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Author Topic: English is weird  (Read 101073 times)

Tova

Re: English is weird
« Reply #900 on: 19 Mar 2019, 16:09 »

Does it bother anyone else when someone says or writes "All of a sudden" instead of "Suddenly" when conveying a story?

Not really. You are generally better off conveying a sudden event implicitly through your prose than by explicitly saying so via either of the expressions above.
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JoeCovenant

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #901 on: 20 Mar 2019, 01:22 »

Does it bother anyone else when someone says or writes "All of a sudden" instead of "Suddenly" when conveying a story?

If it's being used as dialogue, then nit a problem.
But if part of the prose/narration, then editors HATE that word...
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #902 on: 20 Mar 2019, 02:13 »

I'm confused. I was under the impression that "all of a sudden" is correct. What's wrong with the expression?
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #903 on: 20 Mar 2019, 02:27 »

Agreed - it's a perfectly natural idiom to me, expressing more surprise and drama than a simple suddenly.
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Tova

Re: English is weird
« Reply #904 on: 20 Mar 2019, 02:40 »

Grammatically, it's perfectly fine.

Then there's "all of the sudden." TIL.
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #905 on: 20 Mar 2019, 13:03 »

I'm just going to take a moment here to mourn the loss of the word "elite" - which used to designate those distinguished by their great capability - as opposed to "privileged" which used to designate those distinguished by their position in society. 

Now that it has been co-opted as part of a narrative about privileged people abusing their positions, we have a diminished capacity for talking about the great athletes, the geniuses, the autodidacts and original thinkers, the disciplined students, the insightful and enlightened, and those of great spirit, generosity, and character.  Or at least for talking about them in a way that doesn't begin with casting them in suspicion of having and abusing undeserved social standing.
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Tova

Re: English is weird
« Reply #906 on: 22 Mar 2019, 20:05 »

Momentarily means for a moment, not in a moment, you barbarians. Try presently.
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pecoros7

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #907 on: 29 Mar 2019, 19:21 »

Momentarily means for a moment, not in a moment, you barbarians. Try presently.

"Ladies and gentlemen, we will be landing momentarily, so please prepare to unboard the plane as quickly as possible. We will not be coming to a full stop."

I'm just going to take a moment here to mourn the loss of the word "elite" - which used to designate those distinguished by their great capability - as opposed to "privileged" which used to designate those distinguished by their position in society. 

Now that it has been co-opted as part of a narrative about privileged people abusing their positions, we have a diminished capacity for talking about the great athletes, the geniuses, the autodidacts and original thinkers, the disciplined students, the insightful and enlightened, and those of great spirit, generosity, and character.  Or at least for talking about them in a way that doesn't begin with casting them in suspicion of having and abusing undeserved social standing.

As adjectives, we still have "exemplary", "exceptional", "foremost", "preeminent" and "supreme". and for the noun we have "exemplar", "elect", "choice", "cream" and "top". English is replete with words to say very nearly the same thing.
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #908 on: 30 Mar 2019, 14:09 »

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Case

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #909 on: 23 Apr 2019, 10:37 »

Linguists find that English is actually rather weird  (but, of course, German is weirder - ranked 33rd and 10th out of 239, respectively)
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #910 on: 24 Apr 2019, 00:36 »

It's interesting, but looking into the full list, there's a couple of surprises. I think some languages might need some more work. And perhaps based off of the efforts that have been made to exhaustively list all features (descriptively), rather than on a 1958 introduction to the language.

Then again, the image might skew a bit, as the database does take into account some, but not all, different variants for some languages, begging the question, which variant did this list take into account or not?
« Last Edit: 24 Apr 2019, 00:42 by Cornelius »
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cybersmurf

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #911 on: 24 Apr 2019, 01:16 »

Well, that list seems a bit weird. Hungarian among the ten least weird languages? Admittedly, I don't know that language, but AFAIK the closest relative language to Hungarian is Finnish. OK, being that far down the tree, and basically being the only one left doesn't make a language weird necessarily, but I also heard it's hard to learn (but again that could be attributed to its uniqueness).

The weirdest part about English IMHO is the spelling. AFAIK the spelling didn't undergo the changes the spoken language did, thus weirdness ensued.
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Cornelius

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #912 on: 24 Apr 2019, 01:23 »

Then again, they only picked 21 out of 192 language features to compare against. Pick another 21, and you'll have a completely different image.
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Case

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #913 on: 24 Apr 2019, 05:51 »

The weirdest part about English IMHO is the spelling. AFAIK the spelling didn't undergo the changes the spoken language did, thus weirdness ensued.

They mention that in another article - that English has five vowel-letters, but uses eleven vowel-phonemes.

To me, the weirdest thing about English is the word-order - not because it's complicated, but because it's not. It's rigidly Subject-Verb-Object. I just found out that German is alternating between SVO and SOV (with other possible combinations). Now I know why my brain insists on trying out 'perfectly logical' ways of constructing English sentences that end up sounding weirdAF.

Then again, they only picked 21 out of 192 language features to compare against. Pick another 21, and you'll have a completely different image.

IIRC, in another article, the authors acknowledge that their acculturation may skew their choice of features in ways they can neither recognize, nor compensate for. That African linguists e.g. might choose a completely different set of features.
« Last Edit: 24 Apr 2019, 06:00 by Case »
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #914 on: 24 Apr 2019, 06:29 »

IIRC, in another article, the authors acknowledge that their acculturation may skew their choice of features in ways they can neither recognize, nor compensate for. That African linguists e.g. might choose a completely different set of features.

Which is rather hard. In trying to be less Anglo-centric, they may have selected, subconsciously, for the features that will prove it to be an outlier.

And then again, it's also a question of which features do they have data for. Much though I like the concept of the atlas, I dare say, looking at the entries for Dutch, it's not complete, and I'm not convinced the sources they quote in the entries are necessarily the most up to date or even correct. But that's going by a sample of one, and only means that there's room for improvement. Like, for instance, including all major variants of a language. I'm not saying they should have every dialect, though. While  massively interesting, that's another level of detail entirely.

Then again, the fact that it is incomplete, does have its own implications for the data of this list.

To me, the weirdest thing about English is the word-order - not because it's complicated, but because it's not. It's rigidly Subject-Verb-Object. I just found out that German is alternating between SVO and SOV (with other possible combinations). Now I know why my brain insists on trying out 'perfectly logical' ways of constructing English sentences that end up sounding weirdAF.

That would be part of it.
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Case

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #915 on: 24 Apr 2019, 07:49 »

To me, the weirdest thing about English is the word-order - not because it's complicated, but because it's not. It's rigidly Subject-Verb-Object. I just found out that German is alternating between SVO and SOV (with other possible combinations). Now I know why my brain insists on trying out 'perfectly logical' ways of constructing English sentences that end up sounding weirdAF.

That would be part of it.


Well, yes - obviously, my brain being weird as f**k is a contributing factor. We can take that as a given.  :-D
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #916 on: 02 May 2019, 21:21 »

It's interesting that most (if not all) forms of non-rhotic English are viewed as sounding uneducated in the USA. Examples; any form of Southern or rural drawl, Jersey, Bostonian (non-Harvard), African-American Vernacular, Valley Talk, and that one little island off the coast of Maine.
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Re: English is weird
« Reply #917 on: 02 May 2019, 22:12 »

It would be interesting to construct some sort of metric combining how weird a language is with how many speakers it has. English might not win.
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Case

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #918 on: 03 May 2019, 04:13 »

It would be interesting to construct some sort of metric combining how weird a language is with how many speakers it has. English might not win.

I think that was one of the points of the article - that the 'main' Euro-languages are actually pretty weird (i.e. they share few features with other languages). The least weird language is apparently Hindi.

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Part of this is to say that some of the languages you take for granted as being normal (like English, Spanish, or German) consistently do things differently than most of the other languages in the world.

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Re: English is weird
« Reply #919 on: 03 May 2019, 08:55 »

Out of curiosity, I've taken the list from the article, and for the languages with data for 14 or more of their selected features, filled in the number of native speakers (based off of wikipedia, but then numbers of native speakers for a lot of languages are only estimates anyway.)

That gives an average weirdindex between 0.48 and 0.60, except for the languages with between 100 M and 1000M speakers, which average at 0.788.

Those are:
  • Spanish: 0,7897
  • Mandarin: 0,7884
  • English: 0,7562
  • Japanese: 0,7356
  • Russian: 0,4006
  • Hindi: 0,0872

The least weird group is, surprisingly, the languages that no longer have any native speakers, averaging at 0.4801

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