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Author Topic: New Google Privacy-Consent-Waggamathingy - Make it StopMakeItStopMakeItStop ...  (Read 997 times)

Case

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So it's about Google's new privacy-UI-annoyance_ware-bullshit thing.

"Please tell us to back off our creepyintrusivefeelers reaching into your underwear one by one, every single time your browser connects to one of our services ...
... and did we mention that you won't have to go through our deliberately annoying consent-clicky-shitty-UI again and again if you log in with your Google account? (Don't be evil ...)"
 

Please, someone - I need it to stop! There has to be some kind of plugin or whatnot that automaticaly flips those five switches. I don't know shit about HTML, but it appears the structure of the GUI is deliberately set up in a way to make it harder to do via a plugin.

But I guess it should be possible without being logged into your Google account at all times, which is what I think they're trying to pester people (Europeans?) into by making them go through the same inane shit again and again (I'm trying minimize interaction with my Google Account, and to only access it from my mobile. I don't want it active on my Desktop machine so it can rat out on me even more. Dunno if that really makes sense, but I'm losing track of the ways the American Evil Empires have turned GDPR-compliance processes into 'Annoyance-ware' meant to getting you to sign away your privacy out of sheer exasperation)

Please, dear CS-gurus of QC - This humble student seeks guidance.

« Last Edit: 01 Nov 2020, 23:05 by Case »
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N.N. Marf

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Thanks, Nannystate!
« Reply #1 on: 02 Nov 2020, 00:18 »

I haven't consumed any Alphabet Soup since.. long enough to suspect they might have more things I'd never use anyway, but some might. My first suggestion would be to Not Use Them---fullstop. There's a highly-customizable Searx engine (pronounced ``sucks'') that anyone may host.
There's Cockmail, who specialize in crude---but they have some neutral---domains: registration requires only cookies and (for their Turing test) stylesheets, but their webmail interface requires client-side scripts---of course, they offer IMAP, POP3, SMTP interfaces, so you might point your favourite local mail-client programme at it, which is good practice anyway, to keep your mail on your machine, and delete it from the remote host as soon as possible. Some say to care much about the privacy policy of a service, but there's nothing stopping them from storing that data anyway---it just means they can't well use it contrary to their privacy policy---for now---unless they don't get caught. Cockmail doesn't ask too many questions: username, passcode, and enter some these 5-characters to pass their Turing test. Beware: they say that they won't reset your passcode if you lose it.
They have a convoluted account deletion procedure, where you have manually delete things in a certain order.. You can delete your account without that, but they don't guarantee all the data will be deleted unless you do it yourself.

Note: Gmail seem to filter out Cockmail. One workaround is to have the recipient email you first. Alphabet Soup claim incompetence about standard interoperability with smaller potential competitors elsewhere, too, but I'd have to consult my records to be exact.
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The glans, shaft, and testes had yet to be soldered together. (Probably due to Google.)
Quote from: Neil Young (Sixty to Zero, ¶5)
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cybersmurf

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Sounds like we need to compile a "I want to get away from the data rake" services list.
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N.N. Marf

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I'd say that a list of better services is not enough. Convenience/ease-of-use are important, too, so how to integrate the good services should be considered, too. Some persons say that they don't switch because it's all in one place.
The Dig Deeper article comparing email services has been recommended as a good starting point, but they seem to use bad arguments and misinterpretations to defend what they say; they seem to have good principles, and approach good conclusions, but I don't think they do it well, so I'll only recommend them as not-terrible starting point---maybe as a ranked list?
One thing to beware is services heavily advertising their privacy/security/whatever. Zoom, for example, was advertised as secure/private, but their technical documentation was difficult to find---the closest thing I found was a pamphlet that looked like an advertisement, but what little it mentioned about how they keep it secure implied they can access to users' data. What sucks is that---and this happens with plenty other `secure' services---when it's discovered they're not doing what they advertised e.g. a data leak, users don't stop using it and continue claiming it's secure/private/whatever.

Global Moderator Comment Mod edit: fixed broken link
« Last Edit: 03 Nov 2020, 13:42 by Thrillho »
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The glans, shaft, and testes had yet to be soldered together. (Probably due to Google.)
Quote from: Neil Young (Sixty to Zero, ¶5)
Now the jailhouse was empty
All the criminals were gone

Thrillho

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Yeah the first time I heard of Zoom was in the context of 'don't ever use Zoom it's unsecure as shit'.

hedgie


Supposedly, Jitsi is better. 
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pwhodges

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Many supposed insecurities are no more than inappropriate defaults that no one noticed and corrected in time.  I believe that was Zoom's problem.

Defaults are often fine, but check, check, check should be your mantra whenever using something new.  And of course you need to be confident that the person at the other end has made the same checks - which isn't so easy!
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Many supposed insecurities are no more than inappropriate defaults that no one noticed and corrected in time.  I believe that was Zoom's problem.
Way I see it, if something's advertised as secure, for non-savvy persons, it should be that, and only that. Non-savvy persons don't have the skills, but even savvy persons, have other things to do. If there's any way for it to be insecure, it should be as far outside the possible purview of the so-advertised product as possible. It certainly shouldn't be insecure by default.
Open-source is important, even for non-savvy, or busy savvy, persons, because it means anyone can audit it. Of course, if they don't have the skills to audit it well.. If it's sufficiently popular, and open-source, it's probably been audited. There's even more incentive there, if it's used for serious, e.g. scientific or commercial, purposes.
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The glans, shaft, and testes had yet to be soldered together. (Probably due to Google.)
Quote from: Neil Young (Sixty to Zero, ¶5)
Now the jailhouse was empty
All the criminals were gone

FreshScrod

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For "cloud storage" I encrypt files and upload them to different free file hosting services like anonfiles (the "[email protected]" thing is hiding "file=(atpersat)filename"). I upload them to multiple places, so that if one of them deletes it, there are other copies. I think it would be nice for a program to regularly check that the file is still up, and reupload it if it's not. For example, my computer would take a file, encrypt it, upload it to one file host, to another file host, etc. Then, it would check that the file is still there, and if it's not, then my computer can download it from one of the other places, and them upload it again.
To avoid them detecting that it's the same file being uploaded multiple times, it can be encrypted with a different key each time. Maybe it would be encrypted with a different key to different places, too, so that if they're working together, they won't notice that it's the same file being hosted in multiple places. More sophisticated features against detection could be splitting the file into multiple random-sized pieces, and piecing it back together when retrieving it.
Using different internet proxies or Tor can help against detection. Doing it at random times can help against detection.
Doing it at different times can stagger file expirations, so if all file hosts use the same expiration length, the copies won't all simultaneously expire.
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Gyrre

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Firefox
Go into the 'Privacy' section of the Settings menu for some wonderful options. And, the even have data collection and site permission options that you can toggle to 'off'.

If you think that's too good to be true, double-down with the Ghostery extension. You can customize what third party webcrawlers you block and it'll even show which ones and how many are on a page.

If you want to go even further, AdBlock Plus now has an option where you can allow ads that don't collect data so you can still give some support to websites you like. Naturally, that excludes any sights using Google AdSense.


StartPage.com is a proxy-based search engine that gives you Google results without the Google data collection. They also don't record your metadaa, either.
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The glans, shaft, and testes had yet to be soldered together. (Probably due to Google.)
Quote from: Neil Young (Sixty to Zero, ¶5)
Now the jailhouse was empty
All the criminals were gone

FreshScrod

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Summary: content recommendation services exacerbating mental health issues.
Content warning: discusses severe mental health issues, including anxiety, depression, borderline-peronality, eating-disorders, and suicide. Also, mentions political extremism. It's abit rambly/repetitive.
Video: I think YouTube is trying to make me kill myself | Algorithms and ethics (Sincere title!)
(Reminder: alternative YouTube interfaces (e.g. youtube-dl, Invidious, HookTube) and YouTube alternatives exist.)

Excerpts:
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"Anorexic people like to lose weight, so I give them weight loss communities.
I am a bot, I do not evaluate whether that is a good idea."
Quote
By telling me about depression and death all the time, it implied that those are topics worthy of my attention: things I could and should think about.
Quote
Or, to use an example more relevant to my channel: political polarization; The algorithm will in general always show you something, that is abit more of what you are watching right now.
You may start with a dispute about the scientific paper, and you will end up with flat-earthers.
You may watch a "centrist" political rant, and end up in the far right. Or hell:
You may watch a video about fallout 3, and end up on my channel!
[...]
the thing I have in common with those two, is that I sit at the end of a radicalization pipeline.
Contrast:
Quote
[Emphasizing suicide-prevention results for a suicide method query] is an example of Google being aware that sometimes the thing people need to hear and the thing people want to hear are not the same thing.

Solutions?:
I don't know that the set of solutions they present cover all possibilities. They seem to be based on the author's established opinions. The two solutions they present are similar, but I thought the latter was more interesting. The former is to make Google a worker-coöperative. The latter is to make Google a user-coöperative. One reason that I think that this is more interesting, is that the issue affects users, and a user-coöperative would give users control. Another, more general reason is that, we're all consumers! Despite this, we don't have much power over the services we recieve, other than switching to a competitor. The problem is when free competition is limited, we're stuck with what they deign to provide.
(Users of the world! Let us seize the means of consumption! I'm being abit humorous, but I would like to see more consumer-based action, to have more consumer-based control of the services we rely on.)

A non-solution:
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It's easier to tell an individual to change their mind, compared to trying to get Google to change the behaviour of their bots. But individualist solutions always have problems: some may not realize what the songs are doing to them, some may like what they hear, and some may may know it's harmful but continue to listen anyways.
I'd like to expand on this. There's abit of a false comparison in the first sentence. It may be easier to get one (1) single individual to change their mind. Is it easier to get each so-affected person to change their mind? This would depend on how many affected indidivuals there are, and, for each affected individual, how much it would take to get them to change their mind.
Of course you do whatever you can to help yourself or someone dear to you. We should always strive to find better ways of helping ourselves, our loved ones, and everyone else.


Minor note: I am mentioning this, because letting individuals have more understanding, means, and methods to have more control over their own "digital identities" is important. (As far as I can tell, this doesn't invalidate any essential point of the video.) Using a fresh user is not enough to have a fresh experience. The recommendation service might recognize a person by other data ("digital fingerprint"), maybe including similarities of username, activity, location, IP addresses, browser "user agent", history, cookies, or "supercookies", or other classes of data.
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Quote from: Daniel Cowman
I don't exist, I don't exist
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The program for this evening is not new
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