah it is still a quiche but some people reserve the term for savoury quiches. You could call it a custard pie instead if you wanted.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 14 May 2011, 13:08
At what point is cheesecake a giant tart?

Always.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 14 May 2011, 13:16
Are you sure?  I thought a tart implied pastry, and my cheesecakes are made with a base of crumbled digestive biscuits.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 14 May 2011, 17:03
Does a different crust disqualify it from being a pastry? I'm not certain on the semantics. That being said, it's still more of a custard pie than  "cake" no? I just take meaningless contention with the word cheese "cake".

Is your cheesecake fluffy or dense? I'm a personal fan of the dense.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 15 May 2011, 01:06
Dense, heavy  even - and no egg, so it's not a custard either.  It's not a cake or a pie, but only a cheesecake.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 15 May 2011, 06:05
Dense. So very dense. Fluffy cheesecakes are nowhere near as good.

Hey James, another option to consider for the sweet/savory layer is prosciutto and fig. These things are amazing together on a pizza with olive oil, a little garlic, and mozzarella. SO GOOD.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 15 May 2011, 06:37
So my parents went to Scotland and brought me back a haggis! It was big and it was tasty. I didn't take a picture and it doesn't really look all that great, but had it with potatoes and greens (due to me having no "Neeps") so yeah, everyone get on the weirder parts of animals.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 15 May 2011, 07:34
I saw Daniel Kitson perform his latest show a few weeks ago and among other things he mentioned flapjacks (the British version), and I remembered how my English grandfather used to love them, so yesterday I made some using a recipe I found on the internet and they were easy and delicious.

Yum, I haven't had flapjacks for eight years.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: gospel on 15 May 2011, 08:16
Dense, heavy  even - and no egg, so it's not a custard either.  It's not a cake or a pie, but only a cheesecake.
No egg? Interesting. I would like to subscribe to your cooking newsletter.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: David_Dovey on 15 May 2011, 14:13
Who puts egg in cheesecake? Why would you do that

(i mean except in the base i guess)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 15 May 2011, 16:31
So I used to sneer at rice-cookers, but now I use one every single day... only occasionally to cook rice. It's a damned useful appliance for slowly and leisurely making stews and soups on long days full of studying and movies.

Other recent discoveries: sourdough bread is easy and good; yogurt is better strained than runny, and is an excellent ice-cream substitute. Made a sort of yogurt chocolate stracciatella ice cream the other day and it was delish. Some extra cream, sugar, honey, vanilla, white chocolate, dark chocolate poured in while mixing. It's yummy guys
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 15 May 2011, 16:54
I put eggs in cheesecakes sometimes! Gives it lightness! Also, the yolks are binders which helps too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Elizzybeth on 15 May 2011, 16:58
So I used to sneer at rice-cookers, but now I use one every single day... only occasionally to cook rice. It's a damned useful appliance for slowly and leisurely making stews and soups on long days full of studying and movies.

Other recent discoveries: sourdough bread is easy and good; yogurt is better strained than runny, and is an excellent ice-cream substitute. Made a sort of yogurt chocolate stracciatella ice cream the other day and it was delish. Some extra cream, sugar, honey, vanilla, white chocolate, dark chocolate poured in while mixing. It's yummy guys

Aimless, long time no see!

I have also recently discovered the pleasures of slow cooking.  I was gifted a Crock Pot about a month ago and have made chipotle chicken chili (twice), pot roast, vegetarian chili, and lamb curry.  Yum.  All the flavors mix and blend, and meat gets tender and melty, without the addition of a bunch of salt or fat.  Plus, you generally have leftovers for a few days.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 15 May 2011, 17:23
Lizzy! :D

Would love a slow cooker, but gonna hafta make do with a nice dutch oven and a great electrical oven in the mean time... I've upgraded to a real kitchen :D

The dutch oven is great. The missus roasted a nice big hunk of elk in it over several hours, and yeah it came out pretty tender and melty... for being game anyway :)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 15 May 2011, 17:25
Find some Russian garlic and put a whole lot of cloves of that in your slow cooking. They get all soft and mushy but hold their shape and when you eat them and they're delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 May 2011, 02:08
Oh man my slow cooker rice cooker porridge maker vegetable steamer monstrosity is the best thing I have ever bought! It makes perfect risotto, perfect rice, perfect porridge - I haven't steamed any vegetables in it yet but I am going to soon (maybe asparagus if I can get any) and also I want to try making mac & cheese in it. Everything cooks soft without burning and I don't have to keep stirring and stirring, or scrub the pan afterwards, it just gets on with it. Only downside is that it underestimates the amount of water I need but I know that now, so I just put an extra cup in and it's fine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 26 May 2011, 11:48
I don't think I've ever mentioned it here before (might have said something about it in Meebo), but I started a food blog a few months ago and this week I'm doing a series of posts for National Vegetarian Week with recipes for meals my family's eaten in the last couple of weeks.

I'm hardly the world's greatest blogger, or the world's greatest cook for that matter, but I'm proud of the progress I've made in both areas since starting the blog. Anyway if anyone wants to check it out and give me some feedback/recipe ideas, then it's here: Faint With Hunger (http://faintwithhunger.blogspot.com/).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Avec on 06 Jun 2011, 07:29
(http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff218/Anttom123/Dinner.jpg)
Salmon & bell pepper shish kabobs with a special glaze. I made my sauce with brown sugar, lemon juice, ground chillies, a pinch of curry, some soy sauce and fresh dill.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: imagist42 on 06 Jun 2011, 10:53
Looks kind of like what we grilled on Saturday, except with a lot more flavor and flair. Two lips enormously up.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 09 Jun 2011, 15:39
Dear cooking thread,

after years of mucking about I have finally perfected my mint chocolate cake:

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/251071_10150325384818916_509003915_9888830_2220279_n.jpg)

Transportation was a little rough on the decoration, but everything else came together just right this time. The strawberries and the white chocolate/lime cream were the missing pieces all along. Some cinnamon and cardamom in the cake itself were good additions. A bit of water in the oven made for a perfectly moist cake. I was giddy :D


Today we made the best carrot cake I've ever eaten, and I've eaten a lot of cake. The missus has an ancient family recipe. I provided frosting made from strained vanilla yogurt, some cream cheese, more vanilla, frosting sugar, lemon and lime juice, and some cinnamon powder sprinkled on top.

Cinnamon and cardamom should be in all cakes. goodnight
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 09 Jun 2011, 15:51
rcp plz
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 10 Jun 2011, 06:48
Ooooh I would love to have the carrot cake recipe please! I'm looking for a good carrot cake recipe.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 10 Jun 2011, 14:10
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/254219_10150331871553916_509003915_9951653_613881_n.jpg)

(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/255127_10150331871508916_509003915_9951652_5309528_n.jpg)

was playing around with the second pic, pardon the glowiness :) recipe forthcoming, just as soon as I can steal it...!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 16 Jun 2011, 08:49
I get a daily recipe email and click through to things that sound interesting, and today my eye was caught by an amazing-sounding chocolate coffee ice cream cake bonanaza. But have a look at the ingredients list:

    Cake:
    3   Krispy Kreme Glazed Chocolate Cake Doughnuts
    1 pint  good-quality coffee ice cream, softened
    1/3 cup  caramel ice-cream topping
    1/3 cup  toffee bits
    Glaze:
    1/2 cup  heavy whipping cream
    1 1/2 cups  (8 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips
    1/4 cup  caramel sauce



What is this I don't even THAT IS NOT A RECIPE THEY DO NOT SELL THOSE THINGS IN THIS COUNTRY TELL ME HOW TO MAKE THEM.
Bah. This daily recipe email has turned out to be a daily disappointment email.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 16 Jun 2011, 09:03
I can buy Krispy Creme Doughnuts at my nearest big Tesco's, and the other bits don't seem too hard.  But I wonder if you could imitate it by mixing up the donuts with a couple of carefully selected Ben & Jerry's icecreams.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 Jun 2011, 02:19
Hmm now I'm jealous that you can buy Krispy Creme doughnuts even though I don't actually want to just assemble processed items into a sort of cake shape, I want to make my own cake! Just disappointed that a site that claims to be a recipe site spends most of its time encouraging people to buy junk food and add it to more junk food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 17 Jun 2011, 02:37
The Internet is just one big fraud, really.

(Actually, I've had some decent recipes off it as well.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 19 Jun 2011, 16:03
I made a soup for Father's Day dinner/lunch! It was good, but I was all worried because the last time I tried to make soup for my family (three Easters ago) it was a bland mushy overcooked mess. I made it in the slow cooker because (1) we went to a winery tasting in the morning so I wasn't here to watch it, and (2) I don't have a cooking pot that big because it went missing last time we moved. Anyway, it was good and we were happy and I will probably do it again because it was easy!

I used:
1 1/2 cups dried mixed beans (from a bag labeled 15 Bean Soup)
2 potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 quarts water

Left it to cook for about 3 hours, then added:
1 16oz. can diced tomatoes with green chilis
salt, dried oregano, basil, and thyme/rosemary/basil/marjoram/etc "Italian Seasoning"
1 onion, sauteed with garlic
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Slick on 08 Jul 2011, 21:18
Steak! Hullo!
Grilled steak with barbecue sauce and 'Argentinian' grilling sauce (see the fatty bit on the side? That is why you want your barbecue nice and hot, to make that stuff crisp and delicious), bacon sacchetini tossed with butter, fresh parmesean, and pepper (would have been nice to have had my homemade gnocchi in the freezer but eh, this shit has bacon in it!), and salad of lettuce, (edit: candied mother-fucking) pecans, and aged cheddar, dressed with white balsamic dressing with a drop of hot sauce.
(http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/5715/dscf5407f.jpg)

also I guess I am dealing with the bottom of a bottle of wine that's been open a few days.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 09 Jul 2011, 04:50
Ok so yesterday I got an egg salad sandwich at a little Korean deli after our gig, and they put bacon on it. Is that a thing?? I can deal with getting my salad-no-chicken-please, but I did not know I might be in danger of getting bacon and American cheese on egg salad.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 09 Jul 2011, 12:43
I conducted a covert raid on my girlfriend's garden/jungle and came back with a buttload of herbs and tomatoes and roman spinach.

Lunch: chicken fillet filled with home-made pesto, served with quinoa (tastes hella better if you fry it up lightly after cooking) and stewed roman spinach+seaweed+mushrooms.

Dinner: roasted beef tenderloin, just on the medium side of rare, served with lightly fried spring veggies and itsy bitsy potatoes and our first attempt at compound butter (basil, thyme, chives, rosemary, horseradish, garlic, lemon juice, balsamico).

I have never made beef tenderloin before :D turns out this thermometer thing that I'd scorned in the past is a very useful tool after all. I cried a little :') warmly recommended. The butter was very good too, and I'm glad I decided to add the balsamico, think it made the whole thing so much better.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 Jul 2011, 15:12
Flapjacks!

(http://cassland.org/images/Flapjack.JPG)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Tom on 09 Jul 2011, 15:22
So that's what you silly Great Britons call a muesli bar.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 Jul 2011, 16:13
That's just butter*, oats, and honey - nothing else.  It's gooier than I'd expect a muesli bar to be, and has no fruit or nuts; it's possible to add a little fruit or nuts without losing the flapjack nature of it, but it's not usual.

* as we call the soya margarine I now use instead.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 10 Jul 2011, 04:58
Tom, flapjacks are so much more wonderful than a mere muesli bar.

I found a pretty decent episode for "British" flapjacks online and made them a little while, in tribute to my English grandfather who loved them.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 10 Jul 2011, 06:51
"episode"?  That is so completely the wrong word it's not even a malapropism...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 10 Jul 2011, 10:29
I'd say flapjacks are totally different to muesli, as I don't tend to put nuts or raisins in my flapjacks as they go super hard in the oven. When does it stop being muesli and become granola?

I love flapjacks. At college we used to have a "baked goods" Monday and on my turn I'd usually bring flapjacks - they go down a storm. 

As for replacing Krispy Kremes - can you not just get regular doughnuts and glaze them with stuff? or ice them?

My grandparents came back from Canada with some interesting stuff - an "Oh Henry" bar which looks like death in chocolate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 10 Jul 2011, 10:40
In the 1950s my Canadian aunt used to send us poor Brits a Christmas parcel, and it always contained Oh Henry bars.  I can't remember what we thought of them, but as I remember sweet rationing (the last rationing to end) in the first part of the 50s, I'm know they were welcome anyway!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 10 Jul 2011, 13:52
Lupercal, if you're referring to my post then yes, that would be possible, but I don't actually like doughnuts all that much. I was hoping the recipe would be more like "300g flour, a pinch of salt, 100g butter" or whatever, rather than "Krispy Kreme doughnuts".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 10 Jul 2011, 14:31
In the 1950s my Canadian aunt used to send us poor Brits a Christmas parcel, and it always contained Oh Henry bars.  I can't remember what we thought of them, but as I remember sweet rationing (the last rationing to end) in the first part of the 50s, I'm know they were welcome anyway!

Its fucking crazy that people had to ration shit. Well, it isn't, but I think as my generation is the first generation in a long time that hasn't had to say "no" or go without stuff, it explains a lot really. Wars really sorted you out, what what.


Barrymoo -

Yeah, they seemed to have gone rather the Epic Meal Time way of recipe ideas.

Doughnuts are nice, but Krispy Kremes are trans-fat-tastic. And generally disappointing to me, when I'd rather just have a sugared one filled with jam.

 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 10 Jul 2011, 14:32
I'm also very much enjoying your blog - and as a Uni student/Sainsbury's employee I think quite a lot of it makes sense/is useful/communicates with me on a higher level.

My girlfriend has similar lunchboxes - they have animals on them, I think. Still very cutesy though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Inlander on 10 Jul 2011, 21:08
"episode"?  That is so completely the wrong word it's not even a malapropism...

Looks like it's off to the brain-scan machine with me!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 11 Jul 2011, 01:29
I didn't realise anyone was reading it! That is a boost :) Perhaps I should update it more.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: BlakeJustBlake on 11 Jul 2011, 03:56
Oh, hey, I have a cooking blog:

http://stonedstove.tumblr.com
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: redglasscurls on 13 Jul 2011, 07:13
Man you guys a flapjack is a friggn pancake, not whatever that granola/candy bar contraption is.


Oh and wikipedia totally backs me up for once, it has only referred to an oat bar since 1935 but it's been a pancake since the 17th century
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 13 Jul 2011, 07:47
And your pancakes aren't quite like ours either...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Boro_Bandito on 13 Jul 2011, 09:13
Yeah I looked em up and they just looked like crepes to me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 21 Aug 2011, 14:04
Have had some serious kitchen abstinence while away working this summer, so I've kept myself busy this weekend now that work is over and I have lots of time. Highlights: salmon korma[ybe]; a kind of chicken biryani flavoured with maple syrup; squash-leaf dolma--some fried and some steamed--stuffed with a semi-spicy blend of shrimp and veggies, blessed by the almighty mustard-seed oil. I, too, am stuffed. It's nice to cook and eat properly again <3 I've never actually done anything with squash leaves before, filched them from my mum's balcony and boy were they WEIRD. Weird but delicious. Would probably have been easier to make the dolma if I'd steamed the leaves a little beforehand.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 02 Sep 2011, 10:51
And your pancakes aren't quite like ours either...

To be fair the breakfast pancakes I had in New York covered in butter, syrup and banana are probably better than anything I've had on Shrove Tuesday...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 02 Sep 2011, 12:43
They're different - and they're both great.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: valley_parade on 02 Sep 2011, 13:30
In the 1950s my Canadian aunt used to send us poor Brits a Christmas parcel, and it always contained Oh Henry bars.  I can't remember what we thought of them, but as I remember sweet rationing (the last rationing to end) in the first part of the 50s, I'm know they were welcome anyway!

This is a long reach for a quote, but I have an hour to kill before I can leave work.

Canadian-American pop-culture history: In the 1990s, there was a Major League outfielder named Henry Rodriguez that played for both the Chicago Cubs and Montreal Expos. When he'd hit a home run, fans would throw Oh Henry bars onto the field in celebration.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 05 Oct 2011, 03:33
Hello, Cooking Thread. I have a question for you, which is slightly less related to cooking than to food in general: What do you with coconut?

I'm asking because I've always enjoyed cracking open coconuts - there's a certain primal satisfaction to it - but I never really knew what to do with the contents afterwards. You could eat it straight out of the shell, and it has a texture like really hard apples and a slightly muted taste. Surprisingly (to me) the coconut 'milk' inside is actually a clear and colourless liquid.

Then I happened to see how people prepared coconut in the places they actually grow (on tv that is, I'm not that well-travelled), which is to mash the contents up into a sort of porridge. I tried to emulate the result in a shamefully privileged manner: By throwing it in a blender. To make it mix I added milk and some sugar for taste, emptied the resulting mix in a kitchen sieve to let the milk run out, and what's left is tasty, chewy ground-up coconut. It tastes great on bread or toast, and blending a whole coconut gives you enough to spread on a couple dozen slices. That makes it much cheaper than buying coconut bread pre-packaged.

I also tried mixing it through a salad, but the stuff I made was slightly too sweet for that. Any ideas as to what else I can make with it?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Jam on 05 Oct 2011, 09:32
I'd say make some macaroons! Delicious and nutr- ... Well they taste good at least.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 09 Oct 2011, 08:48
I'd probably not have known what you were talking about if the Dutch word for macaroons didn't sound exactly the same. I wonder who borrowed it from whom?

Those things look easy to make, so I might give 'em a try. I better axe another coconut!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 11 Oct 2011, 08:50
I made fajitas and chili-cornbread the other day, it was wonderful. Love mexican food but the cornbread was something that I've never done before and was surprisingly cake-like in it's consistency, but was still nice because of all the chillis I shoved in there. A great side to any mexican meal.

And now, because Sainsbury's stopped selling them, I will attempt to make my girlfriend's favourite breakfast food: strawberry pop tarts.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 23 Oct 2011, 05:50
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAekQ5fzfGM

Most useful thing I've learned this weekend. It's fast, easy, fun, and very practical. Cooks quicker. Looks cute. The carcass and scraps makes for good chicken soup. If you roast it in the oven you can make gravy from the drippings. I filled it with spinach, dried wild mushrooms, feta cheese, a kind of celery, onion, garlic and herbs.

Give it a shot!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 23 Oct 2011, 06:10
Guys, I made an awesome apple-walnut coffee cake. It as awesome taste and texture (sweet and a bit cornbreadish). "Tis delicious
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 23 Nov 2011, 05:49
I made rose rolls again.  I've done them fo every birthday and anniversary breakfast since I first foud them in some magazine in a doctor's office.  Simple, really simple...

Ingrediants; one tube of crescent rolls (I use Pillsbury out of laziness)
Brown Sugar (about 2 Tbs)
Cinnamon (<1tsp)
Butter (~2 Tbsp) soft enough to spread (this time of year, that's an issue, even for the stick we leave out for toast...)
Chopped pecans.  Walnuts can work, too, but we like pecans.  You'll need to chop them more yourself...

Preheat the oven to 350.  The roll package says 375, but that usually scorches the nuts (insert obligatory joke here). 

You'll also need a full size muffin tin.  Foil cups won't do the trick. 

Roll out the dough, do not separate the triangles.  Spred them with a fairly thin layer of butter, than mix the cinnamon and brown sugar and spread it on. 

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7174/6388938759_c2f9de5cbd_m.jpg)

Chop the nuts much more finely than normal.  they should be about two steps away from nut dust...

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7026/6388939209_447dd46313_m.jpg)

Spread them out on the dough, then separate the triangles.  It's hard to see the seams, a knife helps  :wink:

Roll them the wrong way.  From the sharpest point, along the long edge. 

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7026/6388939697_cbe2bd99d2_m.jpg)

Pick it up and pinch the bottom closed so the good stuff doesn't leak out and stick to the pan.  Stand the rosebud in the muffin tin. 

(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6050/6388940113_73705da50f_m.jpg)

There are eight in a tube, although they make half-tubes so you can do a dozen...

When you stand them in the tin, lean them against one side, the large pointed petal needs support. 

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7168/6388941093_b71657ea1c_m.jpg)

Oven time?  Beats me.  I start with about 15 minutes, but I think my oven runs a bit cool.  Try 10 - 12 minutes to start, and just watch them for the last few minutes.  Go for golden brown and crispy looking...

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7004/6388941635_45eaca0f18_m.jpg)

Plated.  Cute, no?  Crispy, soft inside, sweet, delicious, best warm and they stay warm for a while. 

(http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6221/6388942059_49eed1f7a9_m.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: usmcnavgeek on 26 Nov 2011, 20:38
What I Did Instead Of Sleeping One Night
A Photo Essay Slash Effortpost By usmcnavgeek

I have posted this on my other online hangouts because I am proud of it so now I will share it/force it on you all.  I made eggnog.  I made eggnog instead of sleeping because I hate myself on a subconscious level and want to punish myself by staying up all night when I really have to work on a paper.  But that's not the point. 

I made eggnog.  I will show you how I did it.

First you need to get all your stuff together.  The French call this mise-en-place.  Maybe they don't use the hyphens, you'd have to ask them, I only took 3 semesters and I forgot it all already.  But you need to get all your shit together.  This makes life easier.
(http://i.imgur.com/YK5O2.jpg)


Next you need to separate your eggs.  If you have one of those egg separators you can use that, or if you're pr0 like me you can just use the shell halves to do it.  Make sure that under no circumstances you get any yolk in the white.  White in the yolk is okay though.
(http://i.imgur.com/Akpf2.jpg)


Look I did all twelve and didn't fuck up horribly.
(http://i.imgur.com/OnO82.jpg)



Okay yolks go into my beast of a stand mixer and get beaten up.
(http://i.imgur.com/Yxudf.jpg)



Then you add all the sugar.  Keep mixing.
(http://i.imgur.com/dbreY.jpg)



While it's mixing pour out 2 cups of that bourbon.
(http://i.imgur.com/e73cT.jpg)



Add it in and mix it.  This is where you take your first break and let it sit for an hour.
(http://i.imgur.com/di8LI.jpg)



I had a pizza in the oven so while I waited I ate pizza.
(http://i.imgur.com/aP4mp.jpg)



Okay hey we're back, now measure out a couple more cups of bourbon.
(http://i.imgur.com/3zi05.jpg)



Pour that shit in.
(http://i.imgur.com/5r1UK.jpg)



I did the last two cups as brandy.  The OP used rum.
(http://i.imgur.com/8KTSq.jpg)



Whatever, pour that shit in too. 
(http://i.imgur.com/jtEjw.jpg)



Now add all the heavy cream.  Mmm.  Realize that hey, man, your mixing bowl is getting kinda full.
(http://i.imgur.com/zy1J8.jpg)



Stir that crap together.  This is where you take your second break and let it sit in the fridge for 3 hours.
(http://i.imgur.com/ibkO0.jpg)



Okay hey we're back thanks to the magic of the internet.  Beat the shit out of those egg whites!
(http://i.imgur.com/LMEjT.jpg)



Beat them until they look like this I guess.
(http://i.imgur.com/es9P3.jpg)



Okay, add them on top and fold it all together, thanking god that it all just barely fits in the bowl.
(http://i.imgur.com/YygEl.jpg)



Now perch your expensive camera on top of your fridge in a precarious manner and take a picture of you grating the nutmeg into the stuff.  Freak the fuck out and barely catch the camera when it falls off.  Resume grating.
(http://i.imgur.com/7UHIa.jpg)




Commence operation eggnog storage.  Realize you fucked up and need more eggnog storage.  Whatever, put it in the pitcher and cover it with plastic wrap.
(http://i.imgur.com/CkD94.jpg)




Appropriately label your storage container.  You are done.
(http://i.imgur.com/nr4X0.jpg)




This stuff is pretty boozy with 6 cups of liquor in it, but it tastes good.  It's actually reasonably light, the egg whites being beaten really adds some air and fluffiness to the stuff which is great because if my calculations are correct this entire recipe contains 11,088 calories or 462 calories per 1-cup serving.

Fuck yeah, holidays.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 27 Nov 2011, 12:16
Oh, I guess I can make a half-assed follow-up post about those macaroons I made at home a few weeks ago. It required seperating eggs as well, and I used the half-shells to do it. Only problem was, the eggs weren't completely fresh, so in about half of them the yolk was no longer intact, so it took three tries before I finally got a good bowl of eggwhite. If you ever seperate eggs, get them fresh!

Then it was just a matter of stirring the rest of the ingredients through the beaten eggwhite. They would have turned out better if I had the foresight of not dunking the whole grated coconut in the bowl at once. That made stirring it a lot harder, and the eggwhite was a bit unevenly distributed across the macaroons. When they got out of the oven, one had too much eggwhite and was leaking, and two others had crumbled a bit. But at least they were tasty!

I might try this again once I get an oven in this garbage dump we call a communal kitchen. I just have to find something with which to crack a coconut. I don't think I can count on anyone here having an axe at hand.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 27 Nov 2011, 12:55
Hammers work, too. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 28 Nov 2011, 04:27
usmcnavgeek, I think you have made my most favourite forum post ever.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 10 Jan 2012, 13:26
Baked an omelette with salmon and chives for dinner. Could use more vegetables, but it was good eating, even though I've never made an omelette before.

Before Christmas I stopped by the local pet food store and found they sell live mealworms. Like I said in the vegetarian thread, I'm looking into taking up insect eating as an alternative protein source. I'll also need to check whether or not they're actually cheaper, gram-for-gram, than traditional meat. But I also need some recipes, of course. Maybe I can bake mealworms into an omelette as well? Iowa State University (http://www.ent.iastate.edu/misc/insectsasfood.html) has some, I may try one out tomorrow. Oh, a Chinese supplier (http://www.hcmealworm.com/mealworms_recipe.php) as well, at least these have their ingredients in metric.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 10 Jan 2012, 23:44
I hear most larva do well fried, but I don't know if that's deep-fried or more like sauteed in butter...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 11 Jan 2012, 11:49
Well, as a low-cost alternative to meat, mealworms are out the window. The pet food store sells them in portions of 50 grams for €1.25. That makes the price per kilo €25, which is three times the price of organic ground beef. The 200g I needed cost me €5, but I figured I had to at least try it.

First I threw the mealworms in a sieve to get rid of the sandy gunk they keep them in. They kept trying to crawl out of the sieve, on account of being alive, the buggers. First I sauteed some onion and hot pepper in the pan, then dunked the worms in. Fortunately, once you throw them in the pan, they stop writhing rather quickly. Once they get really hot, their insides get cooked, and their little exoskeletons start to fizz and pop. I wasn't sure how long to fry them, because the recipe didn't specify how to prepare them live versus freeze-dried, so I probably fried them a bit too long to make sure they were thoroughly killed. Then I emptied a bag of chopped vegetables in the pan and left those to fry as well, and poured in a bit of oyster sauce. Served with white rice.

The resulting mix was quite eatable, but like I said, the mealworms were in a bit too long, so most of them were reduced to a chewy husk. Maybe that's what's supposed to happen to them, but they didn't really taste like anything. Although my mind wasn't entirely on the food; I wiped my nose before, and my hands were still full of capsaicin. My membranes, they burrrrn! And as I was typing this I did it again on my lower lip, god damn it! I even washed my hands in between! Aaaaargh!

Anyway, I don't see myself buying these more often. Even if I can cook them properly they're just too damn expensive. I looked up some other pet food stores online, and some of them charge two to three times as much for mealworms as the store I went to, and those are not even alive! The only prices that approach reason are the ones that the Chinese exporter charges, which is $8 per kilo for freeze-dried worms, but then you have to deal with $21 shipping costs. Nope, I'll stick to eating plain ol' vertebrates.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 11 Jan 2012, 12:05
ohdearohdear for some reason the description of you frying them really bothered me. I don't think it is because they are insects, I think it's just because they were dying. I have a very odd and probably irrational feeling about death, I can't even bear to squash flies. I get upset when an insect drowns itself in a pool of water.

Anyhow, I am cooking mushroom and asparagus risotto in my rice cooker in my room! This is totally against the rules. We were specifically banned from bringing rice cookers. I did so anyway because I AM A MASSIVE REBEL. I keep it under my beanbag, which is probably also banned as a fire risk but I keep the beanbag behind my desk and there have been no spontaneous fires thus far.

It smells incredible, even though all that is in it is risotto rice, sliced mushrooms, asparagus pieces and water. I have a friend coming for dinner tomorrow who is allergic to a bunch of stuff, and another person coming who is apparently a fussy eater (not met her before) so I am hoping that I will have a range of meal options they can choose from - one of which will be leftover risotto if I manage not to eat it all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 11 Jan 2012, 12:17
Well, if it makes any difference, it bothered me a bit too. Even though I'm pretty sure insects are not capable of suffering as higher animals are, it can't have been pleasant. But at least now I can truthfully say that I killed my own food once. :P

Hey, look at that, the Chinese mealworm supplier even has a (poorly translated) guide available on how to breed your own mealworms. And it says you need to kill your mealworms by putting them in the freezer for 48 hours before cooking and eating them. Well, I didn't have that option anyway - no freezer - but I do wonder which is worse: freezing to death or being fried alive?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 11 Jan 2012, 17:48
Well, if it makes any difference, it bothered me a bit too. Even though I'm pretty sure insects are not capable of suffering as higher animals are, it can't have been pleasant. But at least now I can truthfully say that I killed my own food once. :P

Hey, look at that, the Chinese mealworm supplier even has a (poorly translated) guide available on how to breed your own mealworms. And it says you need to kill your mealworms by putting them in the freezer for 48 hours before cooking and eating them. Well, I didn't have that option anyway - no freezer - but I do wonder which is worse: freezing to death or being fried alive?


I found your bug adventures to be strangely enjoyable. I can't imagine it myself but I'm sure it's mostly because I can't even bring myself to eat anything that has a shell/crunchy exterior (especially if it's still inside it). Or eyes. Yeah...I'm one of those people that can't eat something if it looks the same way it did when it was alive. But that was a really interesting read. Thank you for allowing me to live vicariously through you during your experience. I can't believe how expensive they are!!


Hello, Cooking Thread. I have a question for you, which is slightly less related to cooking than to food in general: What do you with coconut?

Oh, and I'm a little late on this, but you could make sweet coconut rice with mango slices (yummmm) or piña coladas....even more yum. there are a lot of Thai recipes that use coconut and are absolutely amazing. Coconut soup, coconut curry...om nom nom.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 11 Jan 2012, 19:35
Coconut curry is fantastic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 11 Jan 2012, 23:40
I like to make french toast out of things. I soak them in egg and a little vanilla and I fry them. I've made french toast out of most kinds of bread, bagels, pop tarts, flour tortillas, dish sponge (didn't eat that one. Just had to see if I could), brownies, cakes. Once I pounded out some stew beef and stabbed a million little holes in it with a fork. That was good. You can make french toast out of damn near anything.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: DrPhibes on 18 Jan 2012, 02:27
This week, with 3,92 euros on my bank account, 4 soupdinners (80 cents - 1 euro) left and 6 freezed hamburgers (25 cents per burger) I will manage this week! I only have to buy some bread and I'm set!
I could do this all month actually... never noticed how much i spend on food untill im poor like this  :psyduck:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 18 Jan 2012, 03:36
I'm not sure if this really applies to all the people making nice food but my boyfriend was describing something he cooked to me, which included boiled pasta, a can of tomato soup, chopped ham or bacon and cheese which he then puts under the grill.

It took me a while but I realised he was describing an easy pastabake. Which he grills. I asked him why he thought it was called pastabake and he said he just never questioned it. Then he asked his mum why she always let him grill it to which her response was, "... You grill it?" :psyduck:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 19 Jan 2012, 13:17
Whenever we do a pastabake, we bake it till it's almost done, then cover it with mozzarella and... put it "under the grill" (I think that's what we in the US call a broiler) until the cheese browns.  It won't do that if you just bake it! 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: DrPhibes on 19 Jan 2012, 14:11
Ima sustain myself with the following untill wednesday: 3 loafs of bread. 6 burgers, 2 cans of soup! And some breakfast stuff.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 19 Jan 2012, 14:36
Toast the bread and dip it in the soup! It makes the soup last longer and the bread tastier. For awhile I was living on toast and broth.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 19 Jan 2012, 14:57
until the cheese browns.  It won't do that if you just bake it! 

It will if you bake it hot enough - which is fine for some things, but perhaps not for a pasta bake!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 19 Jan 2012, 16:14
Yeah, by the time the cheese browns on high heat (400 or so) the pasta around the edges get burnt. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 19 Jan 2012, 16:24
Yeah, I'd put it under the grill to let the cheese brown a bit too but cooking it entirely under the grill?

We're gonna cook our own versions for each other if we ever find the time to do it. I'm still baffled why he never questioned it having "bake" in the title.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: DrPhibes on 23 Jan 2012, 09:11
IVE GOT MONEY AGAIN!

I bought myself a pizza to celebrate that fact :D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 23 Jan 2012, 09:23
congratulations on the pizza, sir.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 23 Jan 2012, 12:14
While pizza is being talked about, my tiny town just got a Pizza Hut last month. The town's gone kind of crazy with it but there's enough hipsters to keep the local ones going out of pride over actually liking the pizza better.

To keep this relevant to cooking: Home made pizza is the best. Although I've never quite gotten the base right. It usually ends up quite crumbly or soggy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 23 Jan 2012, 12:21
Oof. Pizza Hut pizza wreaks havoc on my stomach....I used to love it and eat it anyway but it's just not worth it to me anymore.

And i agree- homemade pizza is awesome. I've only made my own crust once before and it didn't come out quite right but I've found that the frozen dough I can buy at the grocery store works pretty well. I've finally managed to make my pizza a normal looking circular shape rather than the amorphous blob I used to end up with. If you can stuff the crust with mozzarella it's even better  :-)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 23 Jan 2012, 12:55
Do you partially cook the crust before adding sauce, cheese and toppings?  It works pretty well. 

Most home ovens don't approach the temperature of a professional pizza oven, hence the soggy crust. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 23 Jan 2012, 13:07
I've finally managed to make my pizza a normal looking circular shape rather than the amorphous blob I used to end up with.

The blob shape has never bothered me. It means we can make more!

Do you partially cook the crust before adding sauce, cheese and toppings?  It works pretty well. 

Most home ovens don't approach the temperature of a professional pizza oven, hence the soggy crust. 

We've always cooked the crust and toppings at the same time. Will try partially cooking it next time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: DrPhibes on 24 Jan 2012, 00:29
I just buy pre-made pizza shapes and put stuff on them myself.
My stomach wasn't happy at all getting pizza yesterday and decided to let it go through the digestive system asap... :psyduck:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 24 Jan 2012, 07:29
Oooh, I've never cooked the crust first....how long do you usually leave it in for?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 28 Jan 2012, 11:36
Today I decided to make a more elaborate meal than usual. It was chicken breast, cut into diagonal slices (but not all the way through or else it falls apart) with slices of lemon in between, plus potatoes in the skin, carrots and green beans (cooked beforehand) on the side, garnished with garlic, rosemary, basil, parsley, salt and pepper. The entire shebang is then wrapped in aluminum foil and left to steam in the oven for 20 minutes on 220°C.

The recipe said to sprinkle with white wine or applejuice. I went with applejuice, may have poured over a bit too much, because the result was slightly too sour, but altogether good to eat. I made a second packet to cook tomorrow. Also got a minor cut on my finger from a serrated knife when trying to cut the smallest remaining bit of the lemon for one more slice. But lemons are just damn impossible to cut using smooth-edged knives, you just end up squeezing them out before the knife gets through the skin.

Also, I got the vegetables at the local greengrocer instead of at the supermarket. Though I'm not entirely sure if it makes a difference in price, or quality. The supermarket's oranges were fucking terrible though; it's easy to win in that regard.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 29 Jan 2012, 12:50
Oooh, I've never cooked the crust first....how long do you usually leave it in for?

About 4 - 5 minutes at the recommended temperature (425 or so?).  It allows a lot of the crust's moisture to escape, and the bottom crisps nicely. 

Also got a minor cut on my finger from a serrated knife when trying to cut the smallest remaining bit of the lemon for one more slice. But lemons are just damn impossible to cut using smooth-edged knives, you just end up squeezing them out before the knife gets through the skin.

You need a sharper knife... my father taught me proper knife sharpening/honing technique, and with a properly sharpened knife, you can slice a ripe tomatoe paper thin without squeezing the seeds out.  Lemons are no problem...

And that packet chicken sounds fantastic! 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 07 Feb 2012, 16:05
Does anybody here have experience brining pork? I have a recipe from Alton Brown and I've never done this before.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 08 Feb 2012, 04:11
So my plan for next year is to get my hands on my dad's chili recipe and bribe the people on my dorm floor for things like rides.
Chili is so good when made right. And very nutritious too with it essentially being meat and veggies with maybe some pasta if yu are feeling raunchy
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 08 Feb 2012, 05:05
I made chili yesterday. It's a good meal for when you don't feel like doing more work than cutting stuff up and throwing it in a pan.

I use one onion, one bell pepper, half of a small tin of corn, a small tin of kidney beans, a medium-sized tin of baked beans in sauce, bacon cubes, and chili sauce, garnished with grated cheese. My dad also adds mushrooms, and generally makes about five times as much chili as I do. But it's good eat'n.

Any other tricks or ingredients you use?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 08 Feb 2012, 07:32
D- I've been looking into brining lately. I haven't done it yet but it's on the to-do list. I have a chicken I want to roast and I think I'm going to brine that this weekend. My biggest issue is fridge space, but I'm taking this week off from grocery shopping so I think I can squeeze the little bugger in there. This is pretty helpful- Brining Basics from Cook's Illustrated (http://www.cooksillustrated.com/images/document/howto/ND01_ISBriningbasics.pdf)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 08 Feb 2012, 12:38
My chili is far less extravagant, just meat, tomatoes in various forms, and onions.

I did make white chili once, but it wasn't so good. To describe it broadly, it was  like a combination between curry and chicken noodles. I would rather have curry.

Also, I have noticed that a lot of people put corn n tex/mex stuff. I never really tried except with taco salad. I am a purist when it comes to stews like chili.


Also, to go into a completely random topic, what do you all think of white chocolate? I have gotten mostly meh or unfavorable responses.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 08 Feb 2012, 12:50
I assume you mean white chocolate for eating, not cooking...

I've had white chocolate with puffed rice, and one variant with coconut. 'twas alright. Thing is, white chocolate has an overpowering sweet taste that you don't get in milk and dark chocolate, and I haven't been able to appreciate extremely sweet things since I was a kid. I notice that I'd eat as much sweet stuff as I could get my hands on when I was young. But now I don't enjoy that stuff nearly as much.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 08 Feb 2012, 13:23
I find white chocolate a better compliment for things like pretzaels and raisins and nuts. Other chocolate tends to be a bit overpowering.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 08 Feb 2012, 13:27
I LOVE white chocolate. I can't eat too much of it or it'll make me feel sick, but in small doses it's heavenly. I love the white chocolate truffles from Lindt....mmm...

It's funny because I don't particularly enjoy milk or dark chocolate. I like some chocolate flavored things, but usually it has to have something mixed into it like peanut butter, almonds or coconut. I really don't get much out of plain old Hershey's bars or even chocolate cake (although brownies are another story entirely). In general I'd rather something chewy/fruity. Give me a bag of Swedish Fish and they'll be gone in a matter of seconds.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 08 Feb 2012, 14:40
I would suggest you try Belgian chocolate (real chocolate from actual Belgium, not just chocolate labelled Belgian). I've heard Hershey's bars are basically made of carboard and food colouring. If you have tried real Swiss or Belgian chocolate and still don't like it then I am sorry for you :(
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 08 Feb 2012, 15:13
I really do not enjoy white chocolate... I don't really know why, it just coats my mouth with this weird feeling.

My chili recipe involves potatoes, onion, carrot, chick peas, lentils, and V8 juice for the tomato-ness.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Sorflakne on 08 Feb 2012, 15:47
Think I'll be having chicken breast, corn and rice tonight.  If I had collard greens, I'd have a few leaves of that too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 08 Feb 2012, 16:45
I've bought my brine stuff and will hopefully be able to do that tomorrow. I'll let you fine folks know how that turns out.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Dollface on 19 Feb 2012, 04:46
(http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh191/Wondersaunahotpants/SAM_0289.jpg)

get drunk, make food happen.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 19 Feb 2012, 05:04
...and see it again in a couple hours. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: DrPhibes on 19 Feb 2012, 08:02
Looks like something I'd make Dollface!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 26 Feb 2012, 09:01
I made some foods! (http://faintwithhunger.blogspot.com/)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 26 Feb 2012, 10:47
I cooked lasagne for the first time ever pretty much by myself. Didn't think to take pictures but I made it for my boyfriend's family and they loved it. Also made pancakes because the boyfriend didn't get any on Pancake/Shrove Tuesday.

I want to try baking cookies for the first time this week.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 26 Feb 2012, 11:13
Cookies are really easy. Just follow the directions on the back of the bag of chocolate chips.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 26 Feb 2012, 12:16
That rather assumes the bag of chocolate chips has a recipe for cookies on it.

I got annoyed at the recipe for the quiche - it said "two packets of pastry". Right. And what size would the packets be? I bought two packets of ready-roll pastry in the size it is sold in in this country, and one was ample. Silly American recipes and their inabiliity to use actual quantities in their recipes (what is a cup? (I know what a cup is thanks to conversion sites but why can't you use grams?)).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 26 Feb 2012, 13:00
A cup is a measuring cup! How are you supposed to get anything done if you have to weigh everything? :psyduck: It's bad enough when they call for things in ounces, when it's not really just telling you what size jar to buy. What does 3 ounces of shredded cheese look like? I have no idea, it's coming out of a 1-pound bag!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 26 Feb 2012, 15:04
But I don't have a measuring cup, and I do have weighing scales! Plus I can estimate 100g of things like flour and sugar, I have no idea what a cup looks like! Or indeed an ounce.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 26 Feb 2012, 16:16
My Mammy is one of those people who can estimate everything for weight. That's what cooking from scratch for forty years does for you.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 27 Feb 2012, 09:45
My wife's one of those cooks who doesn't measure a damn thing. 


It can be really annoying, not just because she can't tell friends her recipes.  See, she can estimate fine for whatever she's making, but she can't tell if we have enough of something and will always  buy more...  so we have extra jars and cans and bags of everything, and when she gets inspired at the grocery, she can't recall if we have any at all, so she buys more...

Last summer, I told her "don't buy any more BBQ sauce until I tell you".  We still  have plenty for this coming summer... and we eat quite a bit of barbecue! 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 29 Feb 2012, 14:45
Anyone have any good recipes/advice for making banana bread?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 28 Apr 2012, 16:01
Whoever invented brownies should get a goddamn medal. That is all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 03 May 2012, 03:43
I just made some kickass scrambled eggs. Thugh, I shoulld have put more cheese into it, I didn't notice it at all.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 03 May 2012, 04:10
For breakfast yesterday, my housemate cooked up some scrambled eggs with black pudding mushed into them. Let me tell you, it is one of the best things I've ever had for breakfast.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 03 May 2012, 14:28
Just looked black pudding up- it sounds interesting. Though I wonder what ittastes like with all the add ins and blood in it. I assume it has blood in it, since it is also called a blood sausage.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 03 May 2012, 14:33
It is pretty much just a sausage made out of blood clot.* It is absolutely fucking delicious. I can't think how to describe it to the uninitiated. I guess it tastes like a really rich sausage? Very salty.

*My knowledge of how they are made is not necessarily completely accurate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 03 May 2012, 14:39
It's really good stuff, but maybe an acquired taste (but then, isn't anything? - we just acquire most tastes in childhood).  The best comes from Bury market - and I have a friend who lives in the outskirts of Bury :-)   Of course, there's also a Bavarian blood sausage (Blutwurst).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 03 May 2012, 14:43
Yeah the saltiness is why I don't think I would like it. I really dislike th salty taste, Also the knowledge that I am eating blood. Now I know that meat is just as bad, but it's easier to remove myself from that thought when I am eating just regular meat. I don't think I can do that with blood
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 03 May 2012, 14:48
Gravy is blood sauce.  Also, I wouldn't say that all black pudding is violently salty - I'm happy with it, and as a preference I use no salt at all either in cooking or as a condiment.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 03 May 2012, 14:51
Baked a ham-and-cheese omelette for dinner. I think three eggs is one too many for one serving, because the topside stays slightly too runny when the bottom starts to brown, and I couldn't eat all of it, but it was still palatable. It's the quickest and easiest dinner I know how to make; beat a few eggs with a generous heap of grated cheese, pour it in a pan and lay a few slices of ham on top once it's a bit solid. Sometimes I do the same with slices of smoked salmon.

Scrambled eggs I don't really like, and poached eggs I need to try sometime. I fry eggs over hard and boil them hard. Tell me, what else is there to do with eggs?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 03 May 2012, 15:04
Soak bread in beaten egg and fry it (French toast).
Mix up eggs with crumbled bread (including crust) and fry the mixture in bacon fat; eat with the bacon (eggy bread).
Soufflés of various sorts.
Learn to like omelettes that still have part of the egg runny; it's their essence - to make an omelette, start frying in a little hot fat, then as soon as a layer forms (i.e. immediately), push it together into a wrinkled heap and tilt the pan to let more runny egg onto the pan, repeating continuously until there is a mass of cooked layers glistening with runny egg but no more running out (no more than a minute or so); flip over at the end for a few seconds to brown the top (did I mention that the pan must be really quite hot to do this).  Adding cheese or tomatoes makes it much harder to do right, but finely chopped ham, mushroom, or herbs are fine.  Eat quickly before the moist but not runny layers harden.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 03 May 2012, 15:12
I've never heard that referred to as eggy bread before? Eggy bread in my experience is just a colloquial term for French Toast.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 03 May 2012, 15:16
Hard boiled eggs
There are some other less popular ways to cook eggs, but I have not tried them.
Now you can make more complicated stuff with eggs, which really aren't plain eggs anymore. Like egg custard, egg sandwiches, pickled egg, sometimes their even eaten raw in Japan with rice.

There's also this, if you're feeling kinky:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_boy_egg
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 03 May 2012, 15:18
I've never heard that referred to as eggy bread before? Eggy bread in my experience is just a colloquial term for French Toast.

The terms are not well defined - I distinguish as described; the results are quite distinct, so I find it useful to be clear in my mind.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 03 May 2012, 15:37
To the whole "egg recipes" thing, just plain old hard boiled egg with mayo is a delicious accompaniment to any cold meal.

I'd never even heard of what you refer to as eggy bread before. However, it sounds exceedingly delicious, and I will definitely try it when I get the chance.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 03 May 2012, 17:28
Re: eggy bread. I would think of Challah. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 03 May 2012, 17:52
Gravy is blood sauce. 

:-o I've never thought of it that way! Hmmmm....



My favorite things to do with eggs are omelets with broccoli and cheddar (mmmmm), egg salad (i love it with lots of celery) and fried rice- obviously not as "eggy" but still has them in it.  :-) I also saw something on Pinterest that was quite tasty- biscuit, egg and bacon in muffin tins. They're pretty good.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 03 May 2012, 19:45
Well then! It would seem that I am in a cooking mood today!
I just made scones. They turned out fairly well, but I lacked enough cream, so I ended up using half and half. And my currants disappeared, so I had to use raisins (which I don't really like in a scone but ah well). However, I was able to scrounge up some white chocolate chips, so that was cool. I just wished the scones looked like triangles, but ah well.

I also got an idea for a recipe, an oatmeal scone with raisins and milk chocolate chips. I do hpe to make that someday, but from what I have read, oatmeal scones are difficult to make well.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 03 May 2012, 19:54
Blutwurst!  Paul, you've taken me back to my childhood - there was this German buthcher in the little Hudson river village where I grew up.  My father loved the place, and introduced us to bockwurst (in spring), blutwurst, something he called sousse-salad (emphasis on the last syllable), which was actually head cheese, liverwurst (of course), and more that I can't even name.  Oh, and the best frankfurters in the world.  This guy made them all with meats from local farms. 

*sigh*

OK, eggs.  Does no one do soft-boiled?  When I was a kid, my mom chopped them up in a bowl for us (no egg cups).  I still like 'em that way, or over easy.  Then there's the toad-in-the-hole, where you cut the center out of a piece of bread, set it in a hot pan with butter, and break an egg into the hole.  Flip when cooked enough that the white's mostly solid, longer if you don't like runny yolk (like any fried egg).  Voila!  Buttered toast and egg together.  I usually put the cutout part of the bread in the pan as well...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 04 May 2012, 00:03
Then there's the toad-in-the-hole, where you cut the center out of a piece of bread, set it in a hot pan with butter, and break an egg into the hole.  Flip when cooked enough that the white's mostly solid, longer if you don't like runny yolk (like any fried egg).  Voila!  Buttered toast and egg together.  I usually put the cutout part of the bread in the pan as well...
I know that one as 'egg in a basket'. V served it to Evey for breakfast in V for Vendetta. I wanted to make it as soon as I watched that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: MrBlu on 04 May 2012, 02:19
This thread needs more pictures.

(aka "Fuck Yeah, I'm a Chef")
(https://p.twimg.com/ArHBqjTCEAEuhia.jpg)
(https://p.twimg.com/ArHFMHpCAAMppHi.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 04 May 2012, 05:11
Aren't these supposed to be accompanied by recipes?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 04 May 2012, 11:19
Then there's the toad-in-the-hole, where you cut the center out of a piece of bread, set it in a hot pan with butter, and break an egg into the hole.  Flip when cooked enough that the white's mostly solid, longer if you don't like runny yolk (like any fried egg).  Voila!  Buttered toast and egg together.  I usually put the cutout part of the bread in the pan as well...

Yesssss, those are delicious! A friend of mine introduced me to what we dubbed "Pankeggs": a similar idea to toad-in-the-hole, but you start out by frying the egg and then when it's firmed up, pour pancake batter over top. The absolute BEST hangover food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Sorflakne on 04 May 2012, 17:08
Making chili for the first time.  It's a beanless recipe, since I hate beans.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 04 May 2012, 19:35
I hate beans normally too, but they do add something to chili.
And I am a huge chili fan. How exactly are you making it? (seasoning, ingredients, etc.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 04 May 2012, 22:56
After playing Metal Gear Solid 4, I decided to try sunny side up eggs. They're my favorite eggs now. Barely cooked.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 05 May 2012, 00:26
I made curry last night by chopping up an onion, a courgette, a carrot, some purple sprouting broccoli and some potatoes, putting them with some red lentils, water and curry paste into my slow cooker, and leaving the whole thing for five hours. I think it could have done with an hour or two longer, or maybe less water, because it ended up being more like a sort of curried stew, but it was delicious. Served it with inauthentic co-op poppadums and wilted spinach to my incredibly sleep-deprived dissertation-writing friend.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 07 May 2012, 10:09
.......I don't know if this belongs in here or "Confessions", but I genuinely thought that a courgette was something that was not real and simply "invented" by the folks behind Neopets. It was only after Googling it that I discovered I eat them all the time and just call them by a different name. I also had no idea what a poppadum was. The internet is a wondrous place.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 07 May 2012, 10:29
It's the world that's wondrous.  The initernet just lets you see it. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 07 May 2012, 10:44
Glad to have enlightened you! Courgettes are marvellous. I have never quite got into calling them zucchinis, I always think of zambonis.

Tonight I'm having garlic and spinach spaghetti, because those are the foods I have in.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 07 May 2012, 11:05
Indeed, Carl-E...indeed.

I don't have a clue about what I'm doing for dinner, I totally forgot to take anything out of the freezer to defrost while I'm at work. I might end up making spaghetti too!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 07 May 2012, 11:20
.......I don't know if this belongs in here or "Confessions", but I genuinely thought that a courgette was something that was not real and simply "invented" by the folks behind Neopets. It was only after Googling it that I discovered I eat them all the time and just call them by a different name. I also had no idea what a poppadum was. The internet is a wondrous place.
Hah, imagine that. I thought the same thing about sporks.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 07 May 2012, 11:46
Mmmmmm that was delicious! I boiled some spaghetti, sauted a clove of garlic in butter, added a bunch of spinach and then served it up with a bit of grated cheese. Fast, simple and so tasty. I have found my new go-to meal!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 07 May 2012, 12:26
Hi, my name is Eric. I've been cooking since I was a wee lad. First thing I ever wanted to be was a chef. I really should have gone down that path.
Also, who likes pizza?
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8KAcTHdvVSk/ThQ-cb0MBvI/AAAAAAAAWCk/k27EMKjDeoQ/s640/IMG01408-20110702-2214.jpg)
I think this is feta, clam, olive, onion, spinach?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 07 May 2012, 14:44
I like pizza, but I've never liked clams. Spinach, tomato, and feta are really good on pizza.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 07 May 2012, 22:58
Carl-E -  I'm afraid I feel strongly compelled to correct you on a point. Toad in the hole doesn't contain any bread. Instead it is sausages cooked in Yorkshire Pudding batter.

Prick some good quality sausages and lay them out in a roasting tin oiled well with sunflower/vegetable oil (don't use olive oil, it's inappropriate for this) and put in an oven heated to 200c for twenty minutes. Pour in your batter and tip the pan to ensure equal coverage (you should have enough to reach almost half way up the sausages) and cook for another twenty minutes. Serve in single sausage slices with veg and gravy (which isn't really blood sauce).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 07 May 2012, 23:21
Gravy. 

Type (a): Get a packet or bottle labelled "gravy" and follow instructions.

Type (b): Roast a joint and remove to carving disk.  In the roasting pan remains the fat and (cooked and reduced) blood that have dripped out during cooking.  Skim off excess fat.  Add flour to make a roux.  Add water from the cooked vegetables or other vegetable stock while cooking on the hob until the appropriate consistency.  If more blood has dripped from the joint while resting, add that too.  Hence "blood sauce".

Historical note on Yorkshire Pudding.  Originally this was not made as separate rounds.  The joint was cooked on bars, and the batter was in a pan below.  The juices dripped from the joint into the batter to flavour it; a sort of solid gravy, I suppose you could say!  Serving a solid meat-flavoured batter with it helped a small joint to go further.  The relationship with (correct) Toad in the Hole is obvious, too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 08 May 2012, 01:32
Vegetarian gravy: get gravy granules. Heat vegetable stock. Stir granules into vegetable stock. Delicious sauce for your Sunday roast.

Alternative vegetarian gravy: fry onions. Do some kind of magic with flour and yeast extract (I have never actually managed to make this work). Add milk or something.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 08 May 2012, 02:40
Cut the oinons into thin rings, but not more.  Fry gently in a suitable vegetable oil (e.g. rape oil, which in the UK is sold as cheap generic oil, but is actually one of the better ones to use for many things) until wilted, then good and hot so that they brown and start to caramelise.  Take off the heat for a moment and then sprinkle the flour over the oily onions through a sieve; stir to combine the flour with the fat (forming a roux).  Then stir in the stock starting slowly to avoid lumps forming, and heat again to thicken.  I don't imagine it matters when you add the yeast extract.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 08 May 2012, 03:41
Whoever criticized British cooking deserves to be severely chastised. It's 6:30 a.m. here and I'm lusting for roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. My wife made it often in the 70s and 80s.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 08 May 2012, 03:47
That's what I miss most about living with my mum - she makes the most magnificent roast dinners every Sunday. The only point of contention is that she refuses to serve Yorkshire puddings with anything other than roast beef. Everyone else (barring her husband) would rather that yorkshires were included in every meal.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 08 May 2012, 03:49
I am not generally allowed to talk about gravy, for the sake of cross Mason-Dixion line relations but,

Flour gravy all the way home.  I was raised on gravy made in the pan from the drippings with flour.  Then I got this damn allergy and found out other people were using cornstarch to thicken gravy.  booo, no, what? packets also usually contain cornstarch.

The north and south can agree on this one thing, surely, gravy is thickened with flour. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 08 May 2012, 04:03
My wife came from Nashville. Her mom put bacon fat in lots of things, including what Clara called southern fried corn: corn sliced a little high off the ear to slice through the kernels, the remainder then scraped off with the back of the knife, the corn then thickened in a skillet (not truly fried) and with enough bacon fat to give it a great meaty taste. I still have some corn in the freezer. It just needs a little bacon fat to see if it's survived.

What other UK delicacies? I need a travel excuse. Are there still potato pubs there? Regional specialties in Cornwall if I should wish to visit the Doc Martin location? Wales if I want to hear good singing?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 08 May 2012, 04:08
Everyone else (barring her husband) would rather that yorkshires were included in every meal.

Yorkshire puddings with other meats is a recent innovation, in my experience.  I don't object to it, but they still work best with beef, I feel.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 08 May 2012, 04:16
If there is no roast, just make popovers. 

<3 Yorkshire pudding and popovers.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 08 May 2012, 04:30
What other UK delicacies? I need a travel excuse. Are there still potato pubs there? Regional specialties in Cornwall if I should wish to visit the Doc Martin location? Wales if I want to hear good singing?

You shouldn't need an excuse to visit the UK; we have the greatest variety of landscape plus a huge amount of history in conveniently sized island.

I don't know the term "potato pub", though it is not uncommon for pubs to serve baked potatoes with a variety of fillings.  But I would judge a pub by its Ploughman's.  This should be good sharp cheddar cheese, a hunk of white bread, and brown pickle.  Fripperies like butter for the bread, salad, or pieces of apple to contrast with the cheese are OK, but only so long as they don't obscure the quality (and quantity!) of the basics.  The "cheese pub" in Didsbury (South Manchester) serves little else, except that the main cheese is Lancashire, with a choice of "crumbly" or "creamy"; the quantities served are such that they also provide doggy-bags.  For some reason, Lancashire cheese does not travel well - eat it locally.

Cornwall - Cornish pasties, of course.

Look for a wide variety of stews and pies with stew-like fillings:  Lancashire hotpot, steak and kidney pudding, etc.  Around the coast especially, lots of fresh fish, whether as fish and chips (hard to beat, really - the best I've ever had was in Whitstable in Kent) or some kind of fish pie, or as soup (e.g. Cullen Skink).  Kippers for breakfast; Arbroath smokies - similar, but haddock rather than herring.

Puddings and cakes I don't have time to go on to right now - but right now I fancy an Eccles cake!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 08 May 2012, 06:03
Cornwall also does the best ice cream outside of Italy and possibly even then. And cream teas (go to both Cornwall and Devon to compare).

I don't know a lot about Welsh traditional food but the leek is their national vegetable so that's a good start.

If you go to any decent pub, you will discover traditional English food. If you go to the Golden Ball Hotel in Boxworth, Cambridgeshire, you will discover traditional English food at its finest.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 08 May 2012, 06:10
Whoever criticized British cooking deserves to be severely chastised. It's 6:30 a.m. here and I'm lusting for roast beef and Yorkshire pudding. My wife made it often in the 70s and 80s.

My dad would make killer Yorkshire puddings with his roast beefs (beef roasts?).  And we spooned the pan drippings over it, delightful! 
Been 30 years sice he made that... and I just have no idea.  We don't do roast beef 'round here (my wife can't stand it), so I've never had the opportunity. 

*sigh*

Well, off to work...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 08 May 2012, 06:39
I am not generally allowed to talk about gravy, for the sake of cross Mason-Dixion line relations but,

Flour gravy all the way home.  I was raised on gravy made in the pan from the drippings with flour.  Then I got this damn allergy and found out other people were using cornstarch to thicken gravy.  booo, no, what? packets also usually contain cornstarch.

The north and south can agree on this one thing, surely, gravy is thickened with flour.
This.
It is this simple. 50/50 fat to flour ratio. Brown flour in fat. Add cool liquid slowly while stirring to make gravy.
Corn Starch, I only find that acceptable to thicken Chinese sauces. That is what you find in most all "gravy packets." It works. But meh.   
I've done Standing Rib Roast with the pudding under catching the drippings. It really is wonderful. If you are a carnivore.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 08 May 2012, 07:32
My dad would make killer Yorkshire puddings with his roast beefs (beef roasts?).]
Roasts beef? Like attorneys-general and mothers in law? But probably not bloodys mary.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 08 May 2012, 07:37
Roast beef - as a mass noun-phrase.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 08 May 2012, 08:24
Like roast sheep!

(That was unfortunate.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: idontunderstand on 08 May 2012, 08:26
Since Bounty is about the only candy bar I'll ever touch, my girlfriend baked me a Bounty cake for my birthday. Think the original recipe is from that Nigella show, but she won't tell me. Recommended, I never want to eat anything else again.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 08 May 2012, 09:07
Had to google it - not available in the US (too similar to Hershey's Mounds). 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 08 May 2012, 09:24
Had to google it - not available in the US (too similar to Hershey's Mounds).
You saved me the trouble. Or so I thought until I saw "Hershey's," and had to Google the history of the candy:
"1988: Hershey Foods purchases Peter Paul/Cadbury Schweppes' U.S. operations, allowing Mounds and Almond Joy to join the hallowed ranks of Hershey's candy dynasty."

I buy a Mounds bar occasionally. I guess I haven't read the label. Why can't things stay the same?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 08 May 2012, 09:24
Why would the only candy bar you eat by Bounty? That's like saying the only pills you'll take are cyanide!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 08 May 2012, 10:00
To come back to the important issue of gravy,

The third way is to start with a roux, and then add stock plus anything from roast you fancy such as juices, a bit of deglaze, some marrow. It may seem a bit odd compared to the aforementioned type b) (type is a pitiful sop to the memory of gravy) but it does have the attraction that it allows you to give it a bit more time and let the flavour mature a bit on the hob. It also has the advantage of allowing you to add the wonderful extra's to personalise the gravy both to you and the meat/not meat that you're serving it with. Cider gravy for pork, red wine or ale gravy for beef, roast red onion and thyme for lamb and so on. Perhaps a touch of mustard or herbs, whisky if you're got a light bit of game on the go. All wonderful and not a blood sauce amongst them if you don't wish. I may be a bit radical but I'm of the opinion that the blood doesn't do a lot for the flavour.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 May 2012, 00:16
Wales if I want to hear good singing?

Boys Aloud (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7Cc8CNWrQs).  A choir made up of jobless or disaffected youths in Wales (ignore the inappropriate accompaniment).  There have been similar initiatives elsewhere, but there is something a little special in the Welsh male-voice choir tradition.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 09 May 2012, 01:44
If you're going to some of the more rural areas in Wales, I'd recommend: attending a livestock market, going to a Welsh chapel service (they generally have a start time publicised, but they actually start once they think everyone is there, and they finish when people start to look hungry), and remembering that there are still people who pretend not to don't speak English in Wales.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 May 2012, 02:14
there are still people who pretend not to don't speak English in Wales.

Mostly in the more remote areas of Central and Northern Wales - especially out along the Lleyn Peninsula, an area I have known very well since my teens - throughout my first marriage we holidayed near Aberdaron twice a year with old family friends, the ones who had brought us together, in fact.  At Easter we would bring back a locally grown and butchered lamb for the freezer.

OT: The family in about 1980 at St Mary's Well (http://cassland.org/images/StMarysWell.jpg), a spring on the cliffs overlooking Ynys Enlli (http://www.bardsey.org/english/the_island/island_history.htm) (Bardsey Island), a major seat of Celtic Christianity.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 09 May 2012, 03:01
Gonna bake a cake this week for my boyfriend's birthday because his actual present isn't until November. I'm thinking sickening amounts of chocolate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: idontunderstand on 09 May 2012, 04:45
Why would the only candy bar you eat by Bounty? That's like saying the only pills you'll take are cyanide!

Yeah, so? I like my cyanide!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 09 May 2012, 05:17
I'm making chilli con carne from a packet mix tonight. It feels a bit like cheating, but at the same time it is something I would never get round to making from scratch at the moment, too labour-intensive and too many fancy ingredients.

Also I feel like randomly plugging my cooking blog (http://faintwithhunger.blogspot.co.uk/) again. I'm pretty proud of it but it gets very few views (it isn't hugely interesting, I'll admit). The only people who I know actually read it are my family. Sigh.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 May 2012, 07:33
To come back to the important issue of gravy,

The third way is to start with a roux, and then add stock plus anything ...
Yes, all those important bits people overlook at the secrets to any great sauce (I feel). When I say 50/50 fat to flour I am speaking in the general. Usually my "fat" is all the rendered stuff. But certainly you speak the troof. It is kind oa akin to soup stock. You CAN (and I certainly HAVE) used bouillon or store bought broth. But it has the same consistency cold as heated. No natural gelatin or collagen melted in there. I feel proper broth has got to have those cooked down boney bits that make it look like meat jell-o when chilled.
And I generally do not skim the fat off until cooking. Because you can cook down that broth until all that is left if semi-solid glop and the fat, then add flour, liquid (milk, cooled broth, tomato juice, CIDER etc..) and you are back to making a great gravy/sauce.
Any crock pot fans on here?
Last weekend I got up, browned a chuck roast after dredging it in seasoned flour. Threw it in the crock on low with 1/3 cup of red wine. I took it out in the evening. Rinse the crock out and threw in a whole chicken with 1/3 c wine (again). I have food for the week.
My wife hipped me to this. I'd always put stuff int he crock pot submerged in liquid. It actually works better  putting just a wee bit of liquid. Otherwise the stuff just boils, is tough, and you have a good flavored broth by the protein is not so tasty. 1/4 cup of beer is a pretty good universal solution.
BTW, I had deglazed and reserved the iron skillet I browned that chuck in above. When  the meat was done I drained the liquid into that skillet, added mushrooms and the whole onion that cooked with the beef and reduced it. Then I added the fall-apart tender beef back in and stirred a few times. Instant gravy-beef-mushroom goodness.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 09 May 2012, 07:34
May, I added you to my (also very low traffic) recipe blog (http://veggie-recipe.blogspot.com)! I've started sprucing it up with the intention of posting in it again.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 May 2012, 07:48
Had to google it - not available in the US (too similar to Hershey's Mounds).
I was afraid to, like it'd be one of those weird English "flakey" chocolates. WTH?!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 09 May 2012, 11:07
Oh doombilly, don't put your chicken in a crock, get a chicken brick. It is the pinnacle of terracotta cooking joy and makes your crock look like a crock in comparison (for foul only). It is an especially brilliant thing if, like me, you feel an unstuffed chicken is a wasted opportunity.

Now off to make toad in the hole for dinner. birthdaywhoot
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 09 May 2012, 12:47
I really want to try a tamale. I have never tried one before, and it looks interesting and possibly tasty
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 May 2012, 13:28
Oh doombilly, don't put your chicken in a crock, get a chicken brick.
Happy Birthday.
Never heard of the chicken brick. I'm trying to downsize all my kitchen stuff. Also my wife thinks putting the stuffing actually in the bird is too limiting on how much you can make. I disagree. But like most people she's not really concerned with my opinion. :P
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: celticgeek on 09 May 2012, 13:29
I really want to try a tamale. I have never tried one before, and it looks interesting and possibly tasty

They are indeed interesting, and quite tasty.  I recommend them. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ALoveSupreme on 09 May 2012, 13:36
I dunno where you live and if this is possible but you need to leave your house right now and eat a tamale from the nearest restaurant possible.  Tamales are amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 09 May 2012, 13:37
Had to google it - not available in the US (too similar to Hershey's Mounds).
I was afraid to, like it'd be one of those weird English "flakey" chocolates. WTH?!

Bounties are amazing!

You talkin' bout Flakes?

(https://encrypted-tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTxbD1-4yujDrLSWM2nby-PkxQRPCYJeD6p-t4LF2y_JQWm8KwImQ)

For someone who plays Parker Flys, you can't tell me you don't like the look of that.

From May's Blog:

Quote
avoid buying more food when I have so much stored already.

Totally do this. I've got soup and a jar of cous-cous (plain, eugh) that I've had since probably November 2010. I know when I'm in the supermarket I should stop buying new ingredients, but it helps that I work there and get a discount...

Plus you're the only person I know who snacks on radishes. Good plan, I wish I could get back into just eating when I'm hungry instead of constantly misinterpreting thirst as a reason to eat 100g of chocolate.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 May 2012, 15:30
That chockie liiks more like poo than most. My first band had a "Scottish" drummer (Grew up and lived most of his life in Charlotte, NC). But he was born there. When his folks moved back and he visited he brought back some of those brittle bars. I guess maybe if I liked desserts or sweets or chocolate much it'd be different. But to me they are like eating a brown candle.
My taste in most things, guitars included is very suspect. Tonight it is Milwaukee's Best Light for dinner. Think I'll drink myself silly and see if I can get fired tomorrow. Did a pretty good warm up today. Seriously though. I just got my lab results back from my physical. Despite 30 years of hardcore drinking my liver is still kicking ass. And my cholesterol is super. And no diabetes. So I think maybe a bacon grease, tequila, and caramel stuffed something is on the menu.
Bon Apetit!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 09 May 2012, 18:07
We had some ripe bananas, so I decided t bake my mom an early mother's day present: A banana cake!

Since this was my first time baking a cake from scratch, It was a bit messy and I had to improvise on some ingredients. I will update this post later when we cut into and taste it, and maybe I will have pictures!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 09 May 2012, 19:01
I just cooked an Elio's frozen pizza and cut it into two squares. Then I microwaved a chicken patty and used the pizza as bread. It was fucking delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 10 May 2012, 12:28
I've come to the sad conclusion that there is a very large proportion of the world that doesn't know the childhood excitement of asking for a 99 flake. Oh the humanity.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 10 May 2012, 12:32
There is something sadly wrong with any childhood that did not include a 99 flake. But I believe America has neither real chocolate nor real ice cream so it is unsurprising.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: nobo on 10 May 2012, 12:44
I buy the flakes every time we go grocery shopping. A flake for me (although it is the one dipped in chocolate that goes by a different name, twirl maybe?), and a timeout for my wife. The timeout has a slight coffee taste to it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 10 May 2012, 14:14
The Time Out, an unsubstantiated Google article says, got as close as Canada until lagging sales forced it out. With the hint of coffee, it sounds very good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 11 May 2012, 04:22
I suppose in lieu of 99 flakes, American kids had Kool Aid and Twinkies.

And instead of saying stuff like "brown bread", they get to say classy things like "on swiss".

Generalisations, yeah!

Is it also weird to have fries with a meal that isn't a burger, in the US? I've got some American friends at university (classic/cliched Doctor-Who-Harry-Potter-Royal-Wedding-fans) and they seem to think ham, egg and chips is a huge novelty. They were also shocked that over here, cider gets you drunk.

Might make toad-in-the-hole later. Very cheap if you make it with basics/value batter mix, which costs something like 9p. With the reduced sausages I got, that makes the whole meal under £1. #studentluxury
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 11 May 2012, 04:43
Most diners here you can get fries with damn near anything.  Though not usually breakfast (ham and eggs would usually be considered a breakfast dish).  With breakfast you get "hash browns" (usually a deep fried shredded potato patty, or sometimes pan fried shredded potatoes), or "home fries", which are chopped pan-fried potatoes (sometimes with onions). 

And we've had alcoholic cider since the beginning of time, but it's an appalaichan thing.  Somewhere along the line the term "cider" got shifted to the non-alcoholic stuff.  Most people toss it when it starts fermenting.   :?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 11 May 2012, 05:54
We've had what has been dubbed Hard Cider for ages here too, but I always thought it was because we were in "upstate" NY and it's one of the things produced quite a lot here.

Mmmmm....deliciousness. Mulled cider is pretty tasty too.


And yeah, I agree with the fry sentiment. I think one of the only non-breakfast foods that you don't typically get fries with is any sort of pasta dish. We don't love our carbs THAT much. Although....my best friend used to order pancakes with a side of fries when we went to diners. Personally? I love home fries too much to consider anything as a replacement.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 12 May 2012, 00:42
You should try chips, real proper old school chippy chips, fried long and wrapped open in paper, salt and sarsons, after the bell on a balmy spring night, maybe with a dash of hendy's or a squirt of broon, tucked in a ginnel 'cause of the murk and washed down with a can of D&B or some ligged spesh before you go top and front on the 83. Now if only you could still skitch up a routemaster everything would be perfect.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 12 May 2012, 06:37
Hold on, let me get my English-to-English dictionary...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 12 May 2012, 06:46
Carl-E: Post the translation?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 12 May 2012, 07:31
You should try chips, real proper old school chippy chips, fried long and wrapped open in paper, salt and sarsons (a vinegar brand), after school on a balmy spring night, maybe with a dash of hendy's or a squirt of broon (mustards?), tucked in a ginnel (sitting between two close buildings) 'cause of the murk (rain/fog) and washed down with a can of D&B (dark and bitter beer) or some ligged spesh (light special?) before you go top and front on the 83 (walk back along the M83? just a guess...). Now if only you could still skitch up a routemaster (catch a bus) everything would be perfect.

Too much guesswork involved.  I think my dictionary's getting old...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: schimmy on 12 May 2012, 07:44
My guess would be that D&B refers to Dandelion and Burdock.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 12 May 2012, 07:48
Thanks for the effort. Wonder if Seldom Killer gives tours.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 May 2012, 08:31
You should try chips, real proper old school chippy chips, fried long and wrapped open in paper, salt and sarsons, after the bell on a balmy spring night, maybe with a dash of hendy's or a squirt of broon, tucked in a ginnel 'cause of the murk and washed down with a can of D&B or some ligged spesh before you go top and front on the 83. Now if only you could still skitch up a routemaster everything would be perfect.

Chips:

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/83/247371999_08c2ea1fe4.jpg (http://farm1.static.flickr.com/83/247371999_08c2ea1fe4.jpg)

Sarsons is indeed vinegar.

After the Bell, I'm assuming is a pub (standard pub name). Hendy's is Hendersons, a Yorkshire relish (type of sauce). Broon does indeed mean brown sauce. Ginnel is what I call snicket, ie a small alleyway, so I'm not sure what that is. Murk might well be mess, from the chips.  D&B is dandelion and burdock, a fizzy drink (public service announcement: do not actually dip your chips in the D&B, it is disgusting). Not sure about ligged spesh but probably some kind of cider. The 83 is a bus, they're known by their route numbers, and you'd be sitting on the top deck at the front pretending to be the driver/fly. Routemasters are not just a bus, they were the best buses:

http://www.thermmanual.com/rm1small.jpg (http://www.thermmanual.com/rm1small.jpg)

Don't blame your dictionary, most of that is Yorkshire dialect. It's another language altogether, and even I (a born Yorkshirewoman) had to google some of it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 12 May 2012, 09:16
If I hadn't read it, I would've sworn that would be out of Ulysses or something. Perhaps Yorkshire needs a literary revolution?

But actual chippy chips are the best. Here in Britain (mostly in Essex/London) we like to combine our Chinese take-aways with chip shops, meaning it is very common to order your chips with curry sauce. I admit its weird, but its great to come home with some beef chow mein and a large packet of them. I skip the Sarsons, though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 12 May 2012, 09:31
After the Bell, I'm assuming is a pub (standard pub name).

I read it as after closing time (signalled by ringing a bell behind the bar), though I don't know how many chippies would still be open then.

Ginnel is what I call snicket, ie a small alleyway, so I'm not sure what that is. Murk might well be mess, from the chips.

Surely murk is the murky (dank or gloomy) weather, so picture sheltering from the drizzle in a side-alley.

Not sure about ligged spesh

Ligging is freeloading; spesh is surely special - so I picture nicking the dregs of a glass of beer left on a table outside the pub (this may well be fanciful, though).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 12 May 2012, 09:46
There is something sadly wrong with any childhood that did not include a 99 flake. But I believe America has neither real chocolate nor real ice cream so it is unsurprising.

Oi! I tend to get most of my sweets at the co-op rather than through, say, Hershey's or Byrne Dairy, so I get pretty top notch ice cream and chocolates. Not that fake, waxy Hershey's crap.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 May 2012, 10:13
Murk makes sense that way, but it is a balmy spring night! Your other suggestions make more sense than mine though. Which is embarassing...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 12 May 2012, 10:32
My father was from Sheffield.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 12 May 2012, 11:35
at least it wasn't in cockney rhyming slang.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 12 May 2012, 12:07
Rice, processed cheese spread, and refried beans. I have three or four meals here for about a dollar.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 May 2012, 12:12
Meals which are likely to give you scurvy over any prolonged duration, but meals nonetheless!

I'm having more of my lentil curry, with the most perfect rice I've ever made. Almost entirely due to my rice cooker, but I'm still proud.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 12 May 2012, 12:16
No scurvy here, miss. I had an orange yesterday.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 12 May 2012, 12:35
You should try chips, real proper old school chippy chips, fried long and wrapped open in paper, salt and sarsons, after the bell on a balmy spring night, maybe with a dash of hendy's or a squirt of broon, tucked in a ginnel 'cause of the murk and washed down with a can of D&B or some ligged spesh before you go top and front on the 83. Now if only you could still skitch up a routemaster everything would be perfect.

You've managed to get almost all of that in bits and pieces. It's not specifically Yorkshire and take slang from several places. I was hoping to evoke the culinary delight only available in the UK (and Ireland by all accounts) full of wonderful little regional variations and hits its absolute prime at around 11pm on a weekday night when you've been out for a few drinks with your friends and while bed is a short time away you still get to play out that those remaining moments of mildly drunken exhuberence that puts you on top of the world.

The plainer English translation is:

You should try chips as opposed to fries of any stripe from, an old fashioned fish and chip shop, (not a kebab/chinese/burger/chicken/pizza shop or any other late night fast food shop selling deep fried potato products) cooked until they're really crispy and crunchy giving way to a fluffy inner delight some of them need to be at least as long as your hand. Have them wrapped in a cone of chip shop paper so you can eat them straight away, flavoured with salt and malt vinegar, after the leaving the pub at closing time on a chilly spring night, maybe with a dash of local a local condiment such as Henderson's Relish or Worcestershire Sauce (pronounced Wuster Sorce) or a squirt of good sauce like HP, ketchup, garlic mayo or whatever is popular where you live, tucked in a porch or alley or other shelter from the wind because it's a bit blowy and damp but not so as you're forced inside and washed down with a can of favourite local soft drink (Dandelion & Burdock, Irn Bru, Cream Soda) or some under the counter lager from the chip shop (or unlicensed takeout from the pub if needs must) before you ride home in the front seats of the top deck of a double decker bus (offically the best view in the world, especially if the route home has quite a few tight corners). Now if only you could still take a running jump onto the back of a moving open backed bus everything would be perfect.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 May 2012, 14:07
Balmy definitely means warm.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 12 May 2012, 14:39
No scurvy here, miss. I had an orange yesterday.

haha, my first band had a song called, "Scurvy...(I've got)"
don't think it is online anywhere though. Might have to post that one.
"I've noticed recently / there's something wrong with me/my teeth fell out and my gums bleed/ I've neglected my Vitamin C / NOW I'VE GOT SCURVY!..."
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 12 May 2012, 15:20
Balmy definitely means warm.

It can be warm as well as blowy and damp, though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 13 May 2012, 08:39
(http://assets6.pinimg.com/upload/203787951858840440_ZEz6tcDh_c.jpg)
Wheat-Oat bread
-
(http://assets6.pinimg.com/upload/203787951858840437_mHwQRpVW_c.jpg)
Chicken pie crust fail. Ok so I used store bought crusts. And the top one did not want to cooperate. This is consequently the chicken left over from the crock pot extravaganza last weekend. Thickened with some milk/flour mixture and some grated raw potato. We'll see what a mess it is tonight.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 14 May 2012, 19:26
I think I am going to try to make a milkshake. 

Chocolate ice cream, Baylies, Rum. I am nervous that maybe I should just do a shot of rum and then eat ice cream instead of risking this tasting bad. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 15 May 2012, 04:15
Heinz vegetable soup is disgusting. And adding three-day old rice to it didn't help at all. Ugh.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 15 May 2012, 13:40
Spaghetti and eggs.  Have I mentioned this before? 

Heat the (usually leftover) spaghetti ina pan with some butter
scramble an egg or two (beat with a splash of milk)
pour over the spaghetti, don't stir too much, but keep it moving. 

the proportion should be so that there's egg all through the spaghetti, not a spaghetti omlette. 

Comfort food from my gramma's house.  Good proportion of carbs to protien, but kinda heavy on the fat (yolk, butter). 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 15 May 2012, 15:43
I filled an oven dish with cauliflower, ham cubes and homemade cheese sauce. I'd forgotten how tasty cauliflower can be!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 16 May 2012, 07:10
I'm trying to break in my new meat tenderizer. Any tips for chicken fried steak?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 16 May 2012, 07:21
Other than "don't do it"?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 16 May 2012, 08:17
What do you have against fried beef covered in gravy?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 16 May 2012, 09:12
Spaghetti and eggs.  Have I mentioned this before? 

Heat the (usually leftover) spaghetti ina pan with some butter
scramble an egg or two (beat with a splash of milk)
pour over the spaghetti, don't stir too much, but keep it moving. 

the proportion should be so that there's egg all through the spaghetti, not a spaghetti omlette. 

Comfort food from my gramma's house.  Good proportion of carbs to protien, but kinda heavy on the fat (yolk, butter).
Not terribly removed from Spaghetti carbonara. Only you use raw eggs and use the heat of the freshly cooked  pasta to cook the eggs. It is a bit more involved than that. I'll post my recipe sometime when I have it in hand. I use country ham insteak of proscioutto. Because, way cheaper, and I think you need that level of saltyness to fight the heavy cream and parmasean.
I'm trying to break in my new meat tenderizer. Any tips for chicken fried steak?
I just use cube steak. Dredge in spiced flour. Egg wash. Dredge again. Fry. use the flour and fat from this process to make the gravy. I usually opt for milk to make the gravy. Because HEART HEALTHY!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 16 May 2012, 13:49
What do you have against fried beef covered in gravy?

There are better ways to hide the flavor of your beef.  But if you're that intent on covering the taste of the beef that much, why are you doing anything with it in the first place? 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 16 May 2012, 17:13
I absolutely love a nice steak with nothing on it, but a slight char, its own blood, and a little pepper. Sometimes I buy a chuck roast to grind into burger, but this time I cut a couple slices off with the intention of pounding the shit out of them with a spikey hammer, covering in flour, and frying.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 16 May 2012, 17:30
I filled an oven dish with cauliflower, ham cubes and homemade cheese sauce. I'd forgotten how tasty cauliflower can be!

Recently rediscovered cauliflower... heat a little bit of chicken stock (I sometimes use a packet of ramen flavouring :o) and butter in a saucepan, plop down a small-/medium-sized cauliflower, put on the lid and let it cook for ten minutes. Serve with eg. cod fillets (dunked in salt-water flavoured with lemon zest for 20 mins) cooked in the oven for 10 mins. Keep a pan of water in the oven so it's really steamy. I was introduced to this yumminess a few months ago and I still can't get over how delicious, filling and--above all--simple it is. It's nice to add some sambal oelek and lemon juice to the stock. I sometimes thicken it with flour but it's good just poured over the cauliflower and fish too :)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 16 May 2012, 19:07
I absolutely love a nice steak with nothing on it, but a slight char, its own blood, and a little pepper.
Yeah. Chicken fried steak is for, well inferior cuts. A decent piece of meat needs very little attention and the more you give the worse it gets. Like biscuit (not UK) dough.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 16 May 2012, 22:45
or pie crust.  So many pie crusts are ruined by people mixing them....
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 17 May 2012, 03:43
My wife made great cherry pies, with a crust she made from scratch and without measuring. It's a surprisingly major regret that I didn't even try to learn it before she died.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 17 May 2012, 04:22
When comparing the pastry made by myself, my wife, her sister and their mother, it is curious to observe that each of us seems to produce the same quality (or lack of it) consistently, regardless of whether we make it by hand or in a mixing machine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 17 May 2012, 06:12
0_o

But...but piecrust is so simple!  Flour to fat, 3:1 (my dad uses butter, my wife and I use crisco, both are delicious), cut the fat into the flour thoroughly (we use a pastry cutter, several C shaped parallel wires with a handle, but I know people who use two knives and the like).  Add ice cold water by the tablespoon, turning it over and mashing it together by hand until it all holds together in a ball.  NO MORE water than that, it gets... gooey. 

Then roll it out. 

NO mixing - you encourage the formation of long strings of gluten that make the pastry bind up into a hard mass instead of flaking apart like it should.  Each flake is a little lump of the flour/fat mixture that got rolled out, they were only held together by the water long enough to bake.  You're not making dough!


My work here is done.  Carry on, citizens!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 May 2012, 07:18
If you have to use your hands and the pastry starts to get warm and sticky, put it in the freezer for two minutes to cool back down. Works for crumble as well, and it was revelatory to me (I might even have got all excited about it here when I first tried it).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 17 May 2012, 07:27
0_o

But...but piecrust is so simple!  Flour to fat, 3:1 (my dad uses butter, my wife and I use crisco, both are delicious), cut the fat into the flour thoroughly (we use a pastry cutter, several C shaped parallel wires with a handle, but I know people who use two knives and the like).  Add ice cold water by the tablespoon, turning it over and mashing it together by hand until it all holds together in a ball.  NO MORE water than that, it gets... gooey. 

Then roll it out. 
NO mixing - you encourage the formation of long strings of gluten that make the pastry bind up into a hard mass instead of flaking apart like it should.  Each flake is a little lump of the flour/fat mixture that got rolled out, they were only held together by the water long enough to bake.  You're not making dough!
My work here is done.  Carry on, citizens!

Good work, both of you! Clara used a pastry cutter. I found it just now; it's not three C-shaped wires as I thought I'd remembered, but more like 3 fairly rigid flat dull "blades" attached to a handle. In the process of overthinking the process and exaggerating the obstacles -- something many of us here do well -- I wish I had a Youtube visual for the manipulation. But your brief description ought to be enough.
I don't have a recipe for her cherry filling, only that she used canned tart cherries, sugar, cornstarch and almond extract. I don't believe she baked the shell ahead of time. She used strips across the top. She could start a pie on the spur of the moment, with company expected any moment. The only thing that sometimes threw her was unexpectedly old flour.
And I think Clara used the freezer trick, too. I know her process depended on temperature and humidity in the kitchen.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 17 May 2012, 07:47
In addition to the gluten thing the reason you shouldn't over mix pie crust is because you want some chunks of fat in there to melt out as it cooks, that is what makes it flaky.  If you mix the dough too well then you make a paste and there are no bits left to leave flaky, yummy pockets of awesome.  The largest pieces of fat should be about the size of peas when you add the water.

You guys are making me want a pie now. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 17 May 2012, 08:14
About the fat: I know we didn't keep Crisco in the house for years; I'm not sure if I recall her using butter (salted? unsalted?). Is cooking oil, olive or otherwise, ever used in a flaky pie crust? If sounds like the thicker consistency of butter or shortening would keep globs of oil intact.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 17 May 2012, 08:19
Just Google for instructions; e.g. here's one (http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Baked-Vegetable-Oil-Pastry-Shell)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 May 2012, 08:47
It is possible to use oil instead, I think, but I never have. It would change the consistency I'd imagine.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 17 May 2012, 09:01
Oil wouldn't make it flakey. The flour needs to hold onto all these little pieces of butter or shortening. Oil would just mix in to everything
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 17 May 2012, 10:03
Cherry pie from canned cherries:

2 cans sour pitted cherries
1 cup sugar
1 t salt
1/4 cup cornstarch
2 T butter
1 t almond extract
2 pie crusts

Put one crust into a pie dish. Use a knife or small cookie cutter to make steam vents in the other crust, then set it aside to be the lid. In a sauce pan over medium heat, combine sugar, salt, cornstarch, and the liquid from the cherries. Stir constantly until the liquid becomes thick and clearish (about 15 minutes). Add the butter, almond extract, and cherries. Mix, then pour into the pie dish. Cover with the top crust, seal the edges, and sprinkle with sugar. Cover the edges loosely with a strip of tin foil to keep the crust from burning. Bake 30 minutes at 425. Remove the foil and bake another 15 minutes.

And my grandma's pie crust recipe:
(http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b291/bainidhedub/piecrust.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 17 May 2012, 10:10
Yeah, I would not use oil. But why not lard? I think it might actually be better for you than Crisco. Unless you don't eat animal products. Then you are pretty much gonna need some hydrogenated vegetable shortening. It is awful for you, but I wonder how palm oil in its congealed form would work? That stuff is nasty looking. Still unless you are eating pie crust every day, or the whole pie yourself that might be interesting.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 17 May 2012, 11:11
I don't think lard would be a problem.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 17 May 2012, 13:19
Yeah, I know historically it was used for this a lot. I just meant, "would it gross you out to use lard? and if not, give it a try." Also, I suck at pie crusts.
Got a bunch of pork neck bones in the fridge and some corn on the cob. Wonder what the heck I'll do tonight?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 17 May 2012, 13:50
Corn on the cob? Lard? Slice the corn off the cob in two strokes, one through the kernels, one to remove what remains, heat in a skillet until corn thickens, add bacon grease to taste. But maybe I already said that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 May 2012, 13:56
I had my vegetarian chilli con carne (or as Edith suggested, chilli con Quorne) with lemon and coriander-flavoured cous cous tonight. It was delicious, and according to MyFitnessPal I have eaten an almost perfectly balanced diet today. I've got 74 calories left over, 7g of protein and 18g of carbs but I'm not hungry so I guess I've got a slightly higher calorie deficit. I WILL be healthier by summer. No more ice cream binges.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Akima on 17 May 2012, 16:56
Chilli con Quorne
Excellent! Especially if you use the Spanish pronunciation of "Qu".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 17 May 2012, 17:01
Corn on the cob? Lard? Slice the corn off the cob in two strokes, one through the kernels, one to remove what remains, heat in a skillet until corn thickens, add bacon grease to taste. But maybe I already said that.
Well, I decided to marinate the boney bits in OJ, sweet chili sauce, rice vinegar, black/red pepper, and milwaukee's best light. Then put on a broiler pan on 250degF. I'm gonna let that go for some hours. This stuff is really boney. Not a lot to eat there. But maybe I'll pick it like crab claws and add those bits to the stuff that forms in the broiler, rest of the marinade, and cook the corn in that? Maybe serve on a bed of salad greens?
 
Also Barmymoo, keep up the good work. Ice cream is a treat though!

My oregano was very fragrant i noticed last week. So I've picked a bunch and am drying it. It has been growing outside my basement door for years but I always seem to get it too late and it tastes just weedy. Also I have decided to never mow my lawn again. Scourge of the neighborhood, I am. But the oregano is creeping out in the yard.  :evil:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 17 May 2012, 20:16
You sure that's oregano, son? 

(http://media.screened.com/uploads/0/1153/83853-marijuana_leaf_box_art.jpg)


 :-D :police: :angel:
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 17 May 2012, 23:20
I read "crab claws" and pictured bear claws. Razor sharp hairy knuckle bear claws.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 18 May 2012, 05:30
Grrrrrrrrrrrrr. /BEARy
 Anyway, it was awful. I ate a can of pork-n-beans standing over the sink. The end.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 18 May 2012, 05:42
Did someone mention bear claws (http://bearmageddon.com/)?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 18 May 2012, 05:57
Grrrrrrrrrrrrr. /BEARy
 Anyway, it was awful. I ate a can of pork-n-beans standing over the sink. The end.
Well, it sounded creative.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 19 May 2012, 09:36
There is nothing better than homemade crepes, frshly cooked right in front of you by hipsters in some culinary program
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 19 May 2012, 16:28
I have not made a crepe since Reagan was preznit. Maybe that should change?

On other news, heh my boney pork nightmare from the othernight (wherein I opted to eat canned beaans over the sink)- I saved the boney bits. They are boiling up to make a broth. Added half a bulb of garlic, a good slug of olive oil, a handful of korean red pepper powder, 1 tsp of my habanero death ray (http://media-cache3.pinterest.com/upload/203787951858449450_bGjfIgN1_f.jpg) paste, exactly 1 gob of szechuan peppercorns, the leafy north 4" of a bunch of celery, and one cheap beer. Also some random leftovers 2 sprgs of broccoli and a button mushroom. Mainly because it's now or never for these. If I get a couple molecules of flavor out of them, so be it. Salt.
Added some of the aforementioned oregano. It dried up nicely in a paper bag.
Yes Carl-E; while it has been a long time- I do know perennial herbs from the only annual HERB worth growing. ahem. Anyway, it is boiling away upstairs. Let's add a couple cups of tomato sauce I thawed out. I'll give it an hour. Salt some more.
Then strain the mess. I just want the liquid.
Add the bit of elbow macaroni I have and boil that till done. Add 1 can of fava beans, spoon over baby spinach in a bowl. Hope this works out. I'm out of pork-n-beans. :D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 19 May 2012, 16:52
WIP
(http://media-cache7.pinterest.com/upload/203787951858867871_20zjQuMi_f.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 19 May 2012, 18:53
begat
(http://media-cache6.pinterest.com/upload/203787951858868227_vMv6LOFc_f.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 19 May 2012, 19:24
I hope that was half as good as it looks! 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 20 May 2012, 06:28
It really was good. Kinda pasta fagioli (or as my wife sez, "pasta fazoo"). Just with different flavorings. Or similar I guess to minestroni too. But the pork broth came out rich. I was leaning on something akin to viet pho hu tiue (http://vietworldkitchen.typepad.com/blog/2007/11/hu-tieu-nam-van.html) broth. Which wow, I now find out is more Chinese-Cambodian. Neat. Gotta love the internets! ok, I have to make another quiche for breakfasts this week and put my chicken breasts onto marinade for dinner before I can come back down here and practice 2 albums worth of songs and 4 new ones. :D Toodles.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 21 May 2012, 02:45
I cooked spaghetti bolognese last night! The first properly from scratch meal I've made in the new house, so I wasn't always yelling at Mammy to tell if I was doing it right.

It was yummy and I made enough it'll do for tonight's dinner as well. Economical!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 21 May 2012, 03:54
Yum, Welu. Guys have any of y'all ever read Steve Albini's cooking blog. It is pretty entertaining.
http://mariobatalivoice.blogspot.com/
Also since I re-Quiched again this week, thought I'd share a slice.
(http://media-cache7.pinterest.com/upload/203787951858869843_a82VbZjA_f.jpg)
Bacon, sausage, spinach, cheddar, enoki...all kind of layered.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 21 May 2012, 08:49
Welp!  Time for breakfast! 


Wait, when's that quiche supposed to arrive? 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 21 May 2012, 11:45
Did you not get your QMail? Oh gee, I hope it didn't get lost. :P
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 21 May 2012, 16:15
Guys, nettle soup is delicious. We were gifted with a lot of stinging nettles (little itty bitty baby ones of course) and through a relatively quick, simple and easy process the whole lot was turned into soup. Delicious soup that tasted of spring, even though I'd never before had nettle soup in spring. It also tasted of thinly sliced smoked ox-heart. Yes, smoked ox heart. No, I haven't been made a lord of the land--but the half-price gods have been very kind to me lately. I now pray for genetically engineered dual-heart oxen so that the price of smoked ox-heart may come down.

The half-price gods also saw fit to give me cumberland sauce, which was very easy to jazz up with some red wine and assorted goodies and goes great with roast lamb. Honestly though I wanted to just glug it down straight, it was so good. Those of you who've grown up with frequent exposure to Cumberland sauce: I envy you.

Can't believe I haven't tried these things until now. Envy and regrey notwithstanding, the past few days have been terrific wrt food. I always forget just how much yummier life becomes after spring kicks into gear.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 21 May 2012, 16:59
You just brought me back to 1985. I've never eaten nettles, but my only exposure was walking through some high weeds, intoxicated and getting this sensation that was altogether unpleasant. My roommate and chief cohort at the State park we were living and working in that summer just said "oh yeah we've just gotten into some stinking nettles." Not having been in NC for much more than 2 years I was in a serious state of WTF. What do they taste like? Cumberland sauce? Must. Google. Now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 21 May 2012, 17:37
Your friend misappropriated the term stinging nettles.  They have an aroma, but it's not a stink. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 21 May 2012, 18:50
Derp.derp Just pan-fried some flounder filets in panko,spices (really into korean red pepper powder these days), n- butter. It mostly fell apart which is ok. Served chunked over a simple salad. Also marinading some short ribs in korean bbq sauce for tomorrow. Those nettles stink! I tells ya.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 21 May 2012, 21:44
Today I actually made a sandwich and took it with me to go somewhere instead of buying McDonald's. I'm very proud of myself.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 22 May 2012, 00:08
Good call! Macdonalds is the food of the devil (vegetarians are contractually obliged to say that whenever the opportunity presents itself) but even if that were not the case, making your own food is so much cheaper.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 22 May 2012, 02:33
Actually, it was a chicken salad sandwich on a bulkie roll. I used one leftover chicken thigh and some mayonnaise to make it. The cost of chicken per pound and the few dollars I spent on those rolls probably makes that sandwich more than a dollar, which is what I'd pay for a McDouble.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 22 May 2012, 04:40
But you already had the chicken, and if you hadn't used it you might well have ended up throwing it out. Making all your own meals means far less food waste.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 22 May 2012, 06:32
So...the "menu" I got from my doc to fix my cholesterol woes is not so much a menu as "don't eat anything you are currently eating with the exception of salad and chicken".

Do you guys have any favorite low-fat/low-cholesterol meals? I know a lot of it is common sense (no bacon, no sour cream, lots of fruits and veggies, fat-free everything) but I'm noticing that some things that I would think to be ok, are actually not. And I'm not used to consciously tailoring my meals to certain specifications- usually I just try to go for "well rounded".
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 22 May 2012, 06:47
Here are some of my low-cal favorites:
Tilapia filets, bought individually sealed, dipped in shake'n'bake (for pork) and sauteed. I put it on a griddle.
The same would probably work for chicken.
I have a daily strawberry smoothie at lunch: about 8 oz of frozen strawberries (get mine by the 4lb at Kroger, not exactly cheap), microwaved for 30 secs, blended with 8 oz skim milk and 2 packets of sweetener.
Any of the lean Michaelina brand frozen entrees. I eat them over about 8 oz of defrosted mixed veg, such as Kroger-brand Italian, Asian or California-style. I can't say if they're all that healthy -- I don't check about preservatives, and some of them are a little sweet, but the calorie count of the entrees are all under 300, the vegetables lower the calorie density, and they mostly taste pretty good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 22 May 2012, 07:25
I've found that lentils/beans tend to be really useful, especially if you're trying stay away from stuff like ground beef, which can be expensive if you're getting good-quality extra lean stuff. Makes all sorts - curries, italian dishes (lasagne, chilli, etc) and very cheap. I love a good bean chilli with brown rice and a side of washed raw spinach leaves (folic acid yeahhh)

I've found Gojee (http://www.gojee.com/)to be really useful (was this from this thread? I can't remember). Simply type in an ingredient and get a load of cool recipies, not all are fat free but some are, and others you can substitute things out for low-cal alternatives.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 22 May 2012, 08:33
Yeah another good lean protein fish I'm seeing around supermarkets a lot is Swai. I kind of like it. Once I stopped trying to grill in and started just baking it, it came out nice. It was good on the grill but stuck to it too much. Also cholesterol can be tricky. Don't starve yourself of all fats. Your body thinks it is starving and just hangs onto them. Get lots of whole grain stuff. Opt for brown (long cook) rice over instant. Meh, I cannot abide whole wheat pasta though. It's from hell. But I thik a lot of the "fat substitutes" are worse for you than the thing they are supposed to replace. e.g. Margarine. Tastes like butt not butter. Horrible for you. Don't want either, use a good quality of olive oil.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 22 May 2012, 10:29
Do you have access to those cholesterol-lowering yoghurt drinks? My step dad had dangerously high cholesterol and combined a change of diet with drinking those daily and going for a walk every afternoon, and his levels have dropped to a totally safe level in about six months. He did things like changing butter for low-fat spread, not eating desserts every day etc. No radical changes, just a lot of cutting back on things he liked. You can do it! The golden rule is not to change your diet so much that you feel deprived, because then you'll never stick with it long-term.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 22 May 2012, 13:19
Thanks everyone!

I will definitely be stocking up on lots of veggies, beans and olive oil! Lean ground beef has definitely been on the pricey side lately, but there are a boatload of sales with Memorial Day and all the other barbequing holidays coming up. I'm going to try substituting half the beef in any recipes that call for it with beans (and hope that the fiance doesn't notice). I bought "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" a few weeks ago and after looking at the nutrition info, I Can't Believe People Think This Stuff Is Healthier Than Butter.  :-P

I'm trying to figure out what good fats come from and also trying to distinguish Really Bad Fats from Not So Bad fats. I know that Saturated and Trans are "bad fats" and Polyunsaturated & Monounsaturated are "good fats", but it's tough to remember where they all come from!

May- I've never heard of those drinks, but I'm off to Google them now! Hopefully they're sold around here  :-)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 22 May 2012, 13:30
The best rule of thumb is that the closer to its natural state a food is, the more likely it is to be healthy. That doesn't mean just living on a diet of eggs, but it's not a bad way to distinguish between two things in a hurry.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 22 May 2012, 14:04
Did someone say oats? Oats oats oats!   They are high in soluble fiber, which is good for scrubbing out your arteries. Also a bonus, they taste great! 

Also for whole grains I whole heatedly recommend wheat berries.  They are just whole wheat grains.  You can buy them in most health food sections.  You cook them like rice, but they take a bit more water and a bit longer (directions on the package).  I think they are so good, a bit chewy, nutty flavor, and filling.  I usually just eat them plain or with a little olive oil/butter and salt.  I also think they would be good sweet.  I am thinking something with honey and strawberries?  I'll be playing with them when fruit prices drop for summer.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 22 May 2012, 15:21
Papersatan is totes right. OATS!
That is ounce for ounce I think the most fiber and if you aren't into high fiber, branny foods is also the most innocuous. I use plain old rolled oats in my cereal mix with (I use full fat yogurt). Be wary of pretty much all packaged cereal that has more than 1 or two ingredients. Like: puffed wheat, contains wheat. Shreaded wheat, contains wheat. Fuck Kashi and all that bullshit. My cereal mix is grape nuts (worst name, best cereal); puffed red wheat (can no longer find this); shredded wheat. Add some nuts sparingly. Raisins, cheap and really chock full of goodness.
When I make bread though I usually substitute 1/3 of the flour with plain old rolled (long cook oatmeal) oats.
Whoah, I just realized I put short ribs on to marinade last night. All this healthy talk has me primed to sniff glue and have unprotected sex with dodgy looking mammals at the bus depot.
 8-)
Well the beef is really, really lean.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 22 May 2012, 15:56
My favorite cereal is Count Chocula and it has vitamins and shit in it. Says so on the box.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 22 May 2012, 16:38
If they gave you vitamins with URANIUM235 -you'd be getting vitamins.
In any event. I'm on here too much. Didn't mean to sound preeeeech-y.
I'm probably going to some culinary institute this yr. To get institutionalized. Suicidal Tendencies stylez. I'm on here too much. Sorry. My wife is 500 miles away.
I think food is good. I'm for it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 22 May 2012, 17:28
I'm on here too much. Sorry. My wife is 500 miles away.
All the more reason for you to be on here more than usual. Post away. My wife's a lot farther away than that. It's one of the reasons I hang out here and post. So don't apologize.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 22 May 2012, 18:23
re: wheat berries / would be good sweet
They are! My mom's friend has this recipe for this fruit & grain salad (http://veggie-recipe.blogspot.com/2012/05/fruited-grain-salad.html) that's basically wheat berries, rice, barley, plum, apple, and golden raisins.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 22 May 2012, 18:56
Oatmeal every morning for breakfast.  One (rounded) spoon of brown sugar and a splash of skim milk.  Very filling. 

I use a scoop that came in a quaker oats box years ago for measuring it.  It just says "One Serving", but I recently found it's equivalent to 1/3 cup.  Just right!  In the bowl with 2 scoops of water, then in the microwave, 6 minutes at 40% power (so it doesn't boil over).  The texture is perfect... YMMV, microwaves are fickle. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 22 May 2012, 20:17
I bought "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" a few weeks ago and after looking at the nutrition info, I Can't Believe People Think This Stuff Is Healthier Than Butter.  :-P

Smart Balance! Buy Smart Balance instead. I really like the kind with olive oil. The only time I use butter anymore is for baking and making icing*, I use SB for everything else and it works just fine.

*I don't care what anyone says, baked goods do taste different without butter and margarine in icing is nasty. Usually I make cream cheese icing, though, because it doesn't need as much sugar and a brick of cream cheese has about a quarter of the calories than a stick of unsalted butter.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 22 May 2012, 23:16
My folks use Olivio, it's surprisingly delicious. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 22 May 2012, 23:58
I use a soy spread called Pure in the UK for almost everything; it has a quite neutral taste, so is always inoffensive.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 23 May 2012, 00:03
I use Sainsburys Sunflower Spread, which I think is basically a cheap version of Pure (or one of the others, anyway). I do use butter for many things still, like 20g to fry some garlic and spinach for pasta, or for making crumble, but you can equally use spread. Linds is right, it does change the flavour but not so much that the baking is ruined.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 23 May 2012, 00:09
Sunflower oil is actually not one of the healthier ones, which is why I no longer use sunflower-based spreads.  For frying I use rape-seed oil (is that canola in the US?), which has the additional benefit of being the cheapest!  Olive oil is good, but not for high temperatures (especially the extra-virgin which my wife always buys).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 23 May 2012, 02:46
Just the other day my dad was telling me that all the common vegetable oils - sunflower, rape-seed, arachide - are extracted from the material using hexane. Olive oil is the only oil that is actually pressed. That surprised both of us.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Akima on 23 May 2012, 03:22
For frying I use rape-seed oil (is that canola in the US?), which has the additional benefit of being the cheapest!
It is certainly called canola oil in Australia, and an excellent, economical choice. Its smoke temperature is quite high which is important for good stir-fry.

Just the other day my dad was telling me that all the common vegetable oils - sunflower, rape-seed, arachide - are extracted from the material using hexane. Olive oil is the only oil that is actually pressed. That surprised both of us.
Peanut oil, which is very common in East and Southeast Asian cooking, was traditionally produced by cold pressing, and the best quality oil still is. Cheaper grades are produced using more "industrial" methods such as hot extraction, and finally extraction with solvents such as hexane is used. Frequently the same nut meal is passed through all three processes in succession to extract every last drop of oil. According to this article (http://www.ucm.es/info/improliv/allgem.htm) a similar multi-stage process is used for olive oil.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 23 May 2012, 06:12
Did someone say oats? Oats oats oats!   They are high in soluble fiber, which is good for scrubbing out your arteries. Also a bonus, they taste great! 

Also for whole grains I whole heatedly recommend wheat berries.  They are just whole wheat grains.  You can buy them in most health food sections.  You cook them like rice, but they take a bit more water and a bit longer (directions on the package).  I think they are so good, a bit chewy, nutty flavor, and filling.  I usually just eat them plain or with a little olive oil/butter and salt.  I also think they would be good sweet.  I am thinking something with honey and strawberries?  I'll be playing with them when fruit prices drop for summer.

Ooooh, those sound good! I love really nutty tasting grains.

I bought Smart Balance last week! It's tasty :-) I've used Olivio as well and I like it but it's hardly ever on sale. I don't typically use butter either- expensive and I always get annoyed with it because I forget to take it out of the fridge to let it soften before trying to use it as a spread. And yep- rape-seed is called canola here too :-) I alternate between using that and olive, depending on what I'm doing with it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 23 May 2012, 08:13
My older daughter developed a reaction to canola oil.  We call it an allergy, but some people say there are no allergens in oils.  Whatever.  It may be that straight rapeseed's poisonous, or the treatment they do to the oil to remove the toxins may be the problem. 

It came to a head when she was working at McDonalds and they changed the deep fryers to all-canola.  There was so much of it in the air, she'd break out in a rash just walking into the place. 

I thought it was a reaction to work for a little while, but she has violent digestive reactions whenever she eats anything with canola in it (rigorously tested, I'm afraid).  So we read labels like crazy. 

The damn stuff's everywhere...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 23 May 2012, 08:40
some people say there are no allergens in oils.

Idiots.  Try telling that to someone with a peanut allergy. 

Allergens are not a specific class of substances, they are substances to which people are allergic.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 23 May 2012, 09:54
I  was going to make shepherd's pie tonight, but then I realised that this heat will probably kill me if I spend any time in the kitchen, so I've put a crispbake in the oven and am trying out the vegetable steamer function on my rice cooker for the first time, using carrots and broad beans. I'm hoping the carrots cook properly, I can't bear raw carrots.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 23 May 2012, 11:52
Canada at some point become a huge supplier of rapeseed oil. It is supposed to be the best for cholesterol etc.. But had a PR problem due to being called RAPE SEED. Too rape-y. Hence CAN(ada)OLA.
My wife explained to me that the good olive oil is First Cold Pressed. Everything else is sloppy seconds. And may involved some heinous chemicals/heat to extract the the oil. We found a good vendor here in Charlotte. They import their own oil from Greece. (Minos) We pay $23 for 3L. Which is really good when you compare it to lesser products in little bottles at the grocery store. This place is dyn-0-mite. I got 1 lb of Feta Cheese (domestic) and 1 lb or Kalamata olives for $8.52 total the other day.
Sorry I did not take any pictures of the Korean BBQ I made last night. Awesome flavor. Still a bit tough. But I was pretty lit when I decided to eat it and went on it like a dang shark-a-gator. Also Kim Chee is the best thing right now for me. At some point I will probably tire of it though. Kind of pricey, but I'm too lazy to undertake making it myself.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 23 May 2012, 12:26
some people say there are no allergens in oils.

Idiots.  Try telling that to someone with a peanut allergy. 

Allergens are not a specific class of substances, they are substances to which people are allergic.

You can only be allergic to proteins I was told once by a medical professional.  Everything else is an intolerance.  I don't technically have a food allergy, just when I eat things with sulphites in them I get hives all over.

I'm sorry, if I eat it and have an adverse reaction that is clearly histamine based I am going to call it an allergy... I don't care if it is mediated by the wrong blood bit. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 23 May 2012, 12:45
Exactly. But. but. but. The Peanut Institute sez...
Quote
When peanut oil is correctly processed and becomes highly refined, the proteins in the oil, which are the components in the oil that can cause allergic reaction, are removed. This makes the peanut oil allergen-free!
So you won't die from peanut oil so long as everything goes 100% correct at the factory where we process it. What could POSSIBLY go wrong?   :-D <--(look it's president Carter)
I really feel for people with severe food allergies. Because as things become more processed and regulation becomes more "job creator" friendly <ahem> more people will be poisoned. My daughter recently went to a "Pizza party" at some other kids house. The mom actually said this: "Oh well they'll eat what we give them. If some other parent tells me their kid has peanut allergies I won't let them come over."
Nice.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 23 May 2012, 14:20
Some parents are just plain stupid/thoughtless/ignorant; a friend whose child has a peanut allergy went to a party, they were careful with the party food, but at the end handed each child a party bag including a snickers bar - oops!

You can only be allergic to proteins I was told once by a medical professional.  Everything else is an intolerance.

I can't find a reference that supports that definition.  Certainly the usage in the Merck Manual doesn't.  Of course, proteins are a common cause; but to the best of my knowledge, Penicillin, for instance, is not a protein, but a reaction to it is universally described as allergic.

Edit:  I was wrong; I know a little more now.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Akima on 23 May 2012, 14:56
We call it an allergy, but some people say there are no allergens in oils.
Some people are a waste of good oxygen.

So you won't die from peanut oil so long as everything goes 100% correct at the factory where we process it. What could POSSIBLY go wrong?
Yeah. If I had a peanut allergy, I would not risk it, especially when there are so many alternatives. Peanuts are not native to Asia, but were introduced in the 17th century by Portuguese traders. Now China produces 40+% of the world's total peanut crop, and consumes nearly all of it domestically, with most of it going to oil production. I have no idea if East and Southeast Asians are less prone to peanut allergies, but the oil especially is so ubiquitous that life would be really really tough if you were a sufferer.

Kimchi is excellent, but real kimchi should be fermented, so producing it at home would be a pain.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 23 May 2012, 17:16
You can only be allergic to proteins I was told once by a medical professional.  Everything else is an intolerance.
I can't find a reference that supports that definition.  Certainly the usage in the Merck Manual doesn't.  Of course, proteins are a common cause; but to the best of my knowledge, Penicillin, for instance, is not a protein, but a reaction to it is universally described as allergic.
Penicillin is made out of amino acids. How does that make it not a protein?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 23 May 2012, 17:37
Kimchi is excellent, but real kimchi should be fermented, so producing it at home would be a pain.
As late as the 1950s, wasn't kimchi mostly produced at home? Seems like college students who'd served in Korea would talk about it as a buried, fermenting container and definitely an acquired taste.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Akima on 23 May 2012, 17:41
As late as the 1950s, wasn't kimchi mostly produced at home?
Oh sure, if you're ready to have lots of large pots of fermenting kimchi around your place, there is nothing to stop you making it at home. If you have a garden, you could even bury the pots in the time-honoured fashion.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 23 May 2012, 17:42
I am going to a party thrown by a korean family next weekend. Now, I am told that the mother's an excellent cook. But I don't care how good they say it is oor how good the rest of the fod is, I am not eating kimchi
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 23 May 2012, 23:37
Penicillin is made out of amino acids. How does that make it not a protein?

I was wrong - sorry.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 24 May 2012, 02:58
Penicillin is made out of amino acids. How does that make it not a protein?

I was wrong - sorry.
No need to apologize. I think there's some merit to the idea that all allergens are proteins, seeing as all the components of organic life can be categorized as protein, far, or glucose-derivative. The latter two are hardly ever species-specific so there's no need to mount an immune response against them, if I understand correctly.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 24 May 2012, 03:41
I am going to a party thrown by a korean family next weekend. Now, I am told that the mother's an excellent cook. But I don't care how good they say it is oor how good the rest of the fod is, I am not eating kimchi
That right there is a dang ole shame. I hope they have some other things you enjoy though. I've really only eaten Korean at a few restaurants. 1 of which I will no longer go to as I got amazingly sick after visiting. The other is in the back of a small grocer and is wonderful. But it was better before they revamped it and made it into a "proper" restaurant with English speaking wait staff.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 24 May 2012, 06:19
I miss Korean food :-( There was a teeny tiny little take out place less than a block from FIT. I always ordered the bulgogi kimbob and bibimbap. It was simple but incredibly delicious. Now that I think about it I can't imagine that it's terribly difficult to make. Perhaps I'll give it a try!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 24 May 2012, 10:44
Also I'm pretty sure that's the cutest named food ever.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 24 May 2012, 11:24
hahah it really is. The name of the restaurant was cute too- Kofoo.  :-D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 24 May 2012, 20:51
Oh god, straight up Bulgogi is one of my favorite foods ever. I don't like it hot and spicy, though - nice and sweet is my preference, since I don't like anything spicy. We have a kickass recipe for it, if anyone wants it - it's pretty easy to make. having a nice cut of meat for it can make it a bit pricy, though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 25 May 2012, 06:07
Ooh, I would love it! I'll probably end up making it with a cheaper cut of meat and just marinating the hell out of it lol. Top round was on sale for SUPER cheap this week, so I grabbed a few steaks. Usually it's about $4-$5 per pound and it was $1.79. I got 2 decently sized steaks for only $6.50. Since it's just the two of us and I've been ordered to cut down my red meat intake, these should last a while.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 25 May 2012, 06:56
Yes, do share. I can always amp up the heat.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 25 May 2012, 08:09
Coolies, I'll ask Mom where the recipe is tonight. We usually prepare it using really thin strips of beef (Probably an 1/8" to 1/4" thick - not sure what the metric equivalent would be, unfortunately). It marinates overnight, and then it gets fried up in a wok the following day.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 25 May 2012, 08:37
ok, thanks. I tried something like that some nights ago. did the overnight marinade and it was still kind of tough. I grilled mine outside. Maybe did it too long, but was follow a recipe.
(http://media-cache2.pinterest.com/upload/203787951858892772_xpvsOkTG_f.jpg)
BLT with bacon fried potatoes, carrots, celery, onions in habanero vinegar.
also...
Dry rub went on this last night:
(http://media-cache6.pinterest.com/upload/203787951858892733_adB67sUP_f.jpg)

more-> http://pinterest.com/illicitizen/nom/
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 25 May 2012, 09:11
That's why the cut of meat is so important, I think... it keeps it from being tough.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 25 May 2012, 12:02
I wonder if it would work if you just cooked it niiiiice and slow.

Hmm.....I sense an experiment in my near future!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 27 May 2012, 14:30
(http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee282/omega_entity/BulgogiRecipe.jpg)

My mother tells me this recipe is authentic - my brother was adopted from Seoul, Korea when he was six months old, and they used to take him to a Korean picnic they held once a year in Chicago. The recipe comes from a small cookbook that they handed out there in 1981.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 27 May 2012, 19:10
I can't wait to try this! Thanks for the recipe :-)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 27 May 2012, 20:24
How small was that cook book?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 27 May 2012, 20:39
I can't wait to try this! Thanks for the recipe :-)
You're quite welcome :-)

Mister D - 6 recipes in total, 7 is you include the shrimp sauce. The rest has information on the various organizations for Korean-Americans at the time, as well as data pertaining to the highest concentration of Korean residents of Chicago by zip code - though I doubt that the information is still good, since it's from 1981.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 28 May 2012, 08:03
Great. I forget. Is "Accent" just the meat tenderizer? I have not seen it in years. If I recall it is mainly some plant extract and sodium. Like papaya or something. True story: EMT's in S Florida (at least used to) carry Accent in their drug boxes. It is a sure fire neutralizer for jellyfish and Portuguese man-o-war stings. In any event, this sounds great. I've saved it. Will try it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 28 May 2012, 08:08
Not meat tenderizer, MSG, monosodium glutamate, often used in Chinese cooking. The one link I googled to reminded me that it's not in great favor in the U.S.; some are allergic to it. I recall it could cause headaches. It's considered a flavor enhancer, adding none of its own.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 28 May 2012, 11:07
I'm not sure that we even use the accent - I'll have to ask Mom.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 28 May 2012, 11:15
Just asked her, it's MSG. We don't always use it in there.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 28 May 2012, 11:56
MSG is delicious and I'm really upset that so many places don't use it because people are weird about it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 28 May 2012, 12:52
I choose viet Fish Sauce instead of MSG. Definitely a flavor enhancer. And it doesn't make me feel icky. I'm pretty tolerant to toxins, pain meds, insect stings, land shark attacks, but MSG makes me feel not as good. It is ok in small doses, almost every prepared snack food has it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 29 May 2012, 12:41
I am going to make a mushroom and bacon quiche tomorrow. So excited!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Sorflakne on 29 May 2012, 16:32
Chili powder, onion powder, garlic powder and paprika.  All you need to make hamburgers taste amazing. 

And throw in a little oregano if you want to be fancy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 30 May 2012, 18:41
Today we had breaded pork chops, rice and vegetable. (mine where canned green beans which I love even though I know in my head they are mushy and gross).  Also there was apple sauce.
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-jjYArMUc_CA/T8a0bNSj68I/AAAAAAAABbA/2sPrZga5jx8/s817/IMG_20120530_195905.jpg)

Also, also, there was dessert.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Ji6lgtKgs64/T8bK8e7PWdI/AAAAAAAABbc/91AccMbb6dk/s817/IMG_20120530_213526.jpg)
Pound cake and strawberries with sugar so they get juicy.  This is the first pound cake I have ever made.  It is Delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Nikolai on 03 Jun 2012, 14:42
I'm morally and legally obligated (I think) to put in a plug for my wife's cooking blog. That aside, she's a pretty damn kickass cook.

http://www.starsstripesandspatulas.blogspot.com/ (http://www.starsstripesandspatulas.blogspot.com/)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 03 Jun 2012, 15:19
A lot of good-looking recipes there.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 03 Jun 2012, 16:24
Heck yeah. 'merican food!
 8-)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Akima on 03 Jun 2012, 20:55
I'm morally and legally obligated (I think) to put in a plug for my wife's cooking blog.
I endorse her recipe for "Veggie Chow Mein", except that oyster sauce is not vegetarian. You can get "vegetarian oyster sauce" that's made from mushrooms.

Incidentally, there were some postings earlier in the thread about MSG in Chinese food. If you have concerns about it, you should be careful about real oyster sauce, because it naturally contains a lot of glutamates, and cheap brands have MSG added to make up for containing less oyster.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 05 Jun 2012, 17:28
Oyster mushooms?
In any event y'all crock pot haterz can suck it. I put my collards in when I left for work. Came home to delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 06 Jun 2012, 14:12
This week the local supermarket was renovating until Wednesday, so when I went out for groceries at 7 PM on Monday I found they were closed. I got chinese take-out instead, and found that I could get three dinners, and then some, out of a pack of noodles and a pack of sate for €8.50. When I cook for myself I can only get two dinners out of that amount of money. I'm currently looking for reasons not to get take-out every week.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 06 Jun 2012, 14:32
Saturated fat, sodium, MSG, obesity, narrowing of the arteries, heart attacks.

Also, what are you cooking for yourself? If money is an issue, vegetables from a market rather than a supermarket are much cheaper, healthier, fresher and not going to kill you.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 06 Jun 2012, 14:35
Black refried beans and a sharp jack cheese. I my gas will be taxed as an energy source.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 12 Jun 2012, 11:33
Saturated fat, sodium, MSG, obesity, narrowing of the arteries, heart attacks.

Also, what are you cooking for yourself? If money is an issue, vegetables from a market rather than a supermarket are much cheaper, healthier, fresher and not going to kill you.
I hardly think any sort of vegetable is more likely to kill me than whatever processed foods they're already in. As for the rest, those are certainly some Reasons, though not particularly ones I think I need to worry too much about in this stage of this life, but Reasons nonetheless. I checked the bottles of soy sauce and oyster sauce I had in my cabinet, by the way, and neither had any MSG in it. At least that's good, right?

Tonight I had Chinese food anyway, though I made it myself from a recipe. One of the ingredients it required was some sort of Asian spice mix. I look at its ingredients: Water, onion, salt, pepper, preservatives. To hell with that, I got my own onion, salt and pepper, don't need those from a packet. The recipe was made with cooked noodles, with bacon, leek and onion, garnished with a hard-boiled egg, peanuts and spiced, ground coconut. Pretty good!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 Jun 2012, 11:45
That does sound good. I have never been brave enough to try Chinese recipes, because I've never seen anyone cooking Chinese food and feel like I'll mess it up.

I wasn't suggesting that vegetables of any kind would kill you, I was saying that they were more healthy than takeaway. And if you are sensible about those Reasons now, you won't have to worry about them as much in later life. If you aren't, you won't be able to avoid that worrying.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 13 Jun 2012, 09:45
Well, as long as you have a recipe, I don't see why you should be worried about messing up. I may not be much of a cook, but at the end of the day, after ignoring, substituting, adding and dividing ingredients, I'm still left with a pan of food that is much more edible now than when I started with it. The recipe told me to fry the bacon, remove it from the pan, fry the leek and spice mix in the bacon fat, and then add the bacon back. Didn't bother doing that and put the vegetables right in. Still tasted like bacon, so no problem.

Though of course I'm working from a recipe I picked off a stand in the supermarket that said it was Chinese, and actually cooking Chinese might be a whole other can of noodles.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 15 Jun 2012, 11:56
caaaaake.  I don't think these aren't great enough to revive the cake thread wherever it is but I made a cake and cupcakes this week.  They are for different events. 

A rainbow cake.  Before frosting and after.
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-XLtDDgD1hLk/T9rgNJ4yvzI/AAAAAAAABdw/kw6sRg-qX1k/s613/IMG_20120615_031114.jpg)
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-OKCgdeBXgH0/T9rz4JdmqDI/AAAAAAAABeE/RlxM1Gc1EkI/s613/IMG_20120615_043525.jpg)

and ball gag cupcakes
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-s4FPESIK75M/T9uEO8gaBoI/AAAAAAAABfQ/Vw3q-fdY53U/s817/IMG_20120615_145045.jpg)

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 15 Jun 2012, 13:20
Hello everyone! I have discovered a wonderful cooking blog. I urge you to check it out if you haven't come across it already:
http://www.cookingcomically.com/

Also, I made popovers a few days ago! They were fairly good. Unfortunately I lacked toppings (It was a spur of the moment occasion)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 17 Jun 2012, 11:18
Kat, I could not be more relieved that you clarified that the 4 year old birthday cake and the ball gag cupcakes were not for the same event.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 17 Jun 2012, 12:08
The cake cut open. 
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-jjwkXgGzi3k/T90YOAZ0ZCI/AAAAAAAABfc/MORZk6WmOHs/s613/IMG_20120616_193021.jpg)

squeeeee.  I am so excited by how this turned out.  I want to make another one.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 17 Jun 2012, 12:35
Oooooh! I don't think I've ever squeeed before, but I'll squee for this!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 18 Jun 2012, 06:08
That looks awesome!!  :-)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 24 Jun 2012, 23:05
Midnight alfredo is the best alfredo. Even though I am a zombie from taking a nap too late.

I should probably elaborate more, but I am too goddamn tired
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 25 Jun 2012, 00:10
The trouble I have is making my food look good. Being the last week of living in my house, I made food with what I had left. Three frozen pollock fillets, a box of chopped tomatoes, garlic, a reasonable amount of red lentils, some red onions, some red cooking wine. Weirdly, it tasted good, but it really was the closest looking thing to vomit that I think I've ever created. To eat, that is.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 25 Jun 2012, 05:30
Whenever I want food o look good, I add some vegetables to the plate
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 27 Jun 2012, 11:53
Howdy reliable internet friends,

After a period during which my cooking was sharply limited by what foods I had on hand I suddenly have a food budget.  Food was pretty boring, particularly as I ran out of key ingredients (yeast!) which cut out whole categories of food which are usually made in this house (pizza!).  This new freedom to buy ingredients has filled me with an urge to cook.  Just everything! All the time! MAKE IT! 

So, what should I make?  We have a bit of aid built up, because it starts from the day you apply, not the day you are approved. This means I can afford to spend some money, but because we actually need this aid to eat, it has to give me a food outcome worth the investment.  What I mean is, I will not spend 25 dollars on caviar, but I could conceivably do so on a huge hunk of meat, because it would make enough meals to justify that much money.  I would rather have ideas that are pretty inexpensive though. 

I am a reasonably competent cook and baker, so I have no problem with ideas that are a bit of a challenge.  Also I am unemployed (hence this situation) so things that are time intensive are also ok.

So far I am going to make:
Bagels
Ice cream
I was going to can some pickles too maybe, but that depends how the cucumbers look at the market this Saturday

What else should I tackle?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 27 Jun 2012, 11:59
As a broad general idea, I'd recommend if you have a larger sum of money now than you will have in future getting very large quantities of non-perishable things. Asian stores often sell huge bags of rice for tiny prices, for instance.

I'm a big fan of risottos, and you can put all manner of different vegetables and flavourings in them to ring the changes. It doesn't freeze once cooked but it's pretty easy and quick to cook. I always try to have two or three portions of risotto rice in, because it's a great dish when people drop in unexpectedly.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 27 Jun 2012, 13:24
I have a trip (tentatively) planned to a bulk baking supply store this Saturday.  We are buying a huge bag of flour, sugar and some large quantity of yeast.  We cook a lot from scratch and so these are our staples.  We also are getting rice, bulk dried beans and I have started buying some canned goods that are on sale to replenish our supply. 

Today I made mini quiches.  I was invited to someone's house and this is my "dish to share". 
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-OPPnYTjznaA/T-trb1Q6-1I/AAAAAAAABh8/9qlNKToOCVo/s817/IMG_20120627_162143.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 27 Jun 2012, 13:42
Do you have a recipe for those mini quiches?

I suggest you make some seafood. I once had a really good curry with some kind of fish. I quite liked it. Lamb's good too, especially if it's a really good cut

As for baking kind of stuff you could make a souffle. And pies. I really like baking fruit pies around this time of year

Unfortunately, I don't know about stuff that you can keep for a long time... Although you can try your hand at making homemade jam/jelly/preserves. It's tasty and goes great on all kinds of breakfast stuff.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 27 Jun 2012, 14:24
Those look AMAZING.

I'm trying to find a recipe to try out my KitchenAid. My mum bought it for my 21st birthday but it lives at her house because it's too expensive and special to leave at uni (I'd either have to leave it in the kitchen at the mercy of my corridormates, or lug it back and forth and break my back) so I haven't used it yet. We'd have to cook reasonably late in the evening so I need something quick, ie not bread!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 27 Jun 2012, 16:38
What else should I tackle?
You didn't say how much refrigerator/freezer space you have. That might help with suggestions.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 27 Jun 2012, 22:38
Do you have a recipe for those mini quiches?

I feel like we had a pie crust discussion recently, but I can't find it.
Crust:
2 1/4 C flour
1/2 cup butter
1/2 cup shorting
1/2 cup ice water

cut the fats into the flour until it looks like crumbs then mix in the water slowly until it just holds together. 

Then I press little balls of crust into mini muffin pans poke them with a fork and blind bake at 350 ish until they start to set.  15 min maybe?
The filling is cooked broccoli, gruyere cheese and bacon. Then the egg stuff

3 eggs
1 1/2 cups cream
salt, pepper, nutmeg, cayenne

put in a bit of each thing and bake at 350 until they are set. 

I'm trying to find a recipe to try out my KitchenAid.
I mostly use my Kitchen Aid to make frosting, whipped cream, anything with beaten egg whites or large quantities of mashed potatoes.
Are you looking for a meal? If not, angel food cake with whipped cream (and fresh fruit) would be a good thing that makes good use of that motor instead of your arm. :)

You didn't say how much refrigerator/freezer space you have. That might help with suggestions.
A bit of fridge space, not a ton of freezer space and oooodles of pantry space.  I was more looking for creative things to make to eat in the short term than things to make and save up. Things that are fun to make, but which take too much time/effort to make regularly from scratch (and which don't call for too many crazy single use ingredients, bearing in mind I cook a lot, so unless something is really specialized I'll use it). 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 28 Jun 2012, 03:57
My favorite recipes are Bob's Arrogantly Superior Guacamole, tandoori chicken with an utterly simple recipe done on a charcoal or gas grill and fake Krab California rolls, also utterly simple (nori from a market near you).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 28 Jun 2012, 06:22
Can you use coupons alongside your aid? What grocery stores are near you? My best advice for spending the extra funds is to stretch it as far as humanly possible, that way you can still maintain the ability to buy "treats" 6 months from now.  I follow http://www.livingrichwithcoupons.com/ (LRWC) and they post previews of the grocery store circulars as well as "matchups", so you can see what coupons go with what sales. This past week, I managed to snag 6 tubs of Smart Balance spreads for $2.40. Less than the regular price of one. I use that stuff instead of actual butter because I'm watching my cholesterol but it's usually too expensive. Now, I won't need to buy the stuff for another 6-8 months. And by then, it'll probably be on sale again. This was a better week for dairy than for pantry items, but that's not typically the case. It's not rare for me to snag 10 boxes of pasta for less than a buck. And there are a few things I never pay for (aside from the coupon cost)- panty liners, toothpaste, bottled iced tea,


Couponing isn't for everyone but it might be worth getting into since you have some extra time on your hands.


It's also REALLY easy when you use the internet to help. It only takes me about a half hour to prep for my grocery trip. I go on LRWC, take a peek at the preview ad, go to Dede's coupon clipping service (http://www.couponsthingsbydede.com/) and order whatever coupons I need. It's SO much easier than cutting them all out of the newspaper and ending up wasting a bunch of coupons since not all of them match up to good deals. I typically spend $4 a week on coupons and each week I make that $4 back from saving between $75- $100 at the grocery store.

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 28 Jun 2012, 08:30
I got this recipe for meatloaf from a friend and I made it last night and it is SO FREAKING GOOD.

Quote
bitchin' meatloaf recipe

ingredients:
2 eggs beaten
3/4 cup of milk
2/3 cup fine dry bread crumbs (i prefer italian, but plain is fine too)
1/4 cup finely chopped onion
2 tbls chopped fresh parsley (you can also use dried)
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp of each: sage, basil, oregano (i also like a bit of ground thyme)
1/8 tsp black pepper (or more to your taste)
1/2 lb of each: ground beef, ground pork, pork sausage ( i use hot but you can use mild if you don't want it as spicy)
4-5 strips of bacon, cut in half
1/4 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons brown sugar ( i prefer dark but light s ok)
1 tsp dry mustard (can also use any wet mustard but i just eyeball it for the right consistency and taste)
optional red pepper flakes i usually use about 1/2 tbsp but i like it with more heat.

Directions:
1. Combine eggs and milk in a med to large bowl. Stir in bread crumbs, onion, parsley, salt, and other herbs and spices. Add meat and mix well, I prefer to use my hands in order to get a good even mix. Pat into a 8x4x2 in loaf pan or into a 9x13 baking dish and form into loaf shape. Cover loaf with strips of bacon.

2. Bake at 350 for 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Spoon off fat. Combine ketchup, brown sugar and mustard. I usually mix to taste I tend to like a bit more brown sugar and a thicker sauce but you can play with it to get the ratio right. I also usually make a bit more sauce than the recipe calls for I like extra for dipping. Spread sauce over meatloaf and bake 10-15 minutes more. Let stand 10-15 minutes before serving.

It's supposed to make about 8 servings, but I would say closer to 5? But I like this meatloaf a lot, so I usually take large pieces. :evil: And she usually makes a double batch (in which case you double everything). Also extra sauce, because I didn't make it and kind of regretted it because the sauce is just so freaking good with it. So if you want to try a sweet and spicy meatloaf, try this out!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 28 Jun 2012, 12:49
We're not trying out my KitchenAid after all :( Too much hassle getting it out of the cupboard apparently. I'll have to wait another year.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 28 Jun 2012, 12:53
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/540814_4237436336975_1356192919_n.jpg)

Bacon wrapped chicken with gravy, simple but yummy. Was gonna make mash but forgot to get potatoes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 02 Jul 2012, 09:47
I got this recipe for meatloaf from a friend and I made it last night and it is SO FREAKING GOOD.

Quote
bitchin' meatloaf recipe
The best one I ever made was ground beef and 2 huge and thick country ham steaks diced.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 02 Jul 2012, 13:47
If you like lamb, and you can tolerate/like feta cheese, this recipe is fantastic! It doesn't have to be rack of lamb - shoulder or chops work just as well. I really like feta, so I make the 'breading' of mine with more feta than it calls for.

(http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee282/omega_entity/Feta-CrustedLambrecipe.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 02 Jul 2012, 16:04
I'm definitely trying the lamb recipe!

Did a wicked-easy carbonara the other day. No cream, just 3 eggs mixed with parmesan for the sauce - got a whole box of mushrooms, the remainder of some cooking bacon, a red onion and a few cloves of garlic in the pan whilst you heat up some spaghetti. Once the spaghetti is cooked, quickly dump into the egg mixture (it cooks whilst the pasta is hot) and once this is mixed, dump into the pan of goodies. I added some peas to mine, and figured out that due to the strong taste of parmesan, it is probably best to season the sauce, rather than the meat/pan ingredients, to get some proper flavour going on.

Takes about 15 minutes to make, easy!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 02 Jul 2012, 16:31
Today we made pickles!
only 3 jars because that is all the jars we had and so I didn't buy a lot of cucumbers.  My boyfriend's wife said she has extra canning jars I can have, so next week I will be making more.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-UsmpL8K8Ztw/T_C127qUKAI/AAAAAAAABis/CLC0eBWiIf0/s735/IMG_20120701_164046.jpg)

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/--cg9RAcIOB8/T_Iu3MyEuUI/AAAAAAAABi4/zVIFj7m85jY/s735/IMG_20120702_192914.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 02 Jul 2012, 17:06
Double post!

Dinner: Purslane stuffed chicken, fresh peas and egg noodles.  Thanks to Michigan's "Double up food bucks" program which give you double food stamps when you use them at farmer's markets to buy local produce, the peas are fresh, and the purslane was actually grown within Detroit city limits. Awsome!

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-vwYl62Mgl3E/T_I1_oAxmzI/AAAAAAAABjM/UR1HnNQFUOU/s735/IMG_20120702_195936.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 02 Jul 2012, 20:00
Double Plus Good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 03 Jul 2012, 01:45
I don't even eat chicken and that looks amazing.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 03 Jul 2012, 05:02
"Double up food bucks" program which give you double food stamps when you use them at farmer's markets to buy local produce

This is pretty cool! Also that looks delicious.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 03 Jul 2012, 08:06
How do you make pickles? I knew it's the same thing as cucumbers but I have no idea how you get from one to the other.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 03 Jul 2012, 09:08
There are a few things you can do to do to cucumbers that get them called pickles. 

I make dill pickles and the process is:

Wash and cut cucumbers
Soak them in salt water for 12 hours (photo one)
Make a brine of vinegar, salt and spices
Add dill, garlic and mustard seed to the jars
Add cucumbers and brine to fill
Boil the jars to seal them
Wait (second photo)


Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 03 Jul 2012, 14:15
Today was less hot, but you wouldn't know it from my kitchen.

Bagels!
This was my first time making them and man did the kneading give me a workout.  It is high gluten dough and it needs 10 solid minutes of kneading.  I was dripping sweat by the end.  Also I am not very good at making them shaped like bagels.

A boiling
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-f599JCUJd9s/T_NZHlP62nI/AAAAAAAABlM/9zZhHaCxTDs/s619/IMG_20120703_164149.jpg)

Ready to bake
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-yoKJTcWy_4w/T_NZkqATniI/AAAAAAAABlc/Uxzds6UEVWM/s619/IMG_20120703_164348.jpg)

All done!
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-BIwUz8dThqE/T_NdFvKU-aI/AAAAAAAABlw/zS77jR_rEK0/s551/IMG_20120703_165848.jpg)

Dinner pics coming later....
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 03 Jul 2012, 15:13
Dinner!

Swai with lemon and dill, purslane with garlic and gruyere cheese and rice.

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-ON4upzPGywo/T_NiQ5gsO5I/AAAAAAAABm0/IyT4NTuGunE/s735/IMG_20120703_172053.jpg)

Turns out Steve likes purslane which is awesome because he is not fond of most vegetables.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 03 Jul 2012, 16:53
Where do you get the swai? And the purslane? The wikipedia entry for purslane makes it look quite nutritious, and interesting that it has a different taste depending on what part of the day it's harvested.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 03 Jul 2012, 17:16
How do you make pickles? I knew it's the same thing as cucumbers but I have no idea how you get from one to the other.

You can pickle just about anything! Last year we made carrot sweet pickles, and some awesome summer squash sweet pickles - the summer squash ones were my favorite out of the bunch.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 03 Jul 2012, 17:51
I got the swai at Kroger.  The best thing about Swai is it is cheap.  That filet was a dollar. 

The puslane I got at Eastern Market, though the market in Ypsi has it too.  I had never seen it for sale in New York, but I used to eat it out of the yard when I was little since it grows as a weed.  I always ate young purslane as a salad green, these last two meals are my first experience cooking it and I think I will be buying it all summer.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 03 Jul 2012, 18:08
Don't know where I'd find purslane in Hillsdale County unless I learn to recognize it in the wild. My wife taught me to like catfish, but we never fixed it at home. For that price, I should check Kroger. My favorite fish are tilapia in pork shake'n'bake on a griddle and salmon on a gas grill with honey mustard.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 03 Jul 2012, 18:18
Swai is mild like talapia but, um, meatier maybe? It would take well to shake-n-bake.

If you have a garden you most likely have purslane in it. 

(http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nursery-weeds/weedspeciespage/common_purslane/habit_2_750.jpg)

It looks like that growing, it creeps along the ground but only has one central stem, so it is easy to pull up.  Reddish stems with dark green leaves.



Also, I think I want to make empanadas. Does anyone have a good recipe? Right now I am just poking about online but if someone has one that is tested that would be awesome.  I am thinking of a beef and onion filling or maybe chicken. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 03 Jul 2012, 18:53
Wow, I've grown/sold portulaca (purslane) as an ornamental. There are varieties that have the brightest little flowers. Yeah, you can get Swai at Wal-Mart in NC. I had no idea what purslane was. Neat. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 03 Jul 2012, 18:54
I think I used to pull it out of my tiny lawn in Ferndale before I retired. It may be what's growing between my pavers out here.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 04 Jul 2012, 09:05
Hot fruity paste condiment, marinade, grilling rub... going into production this Fall.
GUAVA LAVA http://on.fb.me/0WwH0t
It is actually pretty good in a PBJ as the J too.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 05 Jul 2012, 18:00
Double Farty Pail Post.
Bul.go.gi!
(http://media-cache-ec8.pinterest.com/upload/203787951859125898_7CizAfdN_b.jpg)
-
(http://media-cache-ec4.pinterest.com/upload/203787951859125904_2lciN7Ya_b.jpg)
-
(http://media-cache-ec0.pinterest.com/upload/203787951859125909_Pt3yutmd_b.jpg)
-
(http://media-cache-ec6.pinterest.com/upload/203787951859125923_DHWgGXVp_b.jpg)
-
(http://media-cache-ec6.pinterest.com/upload/203787951859125933_LpUXaj4k_f.jpg)
-
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-H3aDq0esOgk/T_Y4axtcRBI/AAAAAAAACVI/_Ze_UxDTiUs/s519/2012-07-05)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 05 Jul 2012, 18:51
Mmmm, that looks awesome! I have been super lazy about cooking anything that isn't boring. probably because my kitchen is ridiculously hot and i don't like the idea of sweating in my food. (eww. sorry.)

Although- I did make french toast tonight. About as adventurous as I got lately. Used almond extract instead of vanilla. Mmmmmmm. With some turkey bacon on the side. Admittedly, not as tasty as full guilt bacon, but I'm trying to behave a little.

I found a recipe for french toast crusted in almonds and that sounded equally amazing, but my almonds were not of the solid variety.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 08 Jul 2012, 14:39
After a week of temperatures so hot I didn't want to cook anything, the heat finally broke.  We celebrated by making blueberry jam.

Smash
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Z3j43Nf9FkE/T_n80ZaIa1I/AAAAAAAABqQ/lmo94MWfstw/s549/IMG_1355.JPG)

Measure
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-IsMioHbvxmg/T_n80vZATTI/AAAAAAAABqY/9DkAE-tjzOo/s549/IMG_1356.JPG)

Cook
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-XJnRodnj2jA/T_n82JBXtAI/AAAAAAAABqw/YQNoJEn5oH8/s549/IMG_1360.JPG)

Jar
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-TfcYZfBNVAA/T_n83MMa6GI/AAAAAAAABrA/LdGhLRvUTFo/s549/IMG_1361.JPG)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 08 Jul 2012, 14:41
I don't think I've ever seen a knife block with so many knives in.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 08 Jul 2012, 15:13
There's a knife for that... :)

They knife block and the knives were a gift from my father for our wedding.  It was a really thoughtful gift.  He knew I like to cook, but didn't have any good knives.  He researched online and read reviews for each type of knife and bought the best of each kind that he could afford.  I have some really nice knives.  (a Henckels, a few wusthof, an F. Dick, two Shun...)

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-o9Btw8e-XEI/T_oFYoo2SAI/AAAAAAAABrw/6bO7kuYX6mk/s412/IMG_20120708_181003.jpg)

I have 8 steak knives, 4 paring knives (two ceramic and two steel), three chef knifes, two carving knives, a boning knife a bread knife, a "sandwich" knife, a cleaver, kitchen shears and a sharpening steel.  I love them so much, but sometimes I think I should go take a knife skills class, because such nice knives are a little wasted on me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 08 Jul 2012, 15:31
There's a knife for that... :)
 I love them so much, but sometimes I think I should go take a knife skills class, because such nice knives are a little wasted on me.
Me too. When it comes down to it, my $7 cleaver is my favorite implement. Mostly I use it as a garlic pulverizer.
So, sing it w/ me...I'm cookin' chicken tonight...
ahem.
I have a pack of thighs (w/ skin + bones) marinading in coconut milk, my special habanero paste, some sesame oil, aand a little rice vinegar. Theyve been in that for 6 hours or so. The grill is fired up. I was just going to start them on the grill and bake to finish. But it is so [email protected]$^2q hot that (no a/c) I think I'll just complete on the grill. Side dish will be couscous cooked in the marinade with the addition of some dried seaweed I'm soaking. This was a cute little package of stuff but I've soaked too much as it has super-swelled up. I'll retain some and use it for something else. Oh and I have some leftover green beans I need to eat or pitch. I'll take a pic of it isn't totally gross.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 09 Jul 2012, 06:45
Last night was a giant mish mash of stuff I had lying around and it was actually REALLY tasty!

I had a few boxes of the Betty Crocker Suddenly Pasta Salad- chipotle ranch flavor. I really wasn't in the mood to put in much effort but I wanted something hearty. Took 2 boxes of pasta salad mix, a can of kidney beans, a cup of chopped tomato, about a pound of steak strips, some chili powder, a packet of Sazon and a few dashes of Tabasco and mixed it all together. Topped it with some shredded cheddar and some crispy onions, served it with some steamed corn on the cob.

It was not pretty, but it tasted damn good. I don't even want to think about how unhealthy it was, but it was about time for a treat. :-)

Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 Jul 2012, 08:16
ok, the chicken was surprisingly bland.
(http://assets4.pinimg.com/upload/203787951859148491_xY5qfgZc_c.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 09 Jul 2012, 08:21
That sucks :-( I was hoping you'd have good news to report back. I love coconut, was thinking of trying it in part of a marinade myself. What do you think you'd do differently next time?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 Jul 2012, 12:15
Oh, I think I should put the lime in the coconut... :P
And a bigger dollop of my habanero death ray paste. And crikey, I'm usually too light with the salt. This was definitely the case.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 09 Jul 2012, 12:19
Goofing off with some frozen chicken breast tenders and homemade pseudo-catalina drassing. I say pseudo because I just kind of guesstimated on the amounts, and although it tasted suspiciously related to the dressing, it's kind of different, and I hope it works well because the chicken is currently baking in it  :-D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 09 Jul 2012, 12:24
So anyone else here ever used foreman grills (or any other kinds)? I hate cooking meet on them. They are pretty decent at heating up sandwiches or quesadillas though
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 09 Jul 2012, 12:39
I use one purely for convenience, not flavor. I have a gas grill just outside a door .... and as I think about it, I should use it for some of the things I put on the foreman. One of my favorites on the foreman is a couple of links of mild Italian sausage, slit on opposite sides, placed on the grill and pushing down hard to flatten them. When browned, I put them in toasted wheat pita pockets, with raw onion and honey mustard.
Damn! Maybe I've already described this. Oh well....
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 09 Jul 2012, 14:58
I can see it with hotdogs and sausages, but with steak, I just can't eat it at all. Why have something as good as steak and waste it with a george foreman? I would rather use it for chicken. Still not as good as anything else, but I don't feel cheated.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 09 Jul 2012, 15:24
I am not sure how cooking a steak on a George Foreman is wasting it.  It cooks with a high, dry heat right? like a grill or a cast iron skillet? how else would you cook one and how is the George Foreman different really?

I know that a lot of college students used them to make burgers and grilled cheese in dorms because they don't have an exposed element and so were up to the fire code.  I don't know if this is still true though.  I imagine they have banned them by now.



Also:
Stephen made pizza, as he frequently does.

Before
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-KjkI7NcK66M/T_tc1yzFuvI/AAAAAAAABss/gRhNYMnsOx8/s549/IMG_20120709_183517.jpg)

After
(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-IFb1IeDA7E8/T_tfrGmXiWI/AAAAAAAABs4/nNBbMHZtBjk/s549/IMG_20120709_184724.jpg)

mmmm, so good.


Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 09 Jul 2012, 16:08
George Foreman grills are the only (absolutely only - not even a microwave) cooking appliance provided at several of the colleges here.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 09 Jul 2012, 16:08
So anyone else here ever used foreman grills (or any other kinds)? I hate cooking meet on them. They are pretty decent at heating up sandwiches or quesadillas though

I love making burgers and dogs on my foreman but the stupid thing is such a pain in the ass to clean. If there was a way to clean it without it taking forever, I'd probably use it more often.

I've never made steak on it before. I usually cook steaks up nice and slow so they're fall-apart tender and I just don't see that happening on a foreman lol. Although- sometimes I like to fry up strips in a skillet, it might be good for that. Or for cooking up those paper thin strips for steak sandwiches?

And yes, Kat- high and dry. And on an angle so the fats drip out and away. I wasn't allowed one in my dorm.  :-(
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 09 Jul 2012, 16:23
My similar but cheaper grill is not sloped, but the fat still drains out.  The plates which press against the food unclip trivially easily, and are easy to clean, or even simply put in the dishwasher.  It does fish nicely, and browns chicken OK - I often use it for chicken sate, for instance.  But it is simply not hot enough to do steak rare - with a burnt outside but not fully cooked inside.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 09 Jul 2012, 16:41
I have one like PWHodges. But the dishwasher seems to take the teflon off. I'm on my second and would not replace for this reason. I did like throwing frozen chicken breasts on it and having something good when too drunk to make more involved food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 09 Jul 2012, 16:45
I am not sure why exactly I don't like the foreman grill for steak. I always have my steak medium, maybe medium rare. But what I get off a grill on good days is barely comparable to getting it off of a foreman grill. It really is the texture I hate the most. The taste isn't great eiter, but the texture is completely ruined.

Or it could be something else entirely. Maybe I don't like steak unless it is cooked directly using fossil fuels like gas or coal.  Though I think I can see why others are okay with steaks on foreman grills, I am just very picky with how steaks are cooked. However, when it comes down to what kind of steak I am eating it really doesn't matter. I know basic differences Steaks with bones in them I know, and I know some other cuts.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 09 Jul 2012, 16:46
The  Italian sausage is the best use for my foreman. Chicken breasts follow. Pork chops are so-so and beef isn't worth the bother. As to cleaning: After the grill is unplugged, I put a doubled paper towel on the lower element, either soaking it first or pouring water on the paper once it's in place. I let it soak while it cools, then take another paper towel wadded up and wipe off top and bottom elements. It almost always cleans up easily and quickly. The soaking, of course, would make it even easier to clean the elements in the sink, but I don't usually think to do that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 10 Jul 2012, 09:36
I do something similar, but it feels like I use so many more paper towels! I wish mine could come apart but I think because I have a smaller version, they don't detach. (yet another reason that what I cook is limited- size constraints) My issue is with all the little nooks and crannies that the grease gets trapped in. I waste so much time cleaning those.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 10 Jul 2012, 09:55
If it's wet, the drippings clean up easily with a paper towel. Thinking about this conversation, last night I detached the upper and lower plates, put them in the sink and cleaned them with one of those plastic cleaning pads with the reservoir of detergent behind it, then stood them up in the sink to drip dry.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 10 Jul 2012, 18:56
Pretzel bread stuffed with ham and cheese and broccoli...

(https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-oW-J1lcZVWQ/T_zSrqXJvQI/AAAAAAAABts/CQFTdbwLAWM/s568/IMG_20120710_211022.jpg)

It wasn't as amazing as I hoped.  It was still good, but I might poke around for another pretzel recipe.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 22 Jul 2012, 07:28
Dang that looks good Papersatan.

I fried up 6 strips of fatback this morning. With a diced onion, black/red pepper. Then I browned 4 chicken thighs in that cast iron skillet after removing the fb and onion. The pork fat/onion went in the crock with a lb of white beans I soaked overnight. As the chicken browned I added some saffron, cumin, a little salt and pepper. Then I poured a can of tomatoes (diced) over the thighs. Then I put the pan in the oven at 325 deg F. Gonna let it simmer for a while.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 22 Jul 2012, 09:20
That bread looks really nice. I need to buy some cooking utensils.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 25 Jul 2012, 17:16
(http://media-cache-ec7.pinterest.com/upload/203787951859264949_JojSGXoo_f.jpg)
Been beating my meat, and now I have a dry rub on it.


What?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 26 Jul 2012, 05:38
I made corn fritters last night! They were AWESOME and super easy/cheap. Yay!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 27 Jul 2012, 09:41
I decided to try out a new recipe yesterday, from a vegetarian recipe e-book (so handy to have it on my kindle!). It was chickpeas in spicy tomato sauce, and I improvised a little because the recipe was for a slow cooker and called for all kinds of fresh herbs, but I was using the stove top and a dried mixed herb tub. It turned out great, and Edith liked it too. The leftovers are for lunch, although I've got at least another two hours before I can go back and eat them, boo.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 28 Jul 2012, 04:24
(https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/s720x720/378296_4385397755918_989424071_n.jpg)

Sheperd's pie! I didn't want to put cheese on it but my boyfriend wanted it and he grated it. Think it might have been a little too much but it was yummy. Also made about six portions so we're getting two more dinners out of it.
Simple recipes but the first time I've done a meal without practice-cooking it with my Mammy first.

I wanna do tuna steaks some night. All I can think to do with it is garlic butter or pepper sauce, but pepper sauce involves buying alcohol. Any suggestions? My boyfriend insists he doesn't like fish but we've got him to try tuna steaks and he liked it. He's agreed if I make it, he'll try it for dinner.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 28 Jul 2012, 07:12
OK, I know shepeherd's pie, but what are the toasty brown sticks?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 28 Jul 2012, 09:08
Croquettes. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croquette) Those ones specifically just have mash potato in them and were store-bought. Good for soaking up gravy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 28 Jul 2012, 09:56
I really want shepard's pie now...

But I think I'll wait for winter, it's way too hot out for me to eat anything with that much potato and gravy.

Along with that, another item on my winter cooking list is a good stew. The closest I ever get to making that is making chili.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 29 Jul 2012, 07:10
I can only think of one of my mother's many failed attempts to make a new recipe.  She tried turkey croquettes once with thanksgiving leftovers. 


As a result, I have never actually had croquettes of any sort. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 29 Jul 2012, 09:50
You should get them, even frozen store-bought and oven cook them. I love them. Especially as an alternative to chips (fries) or roasties. Been eating so many chips since I moved out.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 29 Jul 2012, 16:29
Croquettes with dinner? As an ingredient? That's novel. Around here, they're most commonly eaten as snacks or a fast lunch, like spring rolls, or eaten on a bun like a meatball. You can get them in any snackbar in the country. Eating them as a substitute to potatoes would be unthinkable, given their reputation for being bad for your health, like most fast food.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Welu on 30 Jul 2012, 03:58
I was introduced to them as a side dish. I think they could be compared to chips with health, in how they're prepared, since they can be baked instead of deep fried. At least that's how my Mammy would make them from scratch. Can't get around them being mostly carbs but some days you want that.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 30 Jul 2012, 05:52
They sound awesome. Love me some carbs!  :-P
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 30 Jul 2012, 06:38
I can see those being a good way to use up leftover mashed potatoes. I've had some prepared that way before and they're not bad! Kind of want to try a potato, bacon, and cheese version.

I cooked mush (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mush_(cornmeal)) for the first time yesterday for breakfast - it was pretty good! Not the most healthy thing in the world, considering it's fried in butter and then covered with maple syrup, but it was a decent substitute for pancakes. I am also still working on perfecting a home fries recipe... The first time I used red potatoes w/ onion, peppers, paprika, garlic, pepper, and a little salt and the flavor was perfect, but the potatoes would not cook through for whatever reason. This time I used yukon gold, but didn't have any onions or peppers and while the texture was great, the flavor was bland. So, hopefully the third time will be the charm?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 30 Jul 2012, 10:57
Mush is better (and less healthy) when fried in bacon grease. 


But then again, what isn't? 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 30 Jul 2012, 12:25
Well I was going to make bacon, but it was moldy.

Yes, moldy bacon. Didn't know it could happen and it kind of scared me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: doombilly on 30 Jul 2012, 12:39
ok, in prep for leaving this house; I'm cleaning out my freezer. Tomorrow I grill for the week. What's left:
4 pre-made hamburger patties
2.3 lbs of boneless pork chops.
Ugh, it is so hot. I guess I'll be eating the various bean soups for lunch that I've got frozen.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Aimless on 12 Aug 2012, 05:19
I needed egg-whites so I invented the following in order to have something to do with the yolks. Served this as dessert last night after a barbecue, was om nom nom.

Take 4 egg-yolks and whisk them with an electric egg-beater (or, better, in one of those kitchenaid-like things) while slowly adding sugar, about 0.5 dl or maybe a little more, until it's all pale and fluffy and looks like cake-batter.

Heat 0.5-1 dl of cream+milk (not whipping cream, more like 15%) in a double-boiler setup with cinnamon, cardamom and vanilla. You can skip the real vanilla and use vanilla/vanillin powder instead. Remove the spices and then add about 100g of nice dark chocolate (I use 70%, you can use 80% or greater but I think it dominates the other flavours too much), mix it all together as the chocolate melts. If it gets wonky just let it cool for a while and then whisk it together thoroughly. Beat the gloop into the egg mixture bit by tiny bit. Add some champagne or similarly flavoured bubbly, like 0.5dl or so. Pour into 4 or 5 cups or whatever (I used round-bottomed whisky-tumblers) and let them sit in the freezer for a few hours. Eat with sliced strawberries and coffee or some suitable booze :o

You can forego the bubbly in which case the end result will be more dense and chocolatey.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 15 Aug 2012, 07:36
I, on the other hand, have some egg-whites left over from making tiramisu, so I'm going to make some meringues. There was a recipe for them in a magazine somewhere, let's see if I can find it...

The tiramisu didn't turn out so well, the mascarpone and egg yolks didn't stiffen properly so it was all a bit wet. Still tasty, though.

Well I was going to make bacon, but it was moldy.

Yes, moldy bacon. Didn't know it could happen and it kind of scared me.
I got that once as well, and just recently I found a patch of mold on some smoked salmon that had been in the fridge for some time. Generally, if food is slightly moldy it doesn't have to be spoiled, you can just scrape off the moldy bits and it'll be good for eating. Cheese and pesto are some of the things that can get a bit of mold on of them, but are still good to eat. It might go for bread too, but I've found that even though it's edible after getting rid of the mold, the taste still pervades a bit, so I usually throw it out.

Meat and fish products, however, are often fatty and not very friendly to molds in general, but what you do get on those are little growths of bacterial colonies. They're much harder to spot than mold, given that they're often transparent. The salmon I mentioned also had small colourless blobs on it, which were much more numerous than the mold, so once you find mold on your meat, it's definitely way past its expiration date, given that it's probably rife with bacteria as well. Though I think that, outside of meat products, bacterial growths occur only very rarely.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 15 Aug 2012, 08:54
Yeah, I don't really care if I find mold on cheese, because, well, it's cheese, but everything else gets tossed. My stomach is delicate enough and I don't want to make my body angry by accidentally ingesting something I'm allergic to. Like I won't even drink or cook with milk the day after the sell by date. I was just surprised by the bacon because we didn't even have it that long, but I think it's because I had it wrapped in saran wrap instead of in an air tight bag or container. And the saran wrap we have is really crappy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 15 Aug 2012, 14:50
Along with that, another item on my winter cooking list is a good stew. The closest I ever get to making that is making chili.

Take some cheap cuts of meat*, cut into bite sized peices and coat them lightly in flour with a little salt and pepper added.
In a heavy based frying pan, fry the pieces in sunflower oil until they are browned. Brown as in the deep rich brown of dark chocolate, not brown as in greyish because it hasn't spent much time in the pan.
Reserve the browned pieces on a plate.
In a heavy based stockpot, heat some oil and sweat some shallots, stir regularly.
Add the meat and fry a bit more.
If adding pulses and/or fungi, add them now.
Deglaze the frying pan** and transfer to the stockpot.
If adding booze***, add this now and simmer off.
Add stock****, a drop of balsamic vinegar, maybe an anchovy or two instead of salt, bay leaves.
Opinion on vegetables varies. Some put them all in at the start. I like to put heavy roots in at the start, along with celery. Everything else goes in near the end.
Cook at a low heat for at least and hour. Do not eat the food now. Leave to sit at room temperature overnight and then cook again for at least another hour before serving.


* cheap cuts of meat doesn't mean cheap meat, it means the cheaper cuts of the expensive meat. Cheap meat isn't worth buying.
** The best thing to deglaze with is booze, stock is a minimum second best.
*** Usual rules apply, white wine for chicken , red for lamb or beef, cider for pork, beer for beef. Not absolutes but will save some anguish. Lager is not beer, best to stick to bitters, stouts, porters and dark ales. A dose of honey helps temper a beer for stew without affecting the flavour too much.
**** Oxo is not stock, or any other instant granules except bouillon. Use a soft, paste stock cube as a minimum.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 16 Aug 2012, 03:02
Yeah, I don't really care if I find mold on cheese, because, well, it's cheese, but everything else gets tossed. My stomach is delicate enough and I don't want to make my body angry by accidentally ingesting something I'm allergic to. Like I won't even drink or cook with milk the day after the sell by date. I was just surprised by the bacon because we didn't even have it that long, but I think it's because I had it wrapped in saran wrap instead of in an air tight bag or container. And the saran wrap we have is really crappy.

Interesting - I guess I'm more of a "suck it and see" kind of person, probably because I've grown up with the idea that throwing food away is sacrilege. (Note: you can't make friends easily with this philosophy) Saying that, there were far too many times as a student that I'd realise 3/4 of the way through a sandwich that the bread I'm eating has little green spores all over it. That's when the coke has to come out...

Seldom Killer - interesting that you'd suggest frying off the meat before cooking it. I guess it makes a difference whether you're doing a stockpot/crockpot or have an electric slow-cooker (or are you just being safe?). I usually use an electric slow cooker, so basically shove everything in at say 10am and have that heating and cooking away till something like 5-6pm, slowly adding spices/wine over that time. Usually means the raw meat is beautifully cooked in the stock and is very tender.

I've got a proper tried and tested salad going on now. I've tried it as a base for dishes with both mackerel and chicken, so it seems pretty versatile in that way. It's great for this time of year, as you get a big citrus/mint hit - any Americans suffering with the heat may be interested!

Start cooking your meat/fish of choice.

While that is frying/baking/grilling, shove this stuff in a bowl:
1-2 portions of cooked betroot, thinly sliced (I am able to buy 4 beets ready-cooked in a packet, so 1-2 of these I guess)
Handful of mint leaves, torn up/chopped
Juice and zest of 1/2 an orange
120g of cooked lentils (your choice, they go with everything - I've been using green and 'lentilles vertes', which are just smaller French ones)

Now, shove more stuff in the bowl:
2 tbsp olive oil
2 tbsp red wine vinegar (I've been using white - does it matter? I love wine)
1 tsp pommegranate juice

Get some plates out. Shove some leaves of your choice on there - I've been using baby leaf spinach and watercress.
Wash a cup or two of green beans or sugar-snap peas (I have them raw), slice them and scatter them (preferably over the plates)
If you've got a pommegranate handy, disperse half of the seeds (bits? pods?) over the leaves.
The other half of that orange? Chop it up and sprinkle over the leaves too
Chuck the beetroot mixture over the plates too. Do it well, or your prospective diners will hate you.
Lay the fish/meat over the 'bed' of leaves/beetroot mixture.

Huzzah! A big citrus hit in a meal that is packed full of good things, protein, and like 16 of your five-a-day.


Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: spoon_of_grimbo on 16 Aug 2012, 16:18
i made a thing tonight that consisted of tomatoes, mushrooms, sweetcorn, peppers, onion, and (pre-boiled) carrots, all cooked in a wok with some leftover lean beef mince from last night's dinner, and a generous amount of lea & perrins sauce, paprika and pepper added.  can any of you more culinary-minded individuals enlighten me as to what this recipe is called, if at all?  all i know is it was tasty as hell, and having gotten as much nutritional info as possible, i worked out that the fairly generous portion i had was only about 400calories.  which, for a full meal that was pretty filling, isn't too bad really...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 16 Aug 2012, 17:20
Sounds like a stir-fry to me! And yeah vegetables are awesome like that, you can eat 2 cups and it's only like 40 calories.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 16 Aug 2012, 17:26
I guess you could call it a stir-fry. I dunno, "Spoon of Grimbo" comes to mind.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 16 Aug 2012, 23:17
Seldom Killer - interesting that you'd suggest frying off the meat before cooking it. I guess it makes a difference whether you're doing a stockpot/crockpot or have an electric slow-cooker (or are you just being safe?).

Absolutely nothing to do with safety at all. It's to do with flavour and texture.
As with any meat, seasoning is important. Frying the meat with the seasoning keeps it bound into the meat and means you don't have to season the whole stew to the same level. The flour is in effect the construction of the roux to help thicken and texture the gravy. Frying also helps seal in some of the fat so you're getting that braising effect rather than just boiled meat. You also get a coalescense of the natural sugars and fats from the meat, hence the subsequent deglaze.
Even when using an electric slow-cooker I'll fry the meat ahead of time.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 17 Aug 2012, 01:28
Neat. Well, I'll definitely try that next time I do something in the slow cooker. I realised what a huge difference seasoning the meat, rather than the sauce, makes in dishes like chilli and lasagne, so I guess the same applies here. Thanks!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: spoon_of_grimbo on 18 Aug 2012, 05:02
yeah, i thought stir-fry at first, but i've always associated that with noodles and beansprouts.  i guess you're right though, thanks!  unfortunately, my username has nothing to do with food haha!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 24 Aug 2012, 11:26
I made an oven dish with potato, witloof, leaf celery, ham and cheese. The potatoes were undercooked, so I'm gonna leave those out next time, the dish is plenty filling without them.

Many vegetables that I felt 'meh' about when I was still living with my parents I suddenly find really tasty when I get around to preparing them myself. In this case it's the witloof. I really ought to make more dishes with vegetables as a main ingredient (instead of onion, bell pepper etc.), but there aren't a lot of convenient recipes for small servings. I haven't been able to find a recipe for two using one eggplant, for example.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 24 Aug 2012, 11:41
Searing meat always helps. I always make roast beef and beef stews and whatnot and always sear it before I chuck it in the pot. It really does make a difference in flavor. Same with grilling - sear the outsides on a high flame area to get the awesome grill flavor on the outside and then move the meat to a lower flame area to slowly cook the interior. It gets all the flavor, but still remains juicy and tender. I also always sear chicken before I bake it, especially if it has some kind of coating or breading that I don't want to get mushy while it's sitting in the pan.

But speaking of grilling, I found an excellent way to grill potatoes and still have them be tender! I think I took about 6 smallish yukon gold potatoes, chopped them into 1/2"-1" cubes, mixed them with salt, pepper, garlic, onion, and fresh rosemary (I love my rosemary plant), put them in tin foil, spotted them with some butter (I used Smart Balance, not actual butter), and sealed them up really tight in the foil. About 15 min on the grill, flipping only once, and they were delicious. The left overs I fried up in a skillet the next morning and they made pretty decent home fries as well. You could use pretty much whatever seasoning, but I definitely recommend using a little onion - I made potatoes similar to this without onions once and they were a little bland, even though I used several other seasonings.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 25 Aug 2012, 16:15
I'm going to try something tonight with my roomies.

Pizza.

No tomato sauce, instead a roasted garlic spread, with a goat cheese/sage mix on top, and then covered with transparently sliced tomatoes.

I came up with the idea, only I'm a terrible cook, so my roommate helped piece together exactly how the ingredients would go together, and we'll see how well it turns out. It sounds pretty tasty to me.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 25 Aug 2012, 21:55
How did that turn out?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 25 Aug 2012, 23:42
Meh. A little heavy on the cheese, which was creamy and made the whole thing rather soft. It needs something else, but I'm not sure. I like the idea of chicken on it, but my roommates are not enthused at the idea.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Mister D Nomms on 26 Aug 2012, 00:15
I'm picturing rudimentary pizza makers doing exactly what you did and saying "It needs something else!" (in their pizza making language) before finally settling on a bread/tomato/cheese combo. Then, thousands of years in the future, the cycle repeats.

If you really don't want tomato, try this:
http://www.tastebook.com/recipes/640932-Chicken-Ranchero-Pizza?full_recipe=true
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Zingoleb on 26 Aug 2012, 00:41
That's basically what we did, minus the ranch and chicken. I feel like chicken would make it an excellent dish but they are so opposed to it for whatever reason.

Oh, right, because they eat nothing but beef, every night. Bleh.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 26 Aug 2012, 08:49
Chicken on pizza is so good! Other options - spinach, alfredo as a sauce, italian seasoning, red/green bell pepper, prosciutto or capicola, fresh mozzarella instead or with the goat cheese.... Really the possibilities are endless. Pizza is awesome.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 26 Aug 2012, 09:44
That's basically what we did, minus the ranch and chicken. I feel like chicken would make it an excellent dish but they are so opposed to it for whatever reason.

Oh, right, because they eat nothing but beef, every night. Bleh.

Make the pizza with chicken, and don't tell them it's on there. Then if/when they say it's awesome, inform them that it's because it has chicken on it. Revel in their new meal of crow.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 26 Aug 2012, 10:21
20 years ago, I did an anonymous restaurant review column for my small suburban newspaper. A year or so later, I was invited to enter my own pizza in a "Celebrity Chef" contest at an upscale pizza chain in the Detroit area. The night before, I experimented with two pizzas:
Using pre-made Boboli crusts, I applied mozzarella cheese, a thin spread of Major Grey's chutney and pieces of tandoori chicken, for which I have a simple recipe (plain yogurt, lemon juice, vinegar, oil, curry powder and red food coloring; put on a grill). For the second, I kept the cheese and chutney but replaced the chicken with shrimp sauteed with garlic and saffron. For the contest, I worked with a restaurant chef who made the tandoori version, adding some onion. It didn't win, but a version of it suspiciously showed up on the chain's menu in the next year. I entered the saffron shrimp version the next year. It didn't win either, but it was my favorite. Although I've made neither one since.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 26 Aug 2012, 17:45
Mmmmmmm....homemade pizzaaaaa.

I'm a big fan of bbq chicken pizza. Plus, it's SO easy to make.





Tonight, I'm making banana bread :-) I found a recipe on food.com that had a ton of great reviews and edited it a bit- swapped out the butter for margarine, added a few tablespoons of applesauce, a cup and a half of walnuts and a few dashes of cinnamon. There is currently a heavenly scent wafting through my apartment. I hope this thing tastes as good as it smells.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 26 Aug 2012, 17:56
Were you out of chocolate chips and pecans?!  You must have been, only reason to settle for walnuts in banana bread.

(I think walnuts are the wonder bread of nuts. though I did have a cake with walnuts in last week and it was superb)

Tonight we had a pork/shiitake stir fry thing with broccoli.  Steve even ate the broccoli so it must have been good.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 27 Aug 2012, 11:31
Lol! They kind of are, but I love them just the same. I've never met a nut I didn't like  :-P

The bread is delicious! I was surprised because usually I can't bake to save my life, but this was moist, not too dense but sooo filling just the same. Pecans sound like they would have been fabulous though- next time!


I don't get the big vendetta against broccoli, but Nick is the same way- I have to chop it up into bits or he'll just shove it aside. Personally? I could eat a whole pound of it by itself- steamed, roasted, raw...you name it.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 27 Aug 2012, 12:14
I love broccoli! I do not understand people who don't like broccoli. Like seriously I think it is one of the least offensive vegetables you can eat, next to carrots and peas.

Also banana bread is nomalicious. As is zucchini bread. Hmm. Now I need to ask my mom for her recipes so I can make them...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 27 Aug 2012, 12:32
If we are having a quick bread nom off I submit pumpkin bread to the ballot.

Also, I had to learn to like broccoli.  I have always liked it raw, but even now just a pile of cooked broccoli is not real appealing to me.  I need to eat it in something.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 27 Aug 2012, 12:57
I learned that Mrs. Dash is a very useful seasoning on broccoli for people who don't like it very much. Also garlic, because garlic makes everything better.

Also yes, pumpkin bread is also very good. That's yet another recipe I need to ask for!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 27 Aug 2012, 14:14
I find it interesting when people love broccoli but have an aversion to its close cousin, cauliflower.

I've also considered how versatile chicken thighs are. Recipe or something to come, I'm sure.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 27 Aug 2012, 15:08
But when talking about broccoli, are people here referring to calabrese, a coarser purple version of cauliflower? Or are they mentioning the vegetable delicacy with a short summer season that is purple-sprouting broccoli?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 27 Aug 2012, 15:08
(http://www.worldcommunitycookbook.org/season/guide/photos/broccoli.jpg)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 27 Aug 2012, 15:20
Calabrese, then.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 27 Aug 2012, 18:02
Purple?  :?

If you're in need of a banana bread recipe, I just found & posted one today: Whole Wheat Banana Bread (http://veggie-recipe.blogspot.com/2012/08/whole-wheat-banana-bread.html).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 27 Aug 2012, 18:06
Carrots are also purple! But it's the orange ones that are popular.

I find it interesting when people love broccoli but have an aversion to its close cousin, cauliflower.

I like that too. Mashed cauliflower is yummy and is better for you than mashed potatoes! (Though not as yummy or addictive as mashed potatoes, they are still quite good.) I really want to try this (http://snailsview.com/2011/03/15/moroccan-roasted-cauliflower/) recipe for roasted cauliflower - it sounds delicious. Really I think the only veggies I have problems with are cabbage, brussel sprouts, and various forms of greens, but probably because I haven't had them fixed in a way I like. Also they tend to stink and smell is a big factor for me. And mushrooms because they're squeaky and also a fungus. And beans, but only the larger ones and when they aren't mixed with something, but that's because of texture not flavor.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 27 Aug 2012, 18:10
Oh I heard a cool article the other day about how in large sections of Africa people farm sweet potatoes, but it's a variety that's either white or yellow inside! And only the orange ones from North America have vitamin A in them, and it turns out vitamin A is really crucial in preventing malnutrition and starvation - like even if people are getting "enough" calories if they don't get vitamin A there's still a really high death rate. So now they're introducing orange sweet potatoes to Africa and everybody's like yay yes I do not want to die I will pay extra for orange potatoes.

They also talked about scientists trying to do the same thing artificially through genetics to add important vitamins to other foods. And the slow reappearance of odd colored heirloom potatoes. (I feel so smart when I listen to NPR.)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 27 Aug 2012, 18:53
That's actually pretty cool!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 27 Aug 2012, 19:31
found it: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2012/08/15/158783117/saving-lives-in-africa-with-the-humble-sweet-potato
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 27 Aug 2012, 23:34
Calabrese can be purple. (http://www.chilternseeds.co.uk/item_1735d_calabrese_miranda_seeds)

So can lots of vegetables (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/gardening/article-1363906/Purple-patch-All-sorts-veg-come-purple--look-great-healthier-green-ones.html), though.  I have grown purple French beans and purple potatoes.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 27 Aug 2012, 23:45
We grow purple string beans in our garden. They turn a kind of an olive green when you cook them, though.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 28 Aug 2012, 06:52
Mmmmmm.....mashed cauliflower is awesome. I definitely have to say that my favorite way to prepare broccoli is to roast it with a few drizzles of olive oil & some minced garlic. Sprinkle some parmesan cheese on top and omggg. It has a nice smoky flavor and a deliciously satisfying crisp. I want some of this right now.


And pumpkin bread, yes! Autumn is quickly approaching and while I'm not excited about the change in the weather, I am super pumped for seasonal produce.


(Also- yay sweet potatoes!)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: dr. nervioso on 28 Aug 2012, 07:12
I want to make zucchini bread, but my floor's oven is crappy.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 28 Aug 2012, 08:07
So, go up/down a floor, and hang with it while it cooks. 

Bring a book. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 28 Aug 2012, 08:43
My father made purple cauliflower once and steamed it.  It turned an unappetizing grey and looked a lot like brains,
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lupercal on 29 Aug 2012, 14:59
But isn't eating it how you gain its powers?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Omega Entity on 29 Aug 2012, 18:34
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQfOO4wKrrA (http://Braaaaaains)

Be patient! 1:18 is when the good part is  :-D
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: ackblom12 on 05 Sep 2012, 15:43
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-dhmhi9qTKSs/UEfVChZiorI/AAAAAAAACqc/UTAsIrW8nJk/s1137/IMAG0031.jpg)

Delicious!
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 14 Sep 2012, 09:30
So, what should I do with all the concord grapes in the fridge?  Picked 'em last weekend... about two grocery bags full.  Not enough for wine, though. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 14 Sep 2012, 09:32
Jam, or pie?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Redball on 14 Sep 2012, 09:38
Can you pick some more, then make wine? I recall that wine recipes call for 3 lbs per gallon for generic flavor, 6 lbs per gallon for fruity flavor, 9 lbs per gallon for pronounced fruity flavor. I can look that up if you wish.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: LTK on 14 Sep 2012, 10:40
I invited some fellow students over for dinner yesterday. I stir-fried a cabbage (the pointy kind) with curry, cashews, coconut, and uh... capples and conions. Then for dessert, I wanted to make a pie, but the only pre-made pie crust that I could find was more like a pack of three flat, round cakes. So I went ahead and bought those. On the first layer I put a half-litre bucket of vanilla quark, on the second layer an entire pureed mango (fresh: skinned, cut, blender'd), sprinkled with cinnamon, and that was topped off with the final cake layer. It was then cooled in the fridge for an hour and a half or so, and subsequently covered in whipped cream. I never imagined something so easily thrown together could be so tasty.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 16 Sep 2012, 11:03
So, what should I do with all the concord grapes in the fridge?  Picked 'em last weekend... about two grocery bags full.  Not enough for wine, though.

Freeze them. Frozen grapes are delicious (and make great ice cubes in wine haha).
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 29 Sep 2012, 20:27
ladies and gentlemen, may I introduce....


Red Concord Grape Pie! 

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8459/8037280207_1a27c2e954.jpg)

(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8312/8037279137_1109f37ed9.jpg)

Surprisingly delicious!  Not at all like jam.  For one thing, you skin the grapes and just cook the insides to deseed them.  Then you mix the green pulp back in with the skins, put into a shell and bake - the color bleeds from the skins.  The texture is very close to cherry pie, but the flavor - well, concord grapes are quite tart, and that's not lost, but enough sugar's added to cut the pucker effect.  But not enough to make it taste like jelly or jam. 

It took the better part of one of the two bags of grapes.  I think I'll have to do this again...

Oh, and my daughter taught me an easy way to weave a real lattice crust! 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Lines on 29 Sep 2012, 21:22
Interesting! I've never heard of a grape pie. Where'd you get the recipe?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 29 Sep 2012, 22:21
Here (http://allrecipes.com/recipe/concord-grape-pie-i/).  I looked at other ones, too.  They're all pretty much the same.  I cut back on the sugar some because I used red concord grapes, which are a good bit sweeter than regular dark (almost blue) concord grapes.  Those are the ones used for commercial grape jellies, that dark purple stuff. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: lepetitfromage on 30 Sep 2012, 07:28
Oooooh, that sounds really good!






In other food related news- I got a crock pot for my birthday! I am SO EXCITED. Favorite crock pot recipes, anyone?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 30 Sep 2012, 08:05
Today I'm trying out my idea for a fruitcake/bread recipe! I'm starting with banana bread (http://veggie-recipe.blogspot.com/2012/08/whole-wheat-banana-bread.html), going to sub some of the banana+yogurt for canned pumpkin, and add all the stuff I thought sounded good: dried apple, craisins, dates, crystallized ginger, and pumpkin seeds. May also put chopped pecans and/or a sugar frosting drizzle on the top. I'm still trying to figure out if I need to be using more or less flour & stuff (more to hold up all the additions, or less so it will fit in the pan, or no change?), and what kind of spices to add, if any.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Papersatan on 30 Sep 2012, 08:42
I'd replace the banana, but lave the yogurt.  the sour of the yogurt is acting as the catalyst for the baking soda to leaven the bread..  If you replace banana in a 1 to 1 ratio you shouldn't have to change the flour.  You may end up with extra batter, but just fill your pan to its normal height and then put the extra in another little pan to bake.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 30 Sep 2012, 13:17
I just did a bit of an epic cooking session and made four portions of spaghetti bolognese sauce, one leftover portion of risotto after dinner (desperately needed flavour - I hadn't got any cheese, butter, yeast extract or salt, all the things I usually use for flavouring, so I added herbes de provence) and in the oven I've got four portions of "chicken" chausseur which looks rather odd and too onion-y, but we'll see.

My room is still an absolute bombsite, mostly with random kitchen stuff I can't find a home for. Have yet to discover the whereabouts of the lids for my freezer boxes, which is an issue given that I've got all these boxes of food to freeze...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 30 Sep 2012, 14:30
The Quorn chasseur was a disaster. I put it in a Pyrex dish with a plastic lid. Duh. Thankfully one portion was in a separate casserole so I do get to taste it. Hm. More details in my cooking blog (http://faintwithhunger.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/a-rookie-mistake.html), I can't bear to write about it twice! I'm going to the bar ;-)
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Carl-E on 30 Sep 2012, 17:47
I hope the food at the bar's decent! 

Hoist a few for me. 
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 01 Oct 2012, 01:26
I neither ate nor drank at the bar - it's the regular hangout for the college's lesbian crowd and we spent several hours laughing about various things and entertaining freshers. Then somehow it was 1am.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 01 Oct 2012, 14:34
I ended up using a boxed mix I had around (Pillsbury's Pumpkin Quick Bread) and added about 3/4 cup total of fruit, no extra spices, and sprinkled with pecan bits on top. It turned out really well, and now I have all these bags of stuff, so I got 3 more boxes of mix last night. I'm going to try making little loaves to give people around Christmas or whatever.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Castlerook on 11 Oct 2012, 10:38
Don't have any photos for these yet, but I do like making them.

Salmon and Hake fish cakes.
Serves 4

450g of floury potatoes, cut into chunks
450g of mixed fish fillets (I went with Hake and Salmon), skinned.
Small dash of tarragon
2 tbsp of milk
1 tbsp plain flour
1 tbsp butter
1 egg, beaten
115g of breadcrumbs
4 tsbp of vegetable oil for shallow frying
Salt and pepper

1. Cook the potatoes in boiling water for about 15-20 minutes (I poke a chunk with a steak knife and lift it out. If it falls off by itself, its done). Drain well and mash them until smooth, using the butter, milk, salt and pepper.
2. Put the fish into a frying pan and pour in just enough water to cover the fish. Bring the water to boil and then let it simmer for 5 minutes (Honestly, I let it boil until the salmon has noticeable changes colour). When its done, remove the fish from the heat and let it cool. When its cool enough, break it into chunks.
3. Mix the fish, potatoes and tarragon together and form into either 4 large patties or 8 smaller ones.
4. Dust the fish cakes with flour, then dip them into the beaten egg, then dredge it in the breadcrumbs. Put the fish cakes into the fridge for at least 30 minutes.
5. Heat a frying pan to a medium heat with the oil and fry the fish cakes for 5 minutes each side, until the breadcrumb coating is browned.
6. Serve with a salad of your choice and lemon slices and then scoff them down.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: The Seldom Killer on 11 Oct 2012, 22:42
Was making lemon curd last night and had some left over after filling two jars. Added a bit of cooking whiskey. Quite nice indeed.

Have also put down some garlic to pickle. It's just with peppercorns, mustard seeds and lemon peel. Am thinking about another more adventurous version, maybe with anchovies and some herbs. Alternatively I might go down the route of a roast garlic chutney.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 Oct 2012, 04:47
I have enough packet mixes (the packets of spices etc that you add to actual food when you're too lazy/poor/single to justify making your own spice mixes) for a month of meals, and probably other than the fresh veg enough food to make them up. My freezer is stuffed with food that was on special offer and basically I should not need to spend more than £10 a week on food until the new year.

This is good because I still have £1200 less than I need to pay my rent...
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 12 Oct 2012, 05:07
Question for people who know how to do these things: Last night I made scalloped potatoes and something went wrong with the sauce. The directions said:

"In a medium-size saucepan, melt 1.5T butter over medium heat. Mix in 1.5T flour and 1/4t salt, and stir constantly with a whisk for one minute. Stir in 1c milk. Cook until mixture has thickened. Stir in 3/4c cheese all at once, and continue stirring until melted, about 30 to 60 seconds."

There's no mention of how long it should take to thicken after adding the milk, so I gave it about 5 minutes, maybe more like 10? (I had second thoughts about the amount of onion and was fishing it out of the casserole dish with one hand while stirring with the other.) There was absolutely zero sign of thickening, just a tan layer forming on top - the butter, I guess? So I went ahead and added the cheese (from a bag of shredded, not off a block, so this may also be part of the problem) which melted but took more than 30-60 seconds and didn't seem to really dissolve and "become one with" the not-thickened milk.

So given that description maybe it's no shock that what I ended up with was potato slices in melted butter and melted cheese. It still smelled & tasted right, but the consistency was not right. Where did I screw it up?
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 Oct 2012, 05:11
Did you add the flour all at once, or bit by bit? I think you add it slowly and mix it in, then add a bit more.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: bainidhe_dub on 12 Oct 2012, 05:16
I had the flour and salt measured into a cup and dumped it in all at once when the butter was completely melted. It mixed up into a light brown goo.
What's weird is this is completely the opposite experience from the couple times I've tried to make bechamel sauce - those basically turned into thick paste no matter what I did.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: pwhodges on 12 Oct 2012, 05:46
The key word to look up for explanation is roux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roux).  You can combine the flour into the melted fat all at once - this is not a problem*.  You can then cook it a little before starting to add liquid.  The liquid should then be added slowly, incorporating each addition before moving on to the next, otherwise you get lumpiness (and the lumps reduce the overall thickening effect, by concentrating it).  It is very hard to get the same effect just by whisking, and I wouldn't do it that way.  Similarly, you must heat slowly enough that your stirring can keep ahead of the tendency for the thickening mixture to form lumps. 

Basically, it's a knack which you will just get the hang of in time.  Oh, and flours do vary somewhat in their thickening power as well.

* It is difficult to mix flour directly into water - this can be achieved by adding it extremely slowly, while stirring vigorously or preferably whisking.  Going the roux route is far preferable.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Barmymoo on 12 Oct 2012, 06:28
Roux is the word I had in mind, but I have never successfully made one either! And usually for that reason - I add the liquid too quickly. But it didn't sound like that was the stage at which the issue occurred.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Edith on 12 Oct 2012, 06:38
It sounds to me like you should have added the liquid bit by bit, and then cooked it longer. You don't have to stir it every second, you can be still for up to 45 seconds or so and then stir again, scraping up anything that was truong to brown on the bottom. Are you cooking on electricity or gas? I find it harder to thicken a white sauce on gas, for some reason.
Title: Re: A Cooking Thread?
Post by: Castlerook on 12 Oct 2012, 07:18
Bear in mind as well that if you are making a roux, all the flour must be mixed into the butter and dissolved before you add any liquid. This is vital because if you all the milk and there are still clumps of flour in the mix, you are going to end up with a sauce that is going to have a very strong f