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Author Topic: Everybody Loves Science!  (Read 50132 times)

SageJiraiya

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #50 on: 30 Jul 2013, 16:02 »

No talky here so we no give spoilers...
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Carl-E

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #51 on: 30 Jul 2013, 20:41 »

Oh, I remember that one now...

Anyhoo, the universe is expanding, and this years winners for the nobel in physics showed it's increasing at an increasing rate... which means that the stars will be moving farther apart faster and faster, to the point where they'll all be too far away for detectable radiation to reach us...

...which means the night sky will be completely dark.  If the starts made you feel small, imagine what the void will do! 
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #52 on: 31 Jul 2013, 02:18 »

What will happen to the Moon? And the planets that are visible with the naked eye?  :-D
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #53 on: 31 Jul 2013, 03:00 »

That depends. If our sun's gravitational force is strong enough to keep the solar system together we would still be able to see them, even if the rest of the galaxy has drifted too far apart.
However, if the solar system also gets pulled apart, then we won't see anything in the sky, not even the moon. Even if it's still in orbit around earth and was not pulled away too, there won't be any light from our sun to be reflected off it. As far as i know the moon itself does not give off any detectable radiation, so without any background radiation we wouldn't even be able to detect it that way. :-D
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LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #54 on: 31 Jul 2013, 04:26 »

The sun will have died a hundred times over before we get to that point.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #55 on: 31 Jul 2013, 04:30 »

Obviously, yes. But assuming it doesn't makes for more interesting scenarios.
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LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #56 on: 31 Jul 2013, 12:00 »

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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

ackblom12

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #57 on: 31 Jul 2013, 14:35 »

http://www.engadget.com/2013/07/26/google-universal-translator-prototypes/

Quote
It sounds like Google's Babel fish-esque instant translation solution is making progress -- Android VP Hugo Barra told The UK Times that Google's got hardware prototypes (in the form of mobile phones) already working. Moreover, in a recent test he took part in, the system was "near-perfect" with certain language combinations (English to Portuguese is specifically cited).

The biggest barrier, beyond the translation itself, is speech recognition. In so many words, background noise interferes with the translation software, thus affecting results. But Barra said it works "close to 100 percent" when used in "controlled environments." Sounds perfect for diplomats, not so much for real-world conversations. Of course, Google's non-real-time, text-based translation software built into Chrome leaves quite a bit to be desired, making us all the more wary of putting our faith into Google's verbal solution. As the functionality is still "several years away," though, there's still plenty of time to convert us.
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #58 on: 18 Aug 2013, 19:33 »

NASA has deemed the Kepler probe to be beyond repair.

http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-calls-off-attempts-fix-kepler-space-telescope-204816633.html

I guess this means planet hunters are at the mercy of radio astronomy now.
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #59 on: 19 Aug 2013, 03:14 »

http://www.engadget.com/2013/07/26/google-universal-translator-prototypes/

With Google building the system to caption every video on YouTube, they have the raw material for perfecting the algorithms, but what they need is a critical mass of people who go in and correct the errors so it can learn enough to work in non-ideal situations. It's both hilarious and fascinating to turn on the automatic captions for the videos that have it to see how far off it can be, but also occasionally scary with some of the lines it gets right against all odds.
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #60 on: 19 Aug 2013, 07:52 »

My daughter's a Taylor Swift fan, so we found this one enlightening. 


They do a bunch of others - find your favorite! 
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #61 on: 19 Aug 2013, 13:18 »

Actually, I was referring to the general societal stigma against mathematical understanding.  If a person's illiterate, they try and hide the fact.  But when someone's innumerate?  They brag about it.  "I never did understand any of that math stuff" is a common attitude, and parents saying "Oh, don't worry about it, I was bad at math too" just makes it socially hereditary in the worst possible way. 

And, of course, it's supposed to be worse for women, the poor dears - so difficult to wrap your head around such ideas when you're a barefoot, pregnant slave to your hormones...

I'm actually better at math than 99% of Americans, I just hate it with an unbridled passion. So much so that about a year before dropping out of school, I took a fundamentals of algebra class that I did only one homework assignment in (and nothing else) and failed the class with a 4%. When I pointed out to the teacher after class that there was no way my grade was that high, she just told me "Fuck you, you just proved that you could have passed this class but just refused to" and told me to leave.
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #62 on: 19 Aug 2013, 13:58 »

Attitude is everything!   :roll:
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LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #63 on: 01 Sep 2013, 07:22 »

The Guardian has a new science blog, and it's got some interesting stuff. For example:

The ups and downs of porn: sexism, relationships and sexual aggression
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #64 on: 15 Sep 2013, 15:16 »



I've always wondered what that smell was!

From birdandmoon.com, a biology webcomic.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #65 on: 16 Sep 2013, 18:54 »

Mind BLOWN.



Quote
Gears may seem like a purely human invention. And yet the basic interlocking mechanism found inside grandfather clocks and car steering systems has now turned up in the remarkably powerful legs of young planthopper insects.

The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, provides the first known example of working gears that evolved in a living being.

"It's a wonderful example of the clever solutions that nature comes up with," said Robert Full, a biomechanist at UC Berkeley who was not involved in the study. "It was brilliant."

While examining flightless planthopper insects in the genus Issus, University of Cambridge neurobiologist Malcolm Burrows discovered that the young insects' legs had gear teeth that locked into place while jumping.

"We weren't deliberately looking for it. Why would we?" said Burrows, who conducted the research with University of Bristol engineer Gregory Sutton. "There's been no description of gear wheels functioning in animals before. "

Issus planthoppers make fleas and other jumping insects look like junior varsity pole-vaulters. The adult bugs can leap with an acceleration of roughly 500 Gs in a matter of milliseconds. An average human can withstand about 5 Gs of acceleration before passing out.

To figure out what made these insects so springy, the researchers ventured outdoors to gather a few bugs, with a little help from the sharp eyes of Burrows' young grandson. Some of the planthoppers were adults, and some were nymphs.

The pair used a high-speed camera to photograph the planthoppers while they jumped. That's when they spotted the gear teeth on the insides of the insects' equivalent of thighs. Each gear strip was about 350 to 400 micrometers long — about half as thick as a credit card — with about 10 to 12 teeth in each.

The discovery was shocking. Burrows had been studying jumping insects for a long time, and he'd never seen anything like it.

Other insects, like grasshoppers, use their legs to push their bodies straight up. But the planthoppers' legs move more like a breaststroke, splaying out to the sides while propelling the body upward.

That method of locomotion can be tricky. If one leg fires first, the planthopper will end up spinning, like a one-armed breast-stroke swimmer.

But sending a signal from the brain to coordinate both legs takes time and extra neural bandwidth. So the planthopper's body has an ingenious solution that keeps the legs in step without a thought. When one leg starts to jump, the gear teeth on that leg engage with the gear teeth on the other so they both push off at the same time.

Using the gear method, the insects' legs can synchronize within 30 microseconds. If the insect had to think about synchronizing its legs, Burrows said, it would take one or two milliseconds to send a message from its brain to its muscles.

In other words, the gear method is tens of times faster than a single bug thought.

Oddly, only the nymphs have these gears, Burrows and Sutton discovered. The adults lose the gears when they're fully grown; apparently, they can generate enough friction between their strong, solid legs.

But if this is such a handy engineering tool, why not keep using it into adulthood? Perhaps it's because of wear and tear, Burrows said.

If you break a tooth on a gear in your car or your bike, you have to get it fixed. Nymphs don't have repair shops, but because they shed their bodies into progressively larger exoskeletons as they grow, they're constantly getting upgrades anyway. Once they're adults, stuck in their permanent bodies, they don't have that luxury.

While humans have been doing pretty well with their man-made gears, the insect's design could still provide insight for engineers, Burrows said. For example, these gear teeth are asymmetrical rather than uniform. Because they need to work only in one direction on the insect, perhaps the odd shape maximizes the bang for their potential energy buck.

There are other "ornamental cogs" in nature, the authors wrote in Science, such as those on the shell of the cog wheel turtle Heosemys spinosa. Crocodile hearts also have a toothed cog valve that may help them stay under water for longer periods by redirecting blood flow to their most vital organs.

In any case, the research shows it's rarely wise to underestimate evolution, the scientists said.

"Any statement that you make like that, that something is uniquely human is just waiting to be disproven," Full said.
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #66 on: 17 Sep 2013, 03:59 »

Yet again, more proof that God doesn't exist! 

Quote from: Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Now it is such a bizarrely improbable coincidence that anything so mind-bogglingly useful could have evolved purely by chance that some thinkers have chosen to see it as a final and clinching proof of the NON-existence of God.
The argument goes like this:
`I refuse to prove that I exist,' says God, `for proof denies faith, and without faith I am nothing.'
`But,' says Man, `Gears on a grasshopper are a dead giveaway, aren't they? They could not have evolved by chance. They prove you exist, and so therefore, by your own arguments, you don't. QED.'
`Oh dear,' says God, `I hadn't thought of that,' and promptly disappears in a puff of logic.
`Oh, that was easy,' says Man, and for an encore goes on to prove that black is white and gets himself killed on the next zebra crossing.
Most leading theologians claim that this argument is a load of dingo's kidneys, but that didn't stop Oolon Colluphid making a small fortune when he used it as the central theme of his best-selling book, "Well, That about Wraps It Up for God."
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pwhodges

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #67 on: 17 Sep 2013, 04:20 »

I went to see a stage production of HHGG at the weekend.  It had Simon Jones as Arthur Dent (the original radio actor), and Neil Gaiman as the Voice of the Book.  The transfer was generally well done, including quite a lot from the later books that was not in the original radio series (1 & 2), but the timing got sloppy in the second half, which also had some songs which were a waste of time (it was the first performance of a new run).  Marvin was particularly magnificent, though.

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LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #68 on: 17 Sep 2013, 04:55 »

Mind BLOWN.
That is awesome, they not only figured out why they have these gears but also why they lose them as adults. Apparently animals have to deal with wear and tear as well!



This is a human brain.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

ackblom12

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #69 on: 17 Sep 2013, 12:23 »

A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

Quote
Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.
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Carl-E

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #70 on: 22 Sep 2013, 02:25 »

And, on a slightly related note...



(this almost wound up in the pointless thread, but it isn't, really...)
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Akima

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #71 on: 22 Sep 2013, 02:58 »

Well, if String Theory achieves nothing else, that was very cool.
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LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #72 on: 22 Sep 2013, 09:38 »

Best thing I've seen all month.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #73 on: 24 Sep 2013, 10:46 »

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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #74 on: 24 Sep 2013, 14:59 »

And because I can't think of a better place to put it, here's a very long write-up of the career of a James Fadiman, who was at the head of psychedelics research until the FDA banned them, and then decided to bring them back.

http://www.themorningnews.org/article/the-heretic
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #75 on: 25 Sep 2013, 01:28 »

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pwhodges

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #76 on: 25 Sep 2013, 02:05 »

Very interesting...
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"Being human, having your health; that's what's important."  (from: Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi )
"As long as we're all living, and as long as we're all having fun, that should do it, right?"  (from: The Eccentric Family )

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #77 on: 25 Sep 2013, 03:23 »

Indeed. The human mind is extremely permeable in many ways we don't yet know about. It's good to see that some people are taking the results to heart.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #78 on: 25 Sep 2013, 23:38 »

there are a few other sites I wish woould take this to heart, especially news outlets. 
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ackblom12

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #79 on: 26 Sep 2013, 18:39 »

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #80 on: 07 Oct 2013, 06:20 »

I think I've been around here too long, when I saw the headline for this article about the biology Nobel Prize and thought they were studying something completely different than what they were.  :psyduck:
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #81 on: 08 Oct 2013, 01:53 »

Watch out, jellyfish. JEROS, the jellyfish-destroying robot, is coming for you. Or possibly making more of you.

Developed by a team of engineers in Korea, JEROS is a robot designed for destroying jellyfish swarms, like the one that recently clogged the cooling pipes at a nuclear power plant in Sweden, temporarily shutting down the plant.

JEROS stands for Jellyfish Elimination Robotic Swarm, and it uses a camera and GPS system to spot jellyfish swarms underwater and maneuver autonomously toward them. A net underneath the robot gathers the gelatinous creatures, and a special propeller attached to the robot pulverizes the netted jellies into a wispy jellyfish soup. (See the video above).

It was developed by professor Myung Hyun, at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology. According to a release from the institution, JEROS is estimated to be three times more economical than physically gathering the jellyfish in nets and hauling them out of the water.

But unfortunately, said Robert Condon, a research scientist with the Dauphin Island Sea Lab who studies jellyfish, JEROS the jellyfish-destruction robot may actually create more jellyfish.

 "Grinding up jellyfish is a quick fix if it is outside a nuclear power plant, but it doesn't stop the jellyfish from reproducing," he said. "What it probably does is enable more jellyfish to be in a single area.

While the grinder may kill the jellyfish, it is likely not a fine enough grind to destroy the jellyfish's eggs and sperm, said Condon.

"Effectively you are mixing up all the egg and sperm in one spot and increasing the chance of them finding each other," he said. "If it is designed to stop a bloom in a particular area, it won't do that."


YouTube video shows JEROS, the Jellyfish Elimination Robotic Swarm, shredding jellyfish on a test run.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #82 on: 08 Oct 2013, 05:57 »

I HATE JELLYFISH

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #83 on: 13 Oct 2013, 05:21 »

I'd hate to be those jellyfish.

I Fucking Love Science comes to youtube!
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #85 on: 13 Oct 2013, 13:49 »

That article reads like genuine Star Trek technobabble, but this other article does a better job of describing it. Still, this is pretty weird.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #86 on: 13 Oct 2013, 15:01 »

:psyduck:

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #87 on: 13 Oct 2013, 15:04 »

Hey, I haven't got my head around quantum entanglement of widely spaced particles yet...
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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #88 on: 13 Oct 2013, 15:07 »

I don't think anyone has yet, Paul.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #89 on: 13 Oct 2013, 15:10 »

The concept isn't very hard to understand. The analogy of traffic flow is a good one. If you cause the cars on the back to slow down, and the cars on the front to speed up, something could cross the road through the gap safely. If you ask the drivers if they hit anything on the way, they will say no. If the traffic flow was constant, you would conclude that nothing had crossed the road at any point, which is incorrect: only nobody noticed it crossing the road.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #90 on: 13 Oct 2013, 15:11 »

Yeah, this one is easy by comparison...

I don't think anyone has yet, Paul.

Physics is like that.  That's probably behind why in my second term I changed my university course from Physics to Engineering Science (not that I didn't have to study quantum properties of materials for that as well).
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"Being human, having your health; that's what's important."  (from: Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi )
"As long as we're all living, and as long as we're all having fun, that should do it, right?"  (from: The Eccentric Family )

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #91 on: 14 Oct 2013, 01:52 »

guys, this thread makes me go
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LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #92 on: 14 Oct 2013, 05:08 »

Perhaps you should consult an entomologist.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #93 on: 14 Oct 2013, 17:14 »

The chemical composition of gas giants like Saturn and Jupiter leads astronomers to believe that it rains diamonds over there.

Before you blast off in a spaceship to harvest them, you should maybe listen to James May, who explains why diamonds are expensive.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #94 on: 18 Nov 2013, 11:34 »

MinutePhysics has started posting videos that explain physics in ten seconds.


There's also this:

Chilly temperatures foster cancer growth in mice.

Sometimes science overlooks the simplest influencing factors.
« Last Edit: 18 Nov 2013, 13:55 by LTK »
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

Case

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #95 on: 18 Nov 2013, 16:18 »

My daughter's a Taylor Swift fan, so we found this one enlightening. 
...
They do a bunch of others - find your favorite!

Oh, but you don't knowledge beautifull!
 :-)
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"Freedom is always the freedom of the dissenter" - Rosa Luxemburg
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GarandMarine

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #96 on: 18 Nov 2013, 16:47 »

Hey guys. Can someone explain spooky motion at a distance to me?
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I built the walls that make my life a prison, I built them all and cannot be forgiven... ...Sold my soul to carry your vendetta, So let me go before you can regret it, You've made your choice and now it's come to this, But that's price you pay when you're a monster with no name.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #97 on: 22 Nov 2013, 04:36 »

You mean quantum entanglement? I don't think anyone can.

The author of the comic I posted above is involved with Stated Clearly, which is Evolution for Dummies. It's very helpful as an introduction:

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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.

celticgeek

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Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #98 on: 22 Nov 2013, 07:10 »

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a 'dèanamh nan saighdean airson cinneadh MacLeòid
We Wear Woad When We Write Code
Ní féidir liom labhairt na Gaeilge.
Seachd reultan, agus seachd clachan, agus aon chraobh geal.

LTK

Re: Everybody Loves Science!
« Reply #99 on: 17 Dec 2013, 15:54 »

Workouts are no antidote to death by desk job

To summarise: Research has shown that exercising increases your life expectancy, but also that the inverse is true: sitting down for extended periods of time is actively shortening your life, even if you're also getting your 30 minutes of exercise in addition. And modern jobs and lifestyles are increasingly requiring a sedentary position, which does not bode well for our long-term health. The article also discusses the effect of regular (as in, two minutes per hour) exercise on glucose metabolism, which is relevant because type 2 diabetes is also an increasing risk factor in modern lifestyles. Two minutes of exercise for every hour you're sitting down has a positive effect on your insulin sensitivity compared to no exercise, which translates into an improved ability to metabolise fat instead of glucose, a lowered risk of Alzheimer's disease, as well as other generalised health benefits that my dad keeps harping on about.

I think I'll start setting a one-hour timer for walking up and down some stairs to work on this.
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Quote from: snalin
I just got the image of a midwife and a woman giving birth swinging towards each other on a trapeze - when they meet, the midwife pulls the baby out. The knife juggler is standing on the floor and cuts the umbilical cord with a a knifethrow.
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