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Author Topic: The military history thread  (Read 11616 times)

GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #50 on: 03 Aug 2014, 10:58 »

http://imgur.com/gallery/DGrzs

This is a pretty striking progression of military kit over the centuries.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #51 on: 03 Aug 2014, 18:13 »

Time to drop some motivation and knowledge on you fuckers with your warrior of the week good to go? This week's individual is another badass Suomi (Finnish if you're not paying attention) warrior man god from World War Two, because apparently the Finns invented that freaking daggone super soldier serum from the Captain America comics and standard putting it in formula bottles. Lauri Allan Törni was a soldier who fought under three flags for three different armies. Starting off as an officer of the Finnish national guard, Lauri started his career of stomping fresh mud holes into communists (especially Russians) during the Winter War, and continued on through the Continuation War.

Törni's fame was mostly made during the aforementioned Continuation War of 41-44 between the USSR and Finland, in 1943, as a young officer, Törni lead a deep penetration infantry unit informally named Detachment Törni, the unit and Törni's reputation for combat effectiveness was such that the Soviet Army had a bounty on Törni's head for three million Finnish marks. Törni received the Mannerheim Cross on 9 July 1944. In September 44 Finland struck a peace treaty with the Soviet Union, and much of the Finnish Army was demobilized, leaving Törni unemployed. He was recruited by a pro German resistance movement in Finland, and left for saboteur training in case Finland was later occupied by the Soviets, the training ended early in March of that year, and unable to secure transport home, Törni joined a German unit of the Waffen SS to continue feeding his thirst for Russian blood. He surrendered with his unit to American and British troops in the late stages of the war and returned to Finland in June 1945 after escaping a British POW camp.

Törni was arrested by the Finnish state police while attempting to rejoin his family in Helsinki, he escaped and was recaptured in April 1946, and tried for treason for joining the German army, he received a six year sentence in January 1947, and after a brief escape was granted a pardon in December 1948 by the Finnish President.

After a series of misadventures Törni ended up in the United States and joined the United States Army in 1954 under the name Larry Thorne. Private Thorne quickly found himself in Special Forces, (aka the Green Berets). Törni went to OCS and was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the Signal Corps in 1957, and received his regular commission and a promotion to Captain in 1960. During the late 50s and early 60s, Törni served with the 10th Special Forces Group in Germany before deploying to the Republic of Vietnam in 1963 to support Vietnamese forces there along with SFD A-734 (Special Forces Detachment, one of the famous "A teams"). Törni would go on to earn the Bronze Star medal and two Purple hearts during his first tour.

Törni's second tour in Vietnam began in February 1965 with the 5th Special Forces group. On 18 October 1965 while on a classified mission, his Vietnam Airforce CH-34 helicopter crashed in a mountainous area roughly twenty five miles from Da Nang. Rescue teams were unable to locate the crash site. Shortly after his disappearance Törni was promoted to the rank of Major.

Törni was listed as Missing In Action until a Joint Task Force-Full Accounting team located his remains in 1999 and repatriated to the United States following a ceremony at Hanoi's Noi Bai International Airport with the U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and Ambassador to Vietnam Pete Peterson. Törni was officially identified in 2003, and was buried with full military honors on 26 June 2003 at Arlington National Cemetery (section 60, Tombstone 8136 if you're in the area and want to visit).

So let's recap. Three armies, four wars and a chest full of metal and an absolutely legendary soldier, both in his homeland and in the United States, particularly in the Army Special Forces community. He has a building named after him, the Larry Thorne Headquarters Building, 10th SFG(A), Fort Carson, Colorado. 10th Group further honors him yearly by presenting the Larry Thorne Award to the best Operational Detachment-Alpha in the command.

Fucking motivating is not? Oh and Sabaton did a song celebrating his glorious ass kicking abilities which is always a nice bonus.

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #52 on: 04 Aug 2014, 16:34 »

British Terror Weapons of WW1

Ladies and Gentlemen, The Liven's Large Gallery flame Projector
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #53 on: 04 Aug 2014, 21:00 »

Whelp. I had to clean my shorts out. Fuckin'A.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGxP7F2GUwY

Here's a link to the full documentary that's from.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #54 on: 05 Aug 2014, 17:04 »

Yeah, was watching that on BBC Knowledge when I Posted the Vid.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #55 on: 05 Aug 2014, 20:10 »

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #56 on: 06 Aug 2014, 14:53 »

Marine Corps Special Operations Command is being renamed and realigned with the Marine Raider Battalions and Regiments of WW2.

http://www.oafnation.com/marines/2014/8/6/-marine-raidersrenamed

This is hardcore moto at it's finest.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #57 on: 06 Aug 2014, 19:01 »

6 AUG 1945.

first ever use of an Atomic bomb in anger.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki

69 years ago.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #58 on: 16 Sep 2014, 09:15 »

I've been watching a long WW1 documentary and came across the Battle of Tsingtao.  Tsingtao being a German naval base of operations in the pacific.  The Brits needed help and asked the growing power of Japan to ally with them in this battle.  On the 2nd of September 1914 the Japanese Imperial Army sent 60,000 troops to meet up with the 2,000 British troops to siege Tsingtao.  The Germans had around 4,500 troops.



The siege began on October 31st and for a solid week the Japanese battered the defenses of Tsingtao.  The Germans sneered at the British forces, making the Japanese do their dirty work.  During the victory parade through Tsingtao, German officers ordered their troops to turn their backs on the passing British forces.  The British high officer complained to the Japanese commander who replied "Well, we cannot repeat the whole procession because of that."  Capturing Tsingtao would be a spring board later for Japan's empire building.  Within weeks demanding territory and trading rights in China and gaining all of the German colonies and territories north of the equator.  Australia and New Zealand took the ones in the south. The Americans were not too happy about the British empowering the Japanese in the pacific.



The British were hoping to Neutralize the German fleet in the pacific but most of their cruisers got away and wreaked havoc on the seas.  The Kaiser gave them full authority to do what they wish, basically making them well armed privateers.

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #59 on: 16 Sep 2014, 16:26 »

The Americans were not too happy about the British empowering the Japanese in the pacific.
I think this is an ahistorical judgement made by peering through the lens of Pearl Harbour. There is little evidence that the US government had any real qualms about Japanese imperialism in China in 1914, or in 1917 when the Lancing-Ishii Agreement included the USA's acknowledgement of Japan's "special status" in China, or 1919 when Woodrow Wilson signed off on the Treaty of Versailles which, among its many iniquities, handed over a chunk of China to Imperial Japan.

I think it is also questionable to call the capture of Tsingtao (Qingdao now) the springboard for Japanese empire-building. I would look to the annexation of Korea, from which Japan launched its later invasion of China. Japan's "protectorate" over Korea was legitimised by the Treaty of Portsmouth (1905, full annexation followed in 1910) negotiated with the mediation of US President Theodore Roosevelt, who won a Nobel Peace Prize for his role. Irony.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #60 on: 17 Sep 2014, 08:23 »

The Americans were not too happy about the British empowering the Japanese in the pacific.
I think this is an ahistorical judgement made by peering through the lens of Pearl Harbour.
Quote
I think it is also questionable to call the capture of Tsingtao (Qingdao now) the springboard for Japanese empire-building.
Hehe the weird thing is, it was a British documentary.  :-P  But I do agree with everything you've stated.  Based off U.S. foreign policy of the time they probably didn't really give a damn.

As for Japan's Imperialism:
1) I think it amazing that the British even reached out to the Japanese but was not surprised they kept their troops in reserve.

2) I do not know much about the Japanese occupation/annexation of Korea, other than the treaties signed, but I remember reading that the need for Japanese expansion into Korea and Manchuria was for the raw materials needed to fuel their industrialization. Now I know that was their reason in 1931 to invade Manchuria, but I cannot find much on why they annexed Kora.  I forget if it was a raw material thing or setting up factories, gaining an agricultural area to feed the growing empire, or a combination of all 3. 

Imperialism from the mid 1800s to the end of WW2 is a bit of history that always fascinates me.  I would be lying if playing Victoria 2 didn't increase my curiosity, especially with Japan's industrialization and then imperialism (and China's attempt at westernization culminating into a few revolutions).  I remember back in college taking a Chinese Revolution class (that I had to drop due to a schedule conflict) that had its main book (forgot the name) and the first few chapters was talking about how the Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese westernized/modernized/industrialized and how their respective cultures either hindered or enhanced this change.  It was a really great read but I never got a chance to get beyond chapter 3 or 4 before i turned the book back in.

Long story short.  Yay history.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #61 on: 18 Sep 2014, 06:30 »

1) I think it amazing that the British even reached out to the Japanese but was not surprised they kept their troops in reserve.
Japan was Britain's ally at the time, and had declared war on Germany in August 1914. The British rather regarded Japan as the Great Britain of Asia. You know, plucky little island nation off the coast of a large continent, pioneer of industrialisation in its region, sea-faring people with a fine navy (substantially trained and equipped by Britain) and so on. When Admiral Togo attacked the Russian fleet at Port Arthur on 9th February 1904, his actions were favourably compared in London with the Royal Navy's attacks on the Danish fleet at Copenhagen during the Napoleonic War. Britain also has a long history of recruiting allies to make up for its own relatively small army, so what could be more natural viewed in the context of the time than that they should work with the Japanese?
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #62 on: 18 Sep 2014, 06:30 »

Side note: Have I mentioned how I love this thread isn't just me posting random military history blogs? <3
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #63 on: 18 Sep 2014, 08:33 »

@Akima: That is a fair way to put it.  :-D  It's no wonder they had such an empire at the time.  Honestly I would really like to learn more about British and French Imperialism but haven't  had the time or where to start.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #64 on: 07 Nov 2014, 14:37 »

Mountain pattern armor looks like a better alternative to chainmail.  Would love to see a video of how both stack up to a crossbow bolt hit.  Both are flexible but Mountain pattern doesn't have holes like chainmail.

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #65 on: 07 Nov 2014, 16:20 »

If anyone is wondering why that style of lamellar armour is called "mountain pattern", it is because the Chinese character meaning mountain is .
I do not know about its protective qualities.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #66 on: 07 Nov 2014, 16:27 »

Does look rather phallic, though.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #67 on: 07 Nov 2014, 20:45 »

Only slightly OT


Made in the day when they made Blockbusters with real extras.  Probably the closest live action sequence of a Legion deploying for battle I've ever seen.  Even Rome used CGI for it's battle sequences.  Made with the aid of the Spanish Army I believe.

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #68 on: 07 Nov 2014, 21:17 »

The Charge of the Light brigade/Waterloo is more epic imho
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #69 on: 07 Nov 2014, 22:14 »

Charge of the Light Brigade was at Balaclava, during the Crimean War. (1854)
Waterloo was 1815.

A distant relative of mine was Sir Lord James Scarlett.  Commander of the Heavy Brigade at Balaclava.
Commonly known as the guy who lead from the front and made his own initiative.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Balaclava#Charge_of_the_Heavy_Brigade

but that was our British cousins.
In 1854, my direct ancestors where 6 meager years from the War Between the States.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #70 on: 08 Nov 2014, 11:39 »

Eh sorry, brain no worry lol.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #71 on: 08 Nov 2014, 22:15 »

no prob.
don't they remove 'brain' as 'excess equipment' during Boot?


;)
thanks for your service, GM.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #72 on: 10 Nov 2014, 00:42 »

On this day, 10 November, 1775, it was resolved in the Continental Congress that two battalions of Marines be raised, Two hundred and thirty nine years later, we still stand strong.
Semper Fi.


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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #73 on: 10 Nov 2014, 11:59 »

Today is November 11, 2014

This day marks 100 years since the guns went silent on the western front and 'The War To End All Wars' came to an end.


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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #74 on: 10 Nov 2014, 12:22 »

Please excuse my previous Post.


I'm having one of those mornings



Yes, I know we're four years out from that anniversary, but that does not take away the poignancy of this day.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #76 on: 15 Dec 2014, 21:16 »

So I came to the conclusion that I did not know much about Napoleon Bonaparte. I do know some things (Waterloo, failed Russian invasion, french emperor, exiled twice, from Corsica, sold USA the Louisiana purchase, married someone named Josephine) but that's about the extent of it.  Being in the US he is mostly glossed over but I am aware that he had a phenomenal impact on Europe in his day and is probably more closely studied in Europe.  Hell I even have Napoleon Total War but hardly played it.  So over the past 4 days I watched a 4 part PBS documentary on the little corporal. Each about 45-50 minutes long.  Wow.  What an amazing and complex dude.



Still a bit puzzled on the short stereotype.  He was 5'2" tall (in french measurements, making him 5'6" tall in international measurements, or 1.68m) and the average height of Frenchmen from the time was 5'5" (international units).  The British were not much taller than that either (maybe an increase average of .02m).
« Last Edit: 15 Dec 2014, 21:32 by LeeC »
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #77 on: 16 Dec 2014, 00:50 »

Yes, Napoleon Bonaparte was above average height in his era. Part comes, I think, from ignorant confusion over the difference in units. Part from misunderstanding of his nickname "le petit caporal" as "the little corporal" where "petit" was actually meant in the same way that the word is used in "petit bourgoisie", meaning "of lesser status" rather than referring to physical size. Part possibly comes from depictions of him standing with soldiers of his Imperial Guard, who were specially selected for their unusual height and wore silly hats that made them look even taller. Part might simply have been propaganda; Adolf Hitler too was depicted as being short by hostile cartoonists etc., when he was actually about average in his time.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #79 on: 16 Dec 2014, 02:57 »

It was almost completely propaganda. I had some sources on this somewhere...
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #80 on: 17 Dec 2014, 21:14 »

two course I've registered for Spring semester:
American military History
and
survey of Korean and Vietnam Wars.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #81 on: 18 Dec 2014, 13:35 »

For obvious reasons, I have an interest in the Korean War. It does not get the attention it deserves, I think. In many ways it is more relevant to problems we face today in East Asia than the later conflict in Vietnam. I'll be interested in your comments.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #82 on: 18 Dec 2014, 14:11 »

Probably true Akima.

Korea, as a war, never gets the proper attention it deserves.

Granted, it wasn't the clusterfuck that Vietnam became, but it was still a major conflict between the east and west.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #83 on: 18 Dec 2014, 14:21 »

I remember watching a 2 or 3 hour documentary on the Korean War (Korean War: Ice and Fire or something like that) narrated by Luke Skywalker.  Was very informative.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #84 on: 18 Dec 2014, 15:11 »

Meanwhile, everyone missed the 150th anniversary of one of the last major battles of the Civil War: the Battle of Nashville.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #85 on: 19 Dec 2014, 06:46 »

And we're coming up on the 200th anniversary of the end of the war of 1812.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #86 on: 19 Dec 2014, 13:54 »

Meanwhile, everyone missed the 150th anniversary of one of the last major battles of the Civil War: the Battle of Nashville.
I am probably a bad person for imagining duelling Country & Western musicians...

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #87 on: 19 Dec 2014, 13:57 »

December 20th 1861

English transports loaded with 8,000 troops set sail for Canada so that troops are available if the "Trent Affair" is not settled without war.




For those of you unfamiliar with The Trent Affair, more info here
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GarandMarine

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #88 on: 06 Jan 2015, 01:19 »



So I've been learning more about KanColle, that weird ship girl anime I found and linked in the everything else thread, and my new favorite character Yamato, one of the smaller details in her visual design (which given all the turrets and armor is pretty fucking complex already) is a signal flag for the letter Z. This lead to some rather interesting naval history!

Starting in 1905 when Admiral Togo hoisted the Z flag aboard his flagship the IJS Mikasa (三笠) before engaging the Russian Baltic fleet to signal "The Fate of the Empire of Japan rests on this single battle, all hands shall give their all." (One of many translations) similar to Nelson's famous signal "England Expects". Following the Russo-Japanese war, the next major use of the "Z" signal is credited to Admiral Nagumo of the Dai-ichi KōKū Kantai (1st Air Fleet), who ordered the Z signal hoisted (and the same flag according to some sources) on 6 December. 1941 aboard his flagship the carrier Akagi, after he had determined his strike force had achieved complete surprise over the United States Navy. As Togo's signal was common knowledge and part of the Naval tradition/lore of the IJN by this point, the signal proved to be exactly the inspiration for his men that Nagumo desired.

The Z signal would be used several more times through out the Pacific War, and was retired after the defeat of Imperial Japan in 1945. The signal has not been readopted by the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force. The IJS Mikasa was heavily damaged, and sunk. She was recovered and restored as a floating museum before the outbreak of the Second World War, and was restored once again during the Occupation with the help of Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz. The Mikasa is the only surviving example of a pre-dreadnought battleship left anywhere in the world, and is currently moored in Yokosuka near the large joint naval base there.

天皇陛下万歳!
« Last Edit: 06 Jan 2015, 01:41 by GarandMarine »
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #89 on: 23 Jan 2015, 19:51 »

A photographer has rescued a bunch of undeveloped WWII film and has very carefully developed it so we can see what's been buried away for 70 years.

Full archive.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #90 on: 24 Jan 2015, 13:23 »


Today, 24 January, 2015, the last of the legendary Panzer Aces, a quiet man named Otto Carius passed on to legend, a reluctant draftee into the Wehrmacht, Oberleutenant Carius was never the less an effective commander and tanker and was highly decorated for his forced service to a regime he despised. Otto Carius returned home after the war to open a small apothercary, which is still in operation to this day.

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #91 on: 24 Jan 2015, 23:43 »

Kind of makes you wonder how long the WWII vets will be with us, when you consider that Florence Green, the last vet from WWI (member of the Women's Royal Air Force), died in 2012. I think we lose something like 600 per day in the US alone.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #92 on: 25 Jan 2015, 00:02 »

They won't be with us much longer. I contacted Carius's surviving family with my condolences and inquired if they still had copies of his book available. So I should be receiving a signed copy of Tigers In the Mud in a few weeks. In the original German, but I can get an English edition for my reading copy... I'd been meaning to send one to him with a request for his signature... he was quite important at my work, we had just released a new miniature specifically for him... but I obviously ran out of time.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #93 on: 15 Feb 2015, 13:20 »

Back in WWII, Joseph Medicine Crow, a member of the Crow tribe, unknowingly completed the requirements to become the last Crow War Chief while serving in Europe.
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #95 on: 19 Jun 2015, 20:42 »

That is NOT British drill, or anywhere else in the Commonwealth (or Empire as it was called back then).  And that's not the way drill commands are given in the Commonwealth. 

Drill commands are given clearly, enunciated so they can be understood.  As far as I know the US military is the only military where drill commands are given in gibberish. 
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #97 on: 22 Jun 2015, 18:32 »

today in military history, 22nd of June:

1772     A judicial ruling effectively abolishes slavery in England.
 
1807     British HMS 'Leopard' makes unprovoked attack on American USS 'Chesapeake'.

1815     Napoleon I abdicates for the second time, after Waterloo.

1876  General Alfred Terry sends Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer to the Rosebud and Little Bighorn rivers to search for Indian villages

1911     Coronation of George V as King of Great Britain

1938  American Joe Louis floors German Max Schmeling in the first round of the heavyweight bout at Yankee Stadium 

1941     Operation Barbarossa Begins: Hitler invades the Soviet Union

1945     Okinawa secured: 110,000 Japanese troops, 100,000 civilians, 17,520 US troops died

DIED:
2001     Bertie Felstead, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, last known survivor of the Christmas Truce of 1915, aged 106.   
« Last Edit: 23 Jun 2015, 17:21 by Kugai »
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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #98 on: 25 Jun 2015, 09:44 »

Extra Credits just finished a small series on the Zulu.  Worth a watch  8-)

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Re: The military history thread
« Reply #99 on: 26 Jun 2015, 04:41 »


1807     British HMS 'Leopard' makes unprovoked attack on American USS 'Chesapeake'.


Revise history much there Groggy?
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