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Poll

Have you ever worked anywhere kinda like Station's description of Cubetown

No, thank god
- 15 (65.2%)
...yeah, and it was A Lot
- 8 (34.8%)

Total Members Voted: 23

Voting closed: 17 Sep 2022, 18:30


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Author Topic: WCDT - September 12th to September 16th, 2022 (strips #4871 to #4875)  (Read 2991 times)

Perfectly Reasonable

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Clinton cannot swim. If Clinton could swim, he'd be cavorting around CubeTown like a breaching dolphin.
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What would I do if I were smart?
I guess first I'd stop taking the stupid pills.

Gyrre

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Thankfully, no.
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Quote
a real-ass gaddam sword
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"Broken swords and dragon bones scattered on the way back home."

Too stubborn to die, just like the rest of my family.

shanejayell

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Poor Clinton. *lol*

St.Clair

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"oh hey, I gotta go, I... I'm on fire. Bye!"
*bip!*
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TinPenguin

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I think that's more of an urban versus not-urban thing than an America versus everybody else thing. To a large extent it depends on how built up the area around you is and how much you can afford.

You make a valid point, but in my dialect (and I think this holds true across Britain), a yard simply isn't green.

Imagine a lawn, just behind the house. Probably surrounded by a privacy fence. Certainly going to be some landscaping and trees, but not enough to really be a "garden".

This again shows the dialect disparity. A garden to me could be a landscaped park or a patch of weedy grass out front, as long as it is green. This does all come into everything just being bigger in 'Merica.

I am veering very much off-topic
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Torlek

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Imagine a lawn, just behind the house. Probably surrounded by a privacy fence. Certainly going to be some landscaping and trees, but not enough to really be a "garden".

This again shows the dialect disparity. A garden to me could be a landscaped park or a patch of weedy grass out front, as long as it is green. This does all come into everything just being bigger in 'Merica.

I am veering very much off-topic

Hence my usage of lawn. I had presumed that was the British word for an expanse of well-kept grass with few, if any, landscaping features. I presumed garden was a more formally landscaped area centered on flowering plants/bushes/etc rather than an area of grass. When Americans say yard in relation to a house (as in comparison to, say, a school yard or prison yard, which sound more in line with your expectations), we mean we took a bit of a football pitch, put it by our house and we may have some trees or flower beds in it.
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Quis pater tibi est?

Storel

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Apartment buildings tend to have the sort of backyards that TinPenguin describes, while single-family houses in the suburbs (and Northhampton definitely sounds sub-urban) tend to have green backyards.

Even in San Francisco, which is definitely a city, most houses don't have room for any front yard at all, but they'll have something green in the back.
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Wingy

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Clinton cannot swim. If Clinton could swim, he'd be cavorting around CubeTown like a breaching dolphin.
Then he fooled everyone around 2299 and 2305.

Probably hasn't thought of it yet.  Or he just got the wrong companion AI (2337).
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JimC

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I had presumed that was the British word for an expanse of well-kept grass with few, if any, landscaping features. I presumed garden was a more formally landscaped area centered on flowering plants/bushes/etc rather than an area of grass.
Tinpenguin's usage sits alongside mine (SE England). In a domestic context I would say a yard is enclosed and hard surfaced/bare earth. A garden is the totality of an area that is at least partially cultivated. A lawn is an area of grass within a garden. So a garden may consist only of a lawn, or it may be lawn plus flower beds. But just to confuse things more a vegetable garden may be an area within a garden used for growing vegetables.
« Last Edit: 18 Sep 2022, 11:59 by JimC »
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Wingy

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Hmmmm.  Then what is a "green", as in "Willesden green" from Danger Mouse.  A park (US term) with a lawn (UK term)?
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pwhodges

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A "green" would typically be a distinct grassy area neither privately owned (which would be part of a garden, or a field) nor otherwise enclosed (such as a park) - most often an area in the centre of a village with (stereotypically) the church on one side and maybe a village shop or in olden times a baker or blacksmith on another.  The green might be used for communal activities such as a fair or a cricket match (depending on size, of course).  Sometimes a village green may survive even when a village has become absorbed into a larger conurbation, or its name may survive even after the green itself has gone - which is the case at Willesden, a suburb of London which I once lived near (in that case there is a "Willesden Green" station).

In England surviving village greens have legal protection based on a defined modest amount of continuing community use, in the same way that public footpaths do.
« Last Edit: 26 Sep 2022, 15:55 by pwhodges »
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