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Author Topic: Quick Question  (Read 2738 times)

Tearon

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Quick Question
« on: 15 Apr 2005, 08:59 »

Why is it that all of the hipster snobs I know are always so happy to have records on vinyl and can't wait to tell me this?

Maybe I'm missing something, but the the only two differances I can find between that and a CD are that you can carry a CD around and that vinyl records eventualy break from extended use.

So, why on earth would somebody be so eager to let me know that they payed more money for something that won't last as long an can only be used at home?
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ucfgeek

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Quick Question
« Reply #1 on: 15 Apr 2005, 09:31 »

cause vinyl is awesome, Duh!

Some will say there is a difference to the music, but really it all comes down to style. There's something about the charm of an LP that a CD can just never have. It's like saying paperback books are just as good as 1st edition hard covers, reproductions of old comics are as good as the originals, or posters copies of paintings are better than the paintings themselves... for some people they may be, but others want to have that harder to obtain, slightly more obscure item. It all comes down to what you want the item for; it's usability, or it's collectability.
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Robbo

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Quick Question
« Reply #2 on: 15 Apr 2005, 09:34 »

I'm not an audio geek, but from what I remember reading, a lot of vinyl's actually tend to be better recordings. Because when analogue recording stuff is used, a pure analogue system doesn't have as much distortion or loss.

So you getter a better listening experiences. Someone that knows for sure want to tell me better?
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KharBevNor

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Quick Question
« Reply #3 on: 15 Apr 2005, 09:36 »

Actually, analogue stuff is lower quality, but lower quality in a different way. It sounds slightly fuzzier and also often warmer, which makes it good for low-fi genres, like indie and black metal.
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[22:25] Dovey: i don't get sigquoted much
[22:26] Dovey: like, maybe, 4 or 5 times that i know of?
[22:26] Dovey: and at least one of those was a blatant ploy at getting sigquoted

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Robbo

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Quick Question
« Reply #4 on: 15 Apr 2005, 09:39 »

Cheers for the info man.

Yep, nothing says kvlt and nerco like some fuzzy, low-fi vinyl. Well, expect some tape recorded in your basement, while you prentend it was in the middle of a forest under a full moon.
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KharBevNor

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« Reply #5 on: 15 Apr 2005, 09:44 »

A full wintermoon.

I would claim there was hellfirefog and pandaemonic blackstorms from the antarctic winterwastes involved as well. But then, I don't even have a basement to record in.
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[22:25] Dovey: i don't get sigquoted much
[22:26] Dovey: like, maybe, 4 or 5 times that i know of?
[22:26] Dovey: and at least one of those was a blatant ploy at getting sigquoted

http://panzerdivisio

muffy

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Quick Question
« Reply #6 on: 15 Apr 2005, 15:51 »

I have a theory that people brag about vinyl because it gives an impression of being 'old school', and that they've been into music for far longer than us novices, and that their opinion is therefore superior to ours...

Also, I think it has something to do with the fact that the scenesters of 40 odd years ago, would, by default, have huge record collections, and so the scenesters that followed looked up to them, and aren't confident enough to say 'ooh, I like CDs better, actually', as they're afraid of change.

By nature, scenesters aren't capable of having an independent thought, so it's understandable that they're reluctant to take  on a 'new' idea, like CDs, without first getting the approval from  their little scenester buddies. Who will be to scared to say anything. Seriously, if Darwin was studying scenesters, he'd have been amazed they weren't extinct yet.

That said, I have a slowly growing collection of records, but that's more because I can pick up albums 2nd hand for about 3 and singles for 99p, but as I listen to most of my stuff on computer, it's not ideal...
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StrikeThePostman

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Quick Question
« Reply #7 on: 15 Apr 2005, 16:23 »

The only things I have on vinyl are my parents' albums (Talking Heads, The Beatles, etc.) and Neutral Milk Hotel's "In the Aeroplane Over the Sea" because I found it for $10 and thought it was one of those things that would be nice to have in record form.

I like them mostly because they're satisfying and a nice break from MP3s.
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Kai

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« Reply #8 on: 15 Apr 2005, 17:12 »

It just feels, for some reason unknown to me, more exciting to put on a new record than a new cd. That and there's somethign about the sound, and the fact that I inherited about 300 of them. I rarely actualyl buy records that aren't at like a garage sale, unless it's somethign like the Residents, which is hard enough to find in cd form, let alone vinyl.
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but the music sucks because the keyboards don't have the cold/mechanical sound they had but a wannabe techno sound that it's pathetic for Rammstein standars.

Dent

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Quick Question
« Reply #9 on: 15 Apr 2005, 18:17 »

To misquote Annie Hall, the medium is the message.*  In other words, an article in the newspaper carries a different weight to it than if that same article were printed in a novel or pasted onto a billboard.  Each of those media have different surroundings, purposes, and cultural attachments.

The very act of sliding an LP out of an album, lifting up the turntable cover, and manually lining up the needle with the opening groove all becomes part of the music experience.  When you adjust the player, you judge with your own eye whether the platter is stable enough.  The visible path of the needle as it plays underscores the music's fluid integrity, both from song to song and artist to audience -- it's all part of the same single moment of intimacy, from start to finish.

Digital music is different in almost every manner.  Coding formats that only the player can comprehend.  Clips and samples digitally recorded, manipulated, and inserted.  Video enhancements. Repeat and shuffle.  ID3 tags scrolling underneath.  Every track individually adjustable to any equalisation setting.  PORTABLE.  It's a storm of information, a whirlwind of bits that almost electrifies the air.  Inside that storm, the listener is free to find his or her own meaning.

Note that this is all regardless of what sounds are coming out of the speakers.  The music itself is filtered through the listener's interpretation of the medium, whatever that may be.  Someone who thinks vinyl is scratchy or CDs are tinny is already predisposed to what they're going to hear.

In summary:  People who like vinyl have their own reasons to do so, but often it's because that's how they "get into the music", and we all do that in one way or another.

*Explanation of the Annie Hall joke:  In the movie, a blowhard is talking about Marshall McLuhan's theories.  When Woody can stand no more, he produces McLuhan himself out of thin air, who then proceeds to berate the loudmouth.

I'm heavily cribbing from McLuhan here, but that doesn't mean I know what I'm talking about.  Not only do I not understand a tenth of his books, I don't even own a turntable.
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