Jeph Jacques's comics discussion forums

  • 21 Apr 2019, 09:44
  • Welcome, Guest
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Pages: 1 ... 17 18 [19]   Go Down

Author Topic: English is weird  (Read 97813 times)

Tova

Re: English is weird
« Reply #900 on: 19 Mar 2019, 16:09 »

Does it bother anyone else when someone says or writes "All of a sudden" instead of "Suddenly" when conveying a story?

Not really. You are generally better off conveying a sudden event implicitly through your prose than by explicitly saying so via either of the expressions above.
Logged
"There is no expedient to which a man will not resort to avoid the real labor of thinking." - Sir Joshua Reynolds (paraphrased)

JoeCovenant

  • Scrabble hacker
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,348
Re: English is weird
« Reply #901 on: 20 Mar 2019, 01:22 »

Does it bother anyone else when someone says or writes "All of a sudden" instead of "Suddenly" when conveying a story?

If it's being used as dialogue, then nit a problem.
But if part of the prose/narration, then editors HATE that word...
Logged
Covenant
A Man With Far Too Much Time On His Hands

oddtail

  • Psychopath in a hockey mask
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 615
Re: English is weird
« Reply #902 on: 20 Mar 2019, 02:13 »

I'm confused. I was under the impression that "all of a sudden" is correct. What's wrong with the expression?
Logged

pwhodges

  • Admin emeritus
  • Awakened
  • *
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 15,880
  • I'll only say this once...
    • My home page
Re: English is weird
« Reply #903 on: 20 Mar 2019, 02:27 »

Agreed - it's a perfectly natural idiom to me, expressing more surprise and drama than a simple suddenly.
Logged
"Being human, having your health; that's what's important."  (from: Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi )
"As long as we're all living, and as long as we're all having fun, that should do it, right?"  (from: The Eccentric Family )

Tova

Re: English is weird
« Reply #904 on: 20 Mar 2019, 02:40 »

Grammatically, it's perfectly fine.

Then there's "all of the sudden." TIL.
Logged
"There is no expedient to which a man will not resort to avoid the real labor of thinking." - Sir Joshua Reynolds (paraphrased)

Morituri

  • Bling blang blong blung
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1,192
Re: English is weird
« Reply #905 on: 20 Mar 2019, 13:03 »

I'm just going to take a moment here to mourn the loss of the word "elite" - which used to designate those distinguished by their great capability - as opposed to "privileged" which used to designate those distinguished by their position in society. 

Now that it has been co-opted as part of a narrative about privileged people abusing their positions, we have a diminished capacity for talking about the great athletes, the geniuses, the autodidacts and original thinkers, the disciplined students, the insightful and enlightened, and those of great spirit, generosity, and character.  Or at least for talking about them in a way that doesn't begin with casting them in suspicion of having and abusing undeserved social standing.
Logged

Tova

Re: English is weird
« Reply #906 on: 22 Mar 2019, 20:05 »

Momentarily means for a moment, not in a moment, you barbarians. Try presently.
Logged
"There is no expedient to which a man will not resort to avoid the real labor of thinking." - Sir Joshua Reynolds (paraphrased)

pecoros7

  • Bizarre cantaloupe phobia
  • **
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 224
  • She/her or they/them
Re: English is weird
« Reply #907 on: 29 Mar 2019, 19:21 »

Momentarily means for a moment, not in a moment, you barbarians. Try presently.

"Ladies and gentlemen, we will be landing momentarily, so please prepare to unboard the plane as quickly as possible. We will not be coming to a full stop."

I'm just going to take a moment here to mourn the loss of the word "elite" - which used to designate those distinguished by their great capability - as opposed to "privileged" which used to designate those distinguished by their position in society. 

Now that it has been co-opted as part of a narrative about privileged people abusing their positions, we have a diminished capacity for talking about the great athletes, the geniuses, the autodidacts and original thinkers, the disciplined students, the insightful and enlightened, and those of great spirit, generosity, and character.  Or at least for talking about them in a way that doesn't begin with casting them in suspicion of having and abusing undeserved social standing.

As adjectives, we still have "exemplary", "exceptional", "foremost", "preeminent" and "supreme". and for the noun we have "exemplar", "elect", "choice", "cream" and "top". English is replete with words to say very nearly the same thing.
Logged

Is it cold in here?

  • Administrator
  • Awakened
  • ******
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 18,889
  • He/him/his pronouns
Re: English is weird
« Reply #908 on: 30 Mar 2019, 14:09 »

Logged
"Non-compliance is a social skill"
Quote from: an unnamed minister's sermon
In your face, darkness!  We are the light and we outnumber you!
Pages: 1 ... 17 18 [19]   Go Up