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Author Topic: The military history thread  (Read 11417 times)

GarandMarine

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The military history thread
« on: 03 Mar 2014, 04:25 »

Your morning dose of girl power:


"The Nazis called them 'Night Witches' because the whooshing noise their plywood and canvas airplanes made reminded the Germans of the sound of a witch’s broomstick. The Russian women who piloted those planes, onetime crop dusters, took it as a compliment. In 30,000 missions over four years, they dumped 23,000 tons of bombs on the German invaders, ultimately helping to chase them back to Berlin. Any German pilot who downed a 'witch' was awarded an Iron Cross.

These young heroines, all volunteers and most in their teens and early 20s, became legends of World War II but are now largely forgotten. Flying only in the dark, they had no parachutes, guns, radios or radar, only maps and compasses. If hit by tracer bullets, their planes would burn like sheets of paper."

So begins a NY Times tribute to one of the most famous "Night Witches," Nadezhda Popova, pictured here. Popova, who flew 852 missions during the war, passed away this past year at the age of 91. To read more about her incredible story, visit http://nyti.ms/JbnOMC

While there aren't any books available for young readers about these courageous women, there are several books for older readers about the role of Russian women combat pilots during WWII including "Flying for Her Country: The American and Soviet Women Military Pilots of World War II" (http://amzn.to/1mTMad9), "Wings, Women, and War: Soviet Airwomen in World War II Combat" (http://amzn.to/1fyPOs8), "A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II" (http://amzn.to/1jJb79N), "Red Sky, Black Death: A Soviet Woman Pilot's Memoir of the Eastern Front" (http://amzn.to/NhxvM4).

For an excellent documentary for ages 10 and up about the WASPs, the American women flyers of WWII, check out "Fly Girls," at http://www.amightygirl.com/american-experience-fly-girls

For more true stories of courageous women heroes of WWII, check out the inspiring book for ages 13 and up "Women Heroes of World War II: 26 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue" at http://www.amightygirl.com/women-heroes-of-world-war-ii

For two highly recommended novels, both for ages 13 and up, about women resistance fighters of WWII, check out "Code Name Verity" (http://www.amightygirl.com/code-name-verity) and "Rose Under Fire" (http://www.amightygirl.com/rose-under-fire).

For stories for all ages about girls and women living through the WWII period, visit our "WWII / Holocaust" section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/history-biography/history-world?cat=186

And, to introduce your kids to more famous female flyers like Amelia Earhart, Bessie Coleman, and Harriet Quimby, visit A Mighty Girl's "Planes" section at http://www.amightygirl.com/books/general-interest/transportation?cat=129
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #1 on: 04 Mar 2014, 14:05 »

Nadezhda Popova got an obituary in The Economist last year too.

In the interests of balance: Hanna Reitsch. Such courage and skill is worthy of acknowledgement, even in the service of so vile a cause.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #2 on: 04 Mar 2014, 14:20 »

There's a number of famous Nazi heroes who's exploits and skill as soldiers and warriors I quite admire. Much as I despise their politics.

I have two regrets about Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. 1. I never got to meet the man, and 2. That he wasn't on our side.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #3 on: 04 Mar 2014, 18:14 »

Rommel was one of their better Officers in many respects, but there is the school of thought that his reputation may have been blown out off proportion.  Probably the same could be said for people on both sides, Monty and Patton come to mind.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #4 on: 04 Mar 2014, 19:17 »

Having read his book I quite disagree, I'd also say his actions with the 7th Panzer during the Blitzkrieg (his first EVER armor/cav command) speak for themselves to say nothing of the DAK. I'm also remembering the statistic that no unit under his command was ever accused of a war crime, and Rommel himself didn't join the NSDAP until he was forced to as part of his promotion to Field Marshal.
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BeoPuppy

Re: The military history thread
« Reply #5 on: 04 Mar 2014, 23:26 »

He just helped create the opportunity for the nazi's to commit genocide. He might not have been a big nazi himself but he sure did nothing to oppose them. May his name and memory be erased form history.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #6 on: 05 Mar 2014, 02:43 »

Not likely, as the US Army is fond of quoting him in doctrine.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #7 on: 05 Mar 2014, 05:03 »

Genghis Khan was a literal monster that would make Hitler wet his frilly lace undergarments and he's still around. Also liberally quoted and ripped off in U.S. Combat Doctrine (Maneuver Warfare? ALL OF THAT is based off tactics of the Mongols)
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #8 on: 05 Mar 2014, 07:40 »

There are plenty of examples of brave men and women who fought well for bad causes. For example, I have a fascination for the Confederate Navy - they came up with some truly innovative ship designs, largely out of necessity as they were building their navy almost entirely from scratch. And yes, the cause they served was a terrible one. That doesn't mean they should be erased from history.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #9 on: 05 Mar 2014, 09:12 »

How about Lt Gen Lewis "Chesty" Puller?  The guy has basically attained mythic status in the Marine Corps.  How the hell do we not have a movie or miniseries about him yet?
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #10 on: 05 Mar 2014, 09:17 »

basically? Fuck that. The man is the Marine equivalent of a Catholic Saint. If not Jesus himself. Chesty's shown up in a couple pieces of media, but generally I think it's a fear thing. If you get it right you're golden. If you get it wrong you're going to piss off the entire Marine Corps.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #11 on: 05 Mar 2014, 11:08 »

yeah. Hollyweird aint got the guts to do a Chesty Puller movie... especially not with 20,000 Marines within driving distance.


LOL.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #12 on: 05 Mar 2014, 13:25 »

On the other hand, some people deserve their reputations.


Sepp Deitrich.  Brilliant Tank commander, thorough going Nazi bastard.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #13 on: 05 Mar 2014, 17:32 »

Otto Carius totally deserves his rep. Hans Ulrich Rudel too. The former was not a Nazi, though he fought for the Reich... the latter says he wasn't but considering he headed to Argentina... *shrug*
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #14 on: 05 Mar 2014, 22:20 »

A friendly reminder from Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #16 on: 24 Mar 2014, 16:26 »

With a rebel yell, she cries more, more, more....
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #17 on: 24 Mar 2014, 22:35 »

Just incase you didn't know, THe IL2 was the aircraft flown by the women in the OP.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #18 on: 25 Mar 2014, 04:10 »

The 588th Night Bomber Regiment (Night Witches) did not fly the IL-2 Shturmovik fighter bomber but rather Po-2 biplanes.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #19 on: 25 Mar 2014, 08:33 »

IIRC, they also killed their engines as they approached their targets to increase the element of surprise, and then fired them up after dropping their payloads and got out before AA could respond.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #20 on: 25 Mar 2014, 09:07 »

Yep, that's where the Night Witches label came from, the whispering canvas sounded like a witch's broom.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #21 on: 25 Mar 2014, 15:44 »

God damn that made me shiver just reading that. Fucking terrifying.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #22 on: 30 May 2014, 04:26 »

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #23 on: 30 May 2014, 11:40 »

Today in history...
30 May 1431:  At Rouen in English-controlled Normandy, Joan of Arc, the peasant girl who became the savior of France, is burned at the stake for heresy.

Joan was born in 1412, the daughter of a tenant farmer at Domremy, on the borders of the duchies of Bar and Lorraine. In 1415, the Hundred Years War between England and France entered a crucial phase when the young King Henry V of England invaded France and won a series of decisive victories against the forces of King Charles VI. By the time of Henry's death in August 1422, the English and their French-Burgundian allies controlled Aquitaine and most of northern France, including Paris. Charles VI, long incapacitated, died one month later, and his son, Charles, regent from 1418, prepared to take the throne. However, Reims, the traditional city of French coronation, was held by the Anglo-Burgundians, and the Dauphin (heir apparent to the French throne) remained uncrowned. Meanwhile, King Henry VI of England, the infant son of Henry V and Catherine of Valois, the daughter of Charles VI, was proclaimed king of France by the English.

Joan's village of Domremy lay on the frontier between the France of the Dauphin and that of the Anglo-Burgundians. In the midst of this unstable environment, Joan began hearing "voices" of three Christian saints—St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret. When she was about 16, these voices exhorted her to aid the Dauphin in capturing Reims and therefore the French throne. In May 1428, she traveled to Vaucouleurs, a stronghold of the Dauphin, and told the captain of the garrison of her visions. Disbelieving the young peasant girl, he sent her home. In January 1429, she returned, and the captain, impressed by her piety and determination, agreed to allow her passage to the Dauphin at Chinon.

Dressed in men's clothes and accompanied by six soldiers, she reached the Dauphin's castle at Chinon in February 1429 and was granted an audience. Charles hid himself among his courtiers, but Joan immediately picked him out and informed him of her divine mission. For several weeks, Charles had Joan questioned by theologians at Poitiers, who concluded that, given his desperate straits, the Dauphin would be well-advised to make use of this strange and charismatic girl.

Charles furnished her with a small army, and on April 27, 1429, she set out for Orleans, besieged by the English since October 1428. On April 29, as a French sortie distracted the English troops on the west side of Orleans, Joan entered unopposed by its eastern gate. She brought greatly needed supplies and reinforcements and inspired the French to a passionate resistance. She personally led the charge in several battles and on May 7 was struck by an arrow. After quickly dressing her wound, she returned to the fight, and the French won the day. On May 8, the English retreated from Orleans.

During the next five weeks, Joan and the French commanders led the French into a string of stunning victories over the English. On July 16, the royal army reached Reims, which opened its gates to Joan and the Dauphin. The next day, Charles VII was crowned king of France, with Joan standing nearby holding up her standard: an image of Christ in judgment. After the ceremony, she knelt before Charles, joyously calling him king for the first time.

On September 8, the king and Joan attacked Paris. During the battle, Joan carried her standard up to the earthworks and called on the Parisians to surrender the city to the king of France. She was wounded but continued to rally the king's troops until Charles ordered an end to the unsuccessful siege. That year, she led several more small campaigns, capturing the town of Saint-Pierre-le-Moitier. In December, Charles ennobled Joan, her parents, and her brothers.

In May 1430, the Burgundians laid siege to Compiegne, and Joan stole into the town under the cover of darkness to aid in its defense. On May 23, while leading a sortie against the Burgundians, she was captured. The Burgundians sold her to the English, and in March 1431 she went on trial before ecclesiastical authorities in Rouen on charges of heresy. Her most serious crime, according to the tribunal, was her rejection of church authority in favor of direct inspiration from God. After refusing to submit to the church, her sentence was read on May 24: She was to be turned over to secular authorities and executed. Reacting with horror to the pronouncement, Joan agreed to recant and was condemned instead to perpetual imprisonment.

Ordered to put on women's clothes, she obeyed, but a few days later the judges went to her cell and found her dressed again in male attire. Questioned, she told them that St. Catherine and St. Margaret had reproached her for giving in to the church against their will. She was found to be a relapsed heretic and on May 29 ordered handed over to secular officials. On May 30, Joan, 19 years old, was burned at the stake at the Place du Vieux-Marche in Rouen. Before the pyre was lit, she instructed a priest to hold high a crucifix for her to see and to shout out prayers loud enough to be heard above the roar of the flames.

As a source of military inspiration, Joan of Arc helped turn the Hundred Years War firmly in France's favor. By 1453, Charles VII had reconquered all of France except for Calais, which the English relinquished in 1558. In 1920, Joan of Arc, one of the great heroes of French history, was recognized as a Christian saint by the Roman Catholic Church. Her feast day is May 30.

Thank you, History Channel:  http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history
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Pilchard123

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #24 on: 30 May 2014, 16:01 »

By 1453, Charles VII had reconquered all of France except for Calais, which

...had grown a moustache and dyed its hair, making it difficult for him to find.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #25 on: 30 May 2014, 16:05 »

Thanks Groggy! Joan was my patron saint when I was still Catholic.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #26 on: 30 May 2014, 16:51 »

Loath as I am to link the O'Reilly factor this clip is just kinda sad. http://www.ijreview.com/2014/05/142510-memorial-day-reporter-asks-beachgoers-military-history-questions-answers-appalling/
It is sad that America's education system has so obviously failed some young people, but judging these no-doubt-edited answers as "appalling" (see the URL), is heavily freighted with what Mr. O'Reilly presumably thinks is worth knowing. I wonder, for example, if that smug douche with the microphone knows after whom the chemical element Meitnerium is named*, or if he could reel off an explanation of Avogadro's Law if put on the spot on his day off? If he could not do these things, would he be more or less "appalling" than the people he and Mr. O'Reilly decided to hold up to ridicule?

(click to show/hide)

I was struck by the provincialism of the questions too. To "Who won the Civil War?" I would have answered "Which one? If you mean the American Civil War, the Union won". To me, "the Civil War" was won by Mao Zedong's Communists. Despite being foreign to the USA, I had no difficulty answering the questions correctly, but I wonder if microphone-man could as accurately give an account of major events of the Second Sino-Japanese War, or of the Battle of Milne Bay, for example.

Edit: Thinking about that clip again, the question "Who won the Cold War?", to which apparently the correct answer is "We did!", exhibits even worse parochialism than the American Civil War question since "we" apparently means America. "Which dictator did the US topple in Iraq?" is another example. Australian servicemen died in the Cold War conflicts in Korea and Vietnam, for example, and served in Iraq (as did those from other members of the "Coalition of the Willing"), and yet O'Reilly's narrative airbrushes out the contribution of the USA's allies in both conflicts. That is a particularly dubious view in the case of the Cold War, which was a long-term military/economic/political contest between large multinational alliances, each headed by a superpower.

I suppose the idea is that one should be educated well enough to parrot a cartoon version of history, but not enough to recognise that that is what it is. Yes, I know, it's Bill O'Reilly... I suppose I should not expect too much.
« Last Edit: 30 May 2014, 19:07 by Akima »
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #27 on: 31 May 2014, 04:30 »

Asking Americans questions in America, one can reasonably infer that one is asking about American history. If you were canvassing in Shanghai the Civil War would of course refer to China's, as would any give revolution, so if you wanted to ask about the American, French or Bolshevik (Russian) revolutions you'd specify. Similarly our Civil War is the "Civil War" (or the War Between the States/War of Northern Aggression depending on where in the area you are) and the revolution is simply the revolution of the war of independence. We have no need to clarify because it's our history. If we're talking about the October or French revolutions we too will clarify. With some small exception in certain Irish neighborhoods where the various Irish Rebellions and Revolutions are talked about in a similar manner over pints and toasting the 'Ra. (and not even that much of that any more, 9/11 cost the remnants of the IRA a lot of the last of their dwindling Irish-American support, that said remanents are just drugging running gangsters now doesn't help them either)

I thought the "We Did" as a "correct" response was more or less a "pity, correct" then any indication of actual rightness. Though the argument could be advanced that while Korea and Vietnam existed within the greater context of the war neither did much to "win" the cold war, but American defense spending, in "winning" the arms race broke the Soviet Union's financial back, enabling victory, meaning the U.S. "won" the Cold War.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #28 on: 31 May 2014, 19:33 »

I watched an Australian Lt. Col. beat a USMC major in a push up contest a few weeks ago.

as for the American education system?





please don't ask me to jump on that pulpit:  my blood pressure can't handle it.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #29 on: 02 Jun 2014, 18:33 »

Aren't you glad voter turnout is less than 50%?

Isn't it amazing there are no fat women at that beach?
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #30 on: 02 Jun 2014, 18:37 »

I used to think people for not voting.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #31 on: 02 Jun 2014, 19:28 »

So your the Telepath that keeps the turnout low huh?


:-D   ;)
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #32 on: 02 Jun 2014, 22:12 »

....yes. I take full credit for that. I think I deserve a medal of some kind for my selfless service.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #33 on: 03 Jun 2014, 14:04 »






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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #35 on: 05 Jun 2014, 22:23 »

0000  Universal Coordinated Time - 6 June 1944. Men of the American 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions, the British 6th Airborne division, Canadian 1st Parachute division, and other allied forces began their aerial drops across Europe spearheading one of the largest military operations in human history with other 17,000 paratroopers and glider troopers. They were badly scattered, hampered by mis drops in the dark and harsh weather, but their valiant efforts disrupted German command and control across Normandy, threw their forces into disarray and made possible the landings on the beaches that would come just a few short hours later.



Now. Play this on loud while reading the rest of this post.



On this day, 6 June, 1947, men of a host of Allied nations, united in Resistance to evil and tryanny in pre-dawn light and rough seas crossed the English channel towards the coast of France in what was to be the largest Amphibious invasion our world has ever seen. The British 1 Corps was assigned Juno and Sword beaches, with the 3rd Canadian Infantry, the loss of their brothers in the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, were assigned the assault on Juno, and the British 3rd Infantry Division assigned Sword. 30 Corps was assigned Gold beach, lead in by 50th Infantry Division. The American beaches, Utah and Omaha were divided between VII Corps, spearheaded by the 4th Infantry Division, and V Corps, led by the famous Big Red One (1st Infantry Division) and the 29th Infantry Division. Over 160,000 Allied soldiers landed on the beaches of Normandy, 6 June, 1944. Many would not return, with over four thousand men KIA, and at least six thousand more wounded on D-Day alone. They died to machine gun fire and to shelling, in vicious hand to hand, many not even making it out of their landing crafts. Still others drowned in the cold waters of the English Channels when their boats came up short, dragged down into the darkness by the weights of the packs they wore and the rifles they carried. By the end of the Battle of Normandy the Allies would sustain over 200,000 casualties, including 37,000 men killed in action. By their deeds and their blood, sacrificed upon the alter of combat, so began the first steps of freeing Europe from the Nazi jackboot. The road to victory in Europe was long and bloody, but in the end we must look back and consider, that so much of what we have today as a free world came down to a single day of fighting over six miles of beach in France. On this day, in silent memory, it is only right that we be grateful to the sacrifices that have been made so that we can live as we do.

"They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate." — President Franklin D. Roosevelt, radio broadcast, June 6, 1944

Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon a great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers in arms on other fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world... I have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full victory!
                                                 -Gen Dwight D. Eisenhower







And I shall end, once again, with the Green Fields of France.
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #36 on: 05 Jun 2014, 22:37 »

Seemingly Inspired by Akima's WW1 battlefield photo post earlier.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/d-day-landing-sites-then-now-normandy-beaches-1944-70-years-later-1450286

Today, as many around the world prepare to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the landings, pictures of tourists soaking up the sun on Normandy's beaches stand in stark contrast to images taken around the time of the invasion.

Reuters photographer Chris Helgren compiled archive pictures taken during the invasion and went back to the same places to photograph them as they appear today.

(Pictures in spoilers, so I don't kill the mobile users)

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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #37 on: 06 Jun 2014, 04:45 »

Good article here about Obscure facts about the Landings.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/the-filter/10874340/10-things-you-didnt-know-about-the-D-Day-landings.html

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1. Lieutenant James Doohan of the Winnipeg Rifles was shot in the hand and chest on D-Day. A silver cigarette case stopped the bullet to the chest, but the shot to his hand caused him to lose a finger.
Doohan later became known to generations of TV viewers as the actor who played Scottie in Star Trek. While on camera, he always tried to hide his injured hand.


2. Celebrated war photographer Robert Capa was in the second wave of troops to land at Omaha Beach. His pictures of the event are known as The Magnificent Eleven – a title that reflects their number. Despite taking two reels of film, totalling 106 pictures, only 11 survived after 16-year-old darkroom assistant Dennis Banks dried them at too high a temperature.

3. Juan Pujol was a double agent working for MI5, who helped convince the Germans that D-Day wouldn’t be in June. Bizarrely, his first code name was BOVRIL – but that was soon changed to GARBO as he was such a good actor. GARBO fooled the Germans so completely, Hitler awarded him the Iron Cross. As he was living in Hendon at the time, Pujol asked if they could post it to him.

4. On the morning of D-Day, J.D. Salinger landed on Omaha Beach with six chapters of his unfinished novel Catcher in the Rye in his backpack. In the afternoon, Evelyn Waugh, recuperating in Devon after injuring his leg in paratrooper training, finished the final chapter of his novel Brideshead Revisited.

5. The giant wall map used by General Eisenhower and General Montgomery at their HQ Southwick House was made by toy maker Chad Valley.

6. Lord Lovat led the British 1st Special Service Brigade. An inspiring but eccentric figure, he landed on Sword Beach wearing hunting brogues and carrying a wading stick used for salmon fishing.
Working as an adviser on the film The Longest Day, Lovat woke up in a taxi surrounded by German troops and instinctively dived out of the car, but then realised they were just extras.

7. On the morning of D-Day, the House of Commons debated whether office cleaners should no longer be called ‘charladies.’
8. News of D-Day reached POW camp Colditz via an illegal radio hidden in an attic. To avoid detection, the POWs used shoes with no tread that left no mark in the attic’s dust.

On hearing the news, POW Cenek Chaloupka vowed that if the war wasn’t over by December he’d run round the courtyard naked. On Christmas Eve 1944, Chaloupka ran round it twice. It was -7 degrees Celsius.

9. Like many troops, Lieutenant Herbert Jalland of the Durham Light Infantry ran onto Gold Beach wearing pyjamas underneath his battledress, in order to prevent chafing from his backpack.

10. General Montgomery helped mastermind D-Day, the largest invasion the world had ever seen. His diary entry for the day read: ‘Invaded Normandy; left Portsmouth 10.30.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #38 on: 06 Jun 2014, 19:40 »

My maternal grandfather was involved in D-Day, but never even made it to the beach.

the culprit?


The Sherman Dual Drive "Swimming" Tank, that didn't.
check out the 741st Tank Btln at Omaha Beach.
27 of 29 never made it ashore, most of which sank without ever taking fire.

Grandpa finally set foot on France about three days later with a brand new Sherman.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #39 on: 07 Jun 2014, 15:23 »

Probably the only place where the DD's were a total failure if memory serves.

I think they worked out there were two reasons they failed at Omaha

1) They wound up being launched too far out - more than 1000 yards sooner than they should have been

2) They got caught in a series of cross current waves which caused them to be swamped.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #40 on: 07 Jun 2014, 21:33 »

Additionally:
they were designed for wave action of 12"-18"
on D-Day, they faced waves of 5' - 6'

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #41 on: 08 Jun 2014, 12:27 »

Yes they were, but even so if you get hit by waves that come from one direction then suddenly hit you from another when you are not expecting it in something that, basically, has poor stability issues and seakeeping capabilities in the first place, it's going to cause you issues - let alone the fact they were launched father out than they should have been, it's no wonder they went under.

Remember, Omaha was the only Beach where none of the assigned DD Tanks in the first wave reached the shore on D-Day.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #42 on: 08 Jun 2014, 20:26 »

I know.
D-Day was one of the stories that Gpa didn't mind talking about.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #43 on: 19 Jun 2014, 15:58 »



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For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as an Automatic Rifleman with Company F, 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, 1st Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM on 21 November 2010. Lance Corporal Carpenter was a member of a platoon-sized coalition force, comprised of two reinforced Marine rifle squads partnered with an Afghan National Army squad. The platoon had established Patrol Base Dakota two days earlier in a small village in the Marjah District in order to disrupt enemy activity and provide security for the local Afghan population. Lance Corporal Carpenter and a fellow Marine were manning a rooftop security position on the perimeter of Patrol Base Dakota when the enemy initiated a daylight attack with hand grenades, one of which landed inside their sandbagged position. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for their own safety, Lance Corporal Carpenter moved toward the grenade in an attempt to shield his fellow Marine from the deadly blast. When the grenade detonated, his body absorbed the brunt of the blast, severely wounding him, but saving the live of his fellow Marine. By his undaunted courage, bold fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of almost certain death, Lance Corporal Carpenter reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service

Lance Corporals getting shit done.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #44 on: 19 Jun 2014, 17:59 »

He deserves every damn medal on his chest.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #45 on: 21 Jun 2014, 04:02 »

I hereby resolve to never feel like I'm having a bad day ever again, no matter how shit it gets.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #46 on: 21 Jun 2014, 08:13 »

That's the thing that strikes me most about Carpenter. Every photo he takes he's smiling. That's indomitable spirit right there. You can't kill that.

For questions about how the Corps treats our own please see the following link:
http://www.duffelblog.com/2014/06/kyle-carpenter-questions-medal-of-honor/

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1. Is there any advice you have for a young infantry lance corporal on how to make rank without actually throwing themselves on a piece of live ordnance?

2. What happened to your face? Do you blame Batman or Commissioner Gordon?

1. is just sad and true, it's a bitch for a Lance Corporal to get promoted in any MOS, but especially the infantry. 2, as well as the other 21 questions are just how we do. We're family and as such we're going to rip on you when you're okay, and shore you up when you aren't.

Cept this one:
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17. Have you ever caused a Victoria’s Secret store to collapse from the sheer mass of panties dropping all at once?

That's just a fact of life. Marine Corps Dress Blues. Ain't a thing in the world like'em.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #47 on: 22 Jun 2014, 23:10 »

I hereby resolve to never feel like I'm having a bad day ever again, no matter how shit it gets.
I'm simply happy that he is alive. I know that is a bit "motherhood", but...
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #48 on: 24 Jun 2014, 20:27 »


Quote
American soldiers, members of Maryland's 117th Trench Mortar Battery, operating a trench mortar. This gun and crew kept up a continuous fire throughout the raid of March 4, 1918 in Badonviller, Muerthe et Modselle, France.
Go Maryland.  I had no idea they were still using the different states to signify where the regiment was from like from the ACW.  Thought they intermixed everyone (as far as different states go).  Perhaps Maryland conscripts?  I'll have to look into it more.


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A German dog hospital, treating wounded dispatch dogs coming from the front, ca. 1918.


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The Salonica (Macedonian) front, Indian troops at a Gas mask drill. Allied forces joined with Serbs to battle armies of the Central Powers and force a stable front throughout most of the war.
You know, in school the Eastern front wasn't mentioned much.  Even if the Western front Allies sent troops over there.  The French and British sent many conscripted soldiers from southeast Asia and India to fight in what is today Macedonia, along with other theaters of war.


Some more photos from the Great War that started 100 years ago.

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Wars not make one great.- Yoda
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #49 on: 24 Jun 2014, 22:41 »


Quote
American soldiers, members of Maryland's 117th Trench Mortar Battery, operating a trench mortar. This gun and crew kept up a continuous fire throughout the raid of March 4, 1918 in Badonviller, Muerthe et Modselle, France.
Go Maryland.  I had no idea they were still using the different states to signify where the regiment was from like from the ACW.  Thought they intermixed everyone (as far as different states go).  Perhaps Maryland conscripts?  I'll have to look into it more.

Maryland Army National Guard actually. Which explains the state designator. It was only a battery (Company, so about 200 men) and was under the 42nd Infantry Division when they were activated for WW1.
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