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Author Topic: Martial arts: theory and practice  (Read 7219 times)

Taekwondoin

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #50 on: 09 Apr 2014, 15:24 »

I can't believe I missed this thread.

I'm a 2nd Dan black belt in ITF Taekwondo, as well as holding a 1st Dan in Kukkiwon Taekwondo, I also practice Judo and have reached 1st Kyu and am currently building points towards my 1st Dan in that too. I've trained in Taekwondo since I was 5, I had a break from the age of 17 to 21, then took it up again, and I've learnt underneath this instructor for the last 7 years.

Martial arts is great for self defence, because someone who practices it fully will know when to get the hell out of a situation before it becomes violent. Verbal de-escalation should also be taught, talking your way out of a situation in a calm and controlled manner devoid of threats. If it does come to fisticuffs, well as long as you realise that fending off an attack is not the same as sparring then I always find it prudent to remember that the fight usually leaves people after 30 seconds, that's a long time to receive some damage, but if it's truly 1 on 1, then it's not a lot of time to evade attack, space allowing. It's also worth remembering that one good connect will end a fight, that's both you as the defender giving the attack, or receiving it. Sometimes no amount of training will prepare you for that one punch to the gut that they somehow just manage to connect just right.

In terms of actually applying any of this, well the last fight I got into (and only fight as an adult) was three years ago, and after a lot of being pushed around and basically trying to back out, I lashed out at his knee and then used an open palm under his chin and pretty much threw the guy to the floor. He hit a flowerpot on the way down and passed out cold, the police got involved, there were a lot of witnesses to say that I acted in self defence, so I was let off any charges, but for that split second before he came around again I thought I'd killed him (adrenaline does some weird things to your head) and I can honestly say that was the worst point in my entire life. Fortunately, martial arts has also given me some of the highest points too.
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Lupercal

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #51 on: 10 Apr 2014, 16:18 »



So June last year I was asking about Aikido. I joined my local club and am now 5th Kyu (yellow belt). I do love Aikido, the way we train actually has a fair few real-world applications too. What I'm doing above as uke is a chest level punch, and my partner (3rd Dan) will soon hug my head to his shoulder, turn his hips, and throw me to the floor. This was from a training session where we did some Aiki-Jujitsu type training, as we just graded last week. Tomorrow I'm heading off for a week long training camp with the club, which should be great fun. The club also does Kendo every other week, and it's improving my knowledge of form very well (especially wrist cuts and extensions).

The club instructor was clear to warn me that I'm now in the more dangerous part of my training - I know enough to have confidence but my form needs refining. I still have trouble rolling properly, something that comes with practice I believe. Roll on orange belt!
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Akima

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #52 on: 11 Apr 2014, 02:58 »

Today, my wife learned that it's not "Rathburt's tail", it's "grasp birds tail".
The picturesque (and often variable) names of some taiji (tai-chi) forms can be a bit of a barrier to new students, but your wife's shifu should really have provided a written sheet or chart.
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GarandMarine

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #53 on: 11 Apr 2014, 03:42 »

The only set we had that my sensei gave a more "old school" style name to was something I think he stole from an anime or manga "Monkey Snatches Peach" and that was only because you can't just out and out say "Rip the opponents balls off" if there are parents or younger students around.
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BeoPuppy

Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #54 on: 11 Apr 2014, 14:08 »

[...]
 What I'm doing above as uke is a chest level punch, and my partner (3rd Dan) will soon hug my head to his shoulder, turn his hips, and throw me to the floor.
[...]
Irimi-Nage. I'm just not very good with Irimi. The omote versions are okay, but the left ura is soooo bad.

Still, aikido is fun!
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The Seldom Killer

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #55 on: 09 Jun 2014, 14:28 »

The Grandmaster is visiting from China so I headed over to Manchester for a seminar. It was really good to meet my teacher's teacher. Genuinely lovely guy and very open and free with his time and knowledge. We didn't do a lot with Qigong as there was a lot of demand from the Wing Chun students. Really impressive to watch the sparing at the end though.
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Akima

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #56 on: 14 Nov 2014, 17:11 »


I think this is rather awesome. Of course I would tend to identify with the massed ranks of volley-firing crossbowmen who ought to be shooting back, but that is a discussion more appropriate to the military history thread.
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GarandMarine

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #57 on: 15 Nov 2014, 21:30 »

Horse cavalry and Horse archers have proven quite damaging to massed rank ANYTHING. Including crossbowmen and archers.


Cav up!
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hedgie

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #58 on: 15 Nov 2014, 21:34 »

Still, there's the whole "shoal of fish" idea in play.  A single archer, or maybe even a few dozen on horses may do a lot of damage, but are individually more likely to become all corpseified than anyone in the massed ranks, since some other poor fucker is likely to get hit instead.
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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #59 on: 16 Nov 2014, 02:22 »


I also did a couple years in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (you couldn't guess right?) which is jokingly referred to as "Semper Fu". Unfortunately I find MCMAP to be extremely lacking in actual hand to hand combat training like the old Lion system, while you can learn some fighting stuff here, it's mostly an excuse for hazing and extremely brutal PT, least in my area.

The official purpose of the MCMAP and similar unarmed combat training from other branches and armed forces is A) PT and B)Instilling aggression.  Actually using it to fight is somewhere around G, because they figure that if you're in a military situation and you're unarmed, you're pretty much fucked anyway.
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GarandMarine

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #60 on: 16 Nov 2014, 07:25 »

No shit? :D

Holy crap. Almost like I spent a significant amount of time in the system, managed the training program and even taught the stuff occasionally! Further it's almost like this thread is about actual martial arts, so while Mcslap is worth mentioning in my experiences, pointing out that it's completely lacking in actual useful hand to hand training is probably relevant.

You're wrong though. As presently instructed A. is sanctioned hazing B. is PT and C is instilling aggression. D. is making hasty excuses for A-C by saying you're training Marines to handle any situation whether you're out in town on liberty or actually in the fight. Actual combat skills is probably somewhere around R. Simply because that's all the levels of administrative bullshit you have to get through.
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I built the walls that make my life a prison, I built them all and cannot be forgiven... ...Sold my soul to carry your vendetta, So let me go before you can regret it, You've made your choice and now it's come to this, But that's price you pay when you're a monster with no name.

Akima

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #61 on: 16 Nov 2014, 14:05 »

Horse cavalry and Horse archers have proven quite damaging to massed rank ANYTHING. Including crossbowmen and archers.
Yes indeed, but I was speaking of cultural identification rather than commenting on the effectiveness of cavalry or horse archers. Mounted steppe peoples were a constant pressure on China for thousands of years. Sometimes they conquered us (Mongols, Manchu), sometimes we conquered them (Han, Qing), often it went back and forth for centuries. But it is beyond the scope of this thread to discuss the combined arms tactics with which China's armies faced peoples who were, on average, much better horsemen than we were.

I don't know much about MCMAP. I had the impression that it was mainly a grappling-based system, but I just read the Wikipedia article and I'm not so sure. Coloured belts are lame though; It should be enough to receive a grudging nod from your sifu. If you're lucky, and he's feeling generous.
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GarandMarine

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #62 on: 16 Nov 2014, 14:39 »

It's one of the reasons I prefer the LINE system. No belts. No bullshit. No extraneous crap. It is a highly efficient system for dishing lethal force on an opponent in hand to hand combat. Mcslap has just made us weaker, especially with turning it into a haze fest and removing any potentially useful martial arts training from it. MCMAP itself is one of the many hybrid martial arts styles that can be found out in the world, much like my own primary style, Universal Kempo. MCMAP itself is kinda all over the place, without any real grounding in it's style beyond Japanese karate and I believe Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu with an ungodly amount of other things mixed in for flavor, which I happen to think is a good thing. MCMAP has a lot of potential as a program, but with current implementation it will never be successful as a hand to hand training tool.
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I built the walls that make my life a prison, I built them all and cannot be forgiven... ...Sold my soul to carry your vendetta, So let me go before you can regret it, You've made your choice and now it's come to this, But that's price you pay when you're a monster with no name.

Akima

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #63 on: 07 Dec 2014, 13:40 »

I initially posted in reply to J in the Pointless thread, but it didn't really belong there, so...
The imbecile in the beige coat is an example of the reason I don't generally tell people that I practice a martial art; idiots want to "try it on". What was he thinking? And however much he deserved it, that head-kick would not qualify as self-defence in Australia, and the soldier (I assume) could find himself in serious trouble. :-(
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LeeC

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #64 on: 19 Jan 2015, 19:35 »

A video about half swording.
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Sorflakne

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Re: Martial arts: theory and practice
« Reply #65 on: 26 Jan 2015, 16:14 »

Another year and a half before I can start cut and thrust training with my SCA group (they require at least two years certification with rapier).  I want to learn I.33, but the main CnT instructor in our group is encouraging me to go Bolognese, which is a later period style, but we'll see what happens in 2016.  I mainly want to do sword and buckler, but longsword is also included, so I'll be picking that up as well.  Sword and buckler goes something like this:

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LeeC

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