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Author Topic: A Cooking Thread?  (Read 205510 times)

abadname

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #100 on: 20 Oct 2008, 13:58 »

Hey guys, would you consider the terms "rare," "medium," and "well-done" to be descriptions of temperature? tommy just confused me in another thread.

Rareness is (lack of) doneness.  Meat that hasn't been cooked to as high a temperature will be less done, so rarer. 

However, even a rare steak needs to be done on the outside to seal the juices in, and to give a contrast in taste; and the way to get the outside done but leave the inside rare is to cook at a higher temperature for a shorter time. 

If the steak is a good bit of fillet, I like mine Bleu, please - in France I have had them query the order on the basis that (a) I couldn't possibly know what I was going to get, and (b) no Englishman could possibly want that anyway.
I had to quote this because it's a huge pet peeve of mine.  You can not, I repeat CAN NOT, seal in the juices of meat.  Searing a piece of meat is just for flavor.

I had chefs in culinary school telling us that and I would just get annoyed.  Then finally I had one chef who straightened everyone out and people were really thrown off guard.
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 14:03 by abadname »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #101 on: 20 Oct 2008, 16:01 »

Then why is it tender and juicy when you sear it? Because only the outside gets really done?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #102 on: 20 Oct 2008, 16:14 »

It kind of overpowered the breaded lemon sole I cooked tonight. How was it with the stew?

Perfect. I'll post the stew recipe after I've had a shower & breakfast.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #103 on: 20 Oct 2008, 17:02 »

My friend came by last night and brought me five tiny cabbages that her granddad grew.

I bought a quart of ham broth at the butcher on my way home from work tonight, and cut up one of the cabbages, a carrot, and two garlic cloves. I also added salt since they don't pre-salt theirs.

Honestly, it was pretty disappointing soup. It kind of smelled like sweaty ass. Cardinal Fang suggests that the taste was changed by the SPAM Lite and eggs I ate while waiting for it to cook, and while I agree that it may have tasted better if I had been hungrier, I think it was just not very good soup.

Any ideas for the other 4 tiny cabbages?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #104 on: 20 Oct 2008, 17:04 »

cole slaw. sauerkraut. cabbage rolls. corned beef and cabbage.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #105 on: 20 Oct 2008, 17:08 »

Then why is it tender and juicy when you sear it? Because only the outside gets really done?
It can do that without searing it.  But you can't sear in the juices because you can't get anything hot enough.  Searing it doesn't really affect how juicy or tender it is.  It is possible that it seems juicier due to the better flavor causing your mouth to water making the meat seem juicier?

But everything i have seen has shown that seared meat loses more weight than a cooked and unseared piece.

edit- Sorry if i sound dickish, that is not what I meant.
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 17:17 by abadname »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #106 on: 20 Oct 2008, 17:10 »

ooh, stuffed cabbage! I'll make fish and rice tomorrow, with cole slaw. Then I'll make stuffed cabbage on Wednesday night. YAY! Thanks, Phil!
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #107 on: 20 Oct 2008, 17:12 »

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #108 on: 20 Oct 2008, 17:26 »

So here's the lamb stew recipe, as promised. This is called Chakhokhbili and is originally a Georgian recipe, apparently, and I got it from the book the Food and Cooking of Russia, by Lesley Chamberlain.

- 500g (1lb) lamb, cubed
- 400g (12oz) onions
- salt
- black pepper
- 500g (1lb) tomatoes
- 1tbsp each fresh parsley, thyme, coriander and basil
- 1/2 tbsp fresh dill, mint and tarragon
- 1tsp cayenne pepper
- 1/2-1 head of garlic

Fry the meat without additional oil or fat in a heavy-bottomed pan for 10 minutes, stirring to prevent it sticking, then add the chopped onions, cook for a further 5 minutes and season lightly. Skin the tomatoes and cook until soft in a separate pan. Put the meat and tomatoes together and cook for another 15 minutes, covered. Add the fresh herbs and red pepper and cook over a gentle heat for another 5 minutes. Add the finely chopped garlic, replace the lid and allow the stew to stand for 5 minutes before serving.

Simple and delicious - especially with anchovy mash!!
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Guido Sarducci

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #109 on: 20 Oct 2008, 20:58 »

As in eating them. I admit they aren't much to look at either, but I'm not going to run screaming from the room by a big ol' pile o' an-choh-veez.

No no no. Anchovies are awesome! You've just listened to too much bad press. They add a little tang and salt to a salad, or any num,ber of otehr dishes. They suck on pizza, but there are a zillion good uses for anchovies. Almost any tomatoe sauce will be greatly improved by them. Anythign you can imagine a green olive in a n anchovie will probably work with. If you want the salt out just soak em in some cold water for a while. And if you cook them for a little while, they dissolved and you never know they were even there.

My favorite use it to soak em an to get the salt out, let em dry overnight on a napkin in a plastic baggy, and then shred them into a sald. Goood Shiiiit!
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #110 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:11 »

They suck on pizza

That's crazy-talk! For a superb pizza, just add:

- anchovies
- prosciutto (or really good quality ham if you want a less salty pizza)
- mushrooms
- pepper

Plus the tomato base and cheese on top, of course.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #111 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:13 »

All right, I'll give you the anchovies if you soak the salt out of them and crush them up a bit. But only if you'll throw some sun dried tomatoes and pesto on there as well. Then maybe we can talk. Oh, and some green olives and soem of those big fat calamatas.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #112 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:14 »

No, any more than four toppings and it's getting too complicated. Simple pizzas are the best pizzas.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #113 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:14 »

Best pizza ever = onions, and bacon or onions and pesto sauce, and maybe chicken.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #114 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:15 »

Big fat calamatas? Calamatas are the amazingly delicious kind of skinny ones. And salt is the whole POINT of anchovies.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #115 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:29 »

No, any more than four toppings and it's getting too complicated. Simple pizzas are the best pizzas.

There is one simple pizza that is allowed in the world of Guido. Pepperoni by the slice, NY style. Any other pizza should be packed with crap I like to eat and which encourages the hardening of my already stiff arteries. If, after eating a slice of really good pizza, I don't feel my head spinning from the salt sucking all of the moisture out of my blood, I do not consider it pizza.

Four toppings is like...like...like a pair of panties with nothing in them. Or one of those Victoria Secret catalogs: Nice idea but who gives a shit?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #116 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:39 »

Why ruin a pizza with a bunch of shit? Given the choice between an overloaded pizza and a cheese pizza, I'd choose cheese.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #117 on: 20 Oct 2008, 21:52 »

Big fat calamatas? Calamatas are the amazingly delicious kind of skinny ones. And salt is the whole POINT of anchovies.

No way! They're much better if you soak em for a bit to suck some of the salt out. And the little calamatas are kind of a waste. THere being a variety of sizes and even tastes, I go for the big ones that aren't very salty and still nice and plump. You can sort of squish them apart and drop them in a Salad and against the flavor of some good anchovies, some sliced red onion and crumbled feta shaken up with a bit of ceasar dressing, well, I will go far out of my way for a salad like that :-D

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Quote from: Emaline on October 20, 2008, 11:14:44 PM
Best pizza ever = onions, and bacon or onions and pesto sauce, and maybe chicken.

bleck. I can tell our minds will never meet on the subject of pizza. You might as well dumnp a gallon of barbeque sauce on it and grill it Sad

And the point pf a pizza with a bunch of shit is that it has...a bunch of shit Smiley we're not talking about high class here. We're just talking about a pile of my favorite foods jammed onto a rolled up slice of pizza dough, and baked until it's all crispy and sort of stuck together by all the grease Smiley
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 22:16 by Guido Sarducci »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #118 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:00 »

I think it's more that if you have a lot of different toppings on there then the flavours all mingle together and overpower anything. If you have a small amount of toppings on there you can have more subtle flavours on there without them being lost. At least that is what I go by when I make pizzas, I normally have chicken, sundried tomato and pineapple; maybe onion or ham (depending on what i have in the fridge). It's not the classiest pizza out there, but I prefer simple ones like that than supreme-type pizzas, where there are so many different things on there that half the stuff falls off when I try and eat it.

I give anchovies to my cat. She seems to like them more than I do.

(Oh, also double posting probably isn't a good idea, it would be better if you just edit your posts)
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 22:02 by Eris »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #119 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:01 »

so essentially guido you actually hate pizza, yourself and everybody

is that what you are trying to say
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Guido Sarducci

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #120 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:14 »

so essentially guido you actually hate pizza, yourself and everybody

is that what you are trying to say

Hmmm. I'm not sure where I said that? Did I say that? I love pizza. (make up your own mind about the rest, if you like)

Eris, I apologize for the DP's. I didn't realize I was actually doing it. Like I said earlier, for me there are two classic pizzas: everything I can shove onto one slice of very thin pizza dough, and pepperoni. Eveything else I sort of skim over when I look at a menu. I have had some great pizza in Croatia, of all places, and Italian Pizza is out of this world simply for the fresh cheese. I'd eat shoe leather over there and like it :p

I suppose I can agree with you about the foursome idea of toppings, but if I wanted a heavenly combination of minimalist ingredients I would make myself a bolonese, neh?

I guess that's kind of sad for a guy who worked as a soux in New Orleans aten't it?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #121 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:26 »

You saying you love pizza is similar to someone saying they love steak and then drowning it in A1.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #122 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:35 »

Or someone who says they love sex when really they mean they love drowning hookers.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #123 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:44 »

You're supposed to kill the hooker when you are done with them.  Every knows that.

Also, today I made some awesome roasted salsa and some guacamole.  Tomorrow I plan on making some mexican rice and some braised pork.  Add queso and put into a tortilla and game over.

Also I was thinking about my last meal on earth and it would be this dish a a local authentic mexican restaurant here that is chicken cut into small strips and cooked with chorizo then topped with queso and served with the only mexican rice i have ever liked from a restaurant.  they bring you a few hot tortillas to eat with them.  Seriously, it is amazing.
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Guido Sarducci

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #124 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:47 »

You saying you love pizza is similar to someone saying they love steak and then drowning it in A1.
Not a bit. I have said that there are two ways I love pizza: Peperoni, or gobs of stuff rolled up and dripping all over my shirt.  I enjoy both equally, but only eat my deathza once in a while...because I might as well be eating a can of lard. That YOU don't like it doens't mean it isn't a perfectly valid way to kill oneself. :|

As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.


Dovey, you keep making these generally agressive, sweeping insults in a tone that suggests you'd caught me bouncing you mother off the headboard...I can only assume you've decided you're in love with me and want to impress me.   :laugh:

I don't drown my hookers. I stuff them with a mix of sausage and onions, and grill them. Why waste good meat?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #125 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:50 »

I like a true italian pizza as much as i like the bastardized american version.  But i think more than a few toppings and you are just raping your pizza.

I'm not sure, it tastes less musty so i am assuming there is little to no cumin in there, then it's not the yellow you normally see so they probably leave off turmeric.  I can't figure out what they do to make it so good, and I have seriously studied it trying to figure out.  My restaurant spanish isn't good enough to ask them either.
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 22:53 by abadname »
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Guido Sarducci

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #126 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:51 »


the only mexican rice i have ever liked from a restaurant
I am in the same boat--restaraunt mexican rice is nasty. What do they do differently?
I am in Mississippi of all places and had a bowl of mexican chicken soup here that made me want to marry the cook. She had a mustache and at least ten kidsso it was a no go, but daaaamn!
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 22:53 by Guido Sarducci »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #127 on: 20 Oct 2008, 22:59 »

As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.

I don't know what kind of butter you use.  But it shouldn't caramelize seeing as butter typically contains no sugars.

Speaking of butter, what is a good compound butter that I could serve on top of steak?  My roommate's dad owns a butcher shop so he can get some nice porterhouses pretty cheaply.  I was thinking about cooking some of there Bistecca alla Fiorentina style (High heat, the only preparation for the meat would be drizzling it with olive oil, salt and pepper).  I was thinking about a compound butter flavored with sea salt, pepper, garlic paste, and rosemary.  My mom suggested adding a dash of red wine in with it as well.  What would be a good wine to add to the butter, and ultimately drink with dinner?  I am not so educated in the wine and food pairing department.

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.
« Last Edit: 20 Oct 2008, 23:25 by -Karamazov- »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #128 on: 21 Oct 2008, 02:39 »

Dovey, you keep making these generally agressive, sweeping insults in a tone that suggests you'd caught me bouncing you mother off the headboard...I can only assume you've decided you're in love with me and want to impress me.

I choose to be personally offended by people who have horrible taste in pizza. It's my "thing"

Usually it's people who insist on putting pineapple on, so I'm always happy when I get a curveball.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #129 on: 21 Oct 2008, 06:15 »

In regards to steak rarity: 125F is Rare, 135 is Medium Rare, 145 Medium, 155 Medium Well, and 160+ is Well.  No one wants to eat a piece of meat with holesin it, so most chefs do not use a meat thermometer. It is possible to get a fairly accurate temperature by feeling the firmness of the meat.

Hold your hand open and relaxed, palm upwards. Lightly touch the tip ofyour index finger and the tip of your thumb together. Now, feel the mound at the base of your thumb. That is what a rare steak should feel like. To get differing degrees of doneness, simply progress one finger over for each degree.  For well done, apply some pressure with your pinky and thumb, to tighten the mound.

I also agree with abadname regarding "sealing in juices."  The purpose of searing a piece of meat is to caramelize the sugars present in it, making it more visually appealing, offering a contrasting texture to the preferably rare center, and enhancing the flavor.

As far as a good compound butter, you could try Buerre Poivre.  Over high heat, reduce 8oz full-bodied red wine, with 1 clove garlic,  2 shallots, and  3-4oz  cracked black peppercorns.  When about 1oz of wine is left, remove from heat, strain thewine reduction out, and fold it into 8oz softened butter.  If you happen to have any veal stock, I would advocate adding 8oz stock, reducing by half, and then adding 2oz of raw butter off of heat in lieu of folding the wine into the butter, but Veal bones are surprisingly hardto come by, at least here in Atlanta.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #130 on: 21 Oct 2008, 06:24 »

Usually it's people who insist on putting pineapple on, so I'm always happy when I get a curveball.

One of my favorite "pizzas" has pineapple on it! Sweet bbq sauce (either brown sugar or honey based) instead of your standard tomato based pizza sauce, bacon, onions and pineapple. All relatively strong flavors, but none cancel each other out. I used to not like bacon and onions together on pizza but now I find it to be one of my favorite combinations.

Also, pepperoni isn't complete without black olives and mushrooms, and another good trio is goat cheese, sundried tomatoes and spicy italian sausage. I'm also of the opinion that you shouldn't stack too many toppings on a single pizza, go with three or four choices that go well together, cut out the other unnecessary stuff. Though I will go for a meat lover's monstrocity or veggie supreme every now and then.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #131 on: 21 Oct 2008, 06:27 »

Foodstuffs that can go fuck themselves - olives and sun-dried tomatoes. All of the other foods are tasty. All of them.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #132 on: 21 Oct 2008, 08:37 »


10 minutes later


Successful cooking!

But, uhm, the real reason I'm posting: What are your favourite and/or easiest things to pack for lunch? I'm trying to eat more regularly, but it's difficult when at school due to 10-15 minute breaks and stuff, so there's no time to go buy food (plus I am dirt poor). Crispy bread with stuff on it is good for breakfast, but they get soggy and gross after a few hours, and regular bread with topping (aka "open faced sandwiches", apparently) always gets a little bit dry, and are always sort of a let-down.. Salads are great, but they take too long to make :/ Suggestions, anyone?

Also, recipe suggestion that is made from pure win: Chicken fillet and garlic flavoured cream cheese cooked in aluminium foil, seasoned with oregano and a couple of other things. So good, and super easy to make!
« Last Edit: 21 Oct 2008, 09:06 by Ladybug »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #133 on: 21 Oct 2008, 09:28 »

Foodstuffs that can go fuck themselves - olives and sun-dried tomatoes. All of the other foods are tasty. All of them.

Okay, I agree that sun dried tomatoes aren't good in all contexts, but they're not bad for some things. And olives are delicious! how dare ye!
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #134 on: 21 Oct 2008, 11:06 »

As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.

I don't know what kind of butter you use.  But it shouldn't caramelize seeing as butter typically contains no sugars.

Speaking of butter, what is a good compound butter that I could serve on top of steak?  My roommate's dad owns a butcher shop so he can get some nice porterhouses pretty cheaply.  I was thinking about cooking some of there Bistecca alla Fiorentina style (High heat, the only preparation for the meat would be drizzling it with olive oil, salt and pepper).  I was thinking about a compound butter flavored with sea salt, pepper, garlic paste, and rosemary.  My mom suggested adding a dash of red wine in with it as well.  What would be a good wine to add to the butter, and ultimately drink with dinner?  I am not so educated in the wine and food pairing department.

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.

I'm not sure where you learned to cook but I grew up in New Orleans. I worked at Commander's Palace and Antione's as a kid. When one uses the term caramelize in cooking (there anyway) it is generally intended to mean more than sugar caramel. When fat burns or frizzles, it is described as caramelized. Butter that has turned brown is described as caramelized. I'm sure you know what you are talking about, but when Paul Prudhomme and Ruy Guste teach me to use a term, I'll stick with it over some guy on the internet, neh?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #135 on: 21 Oct 2008, 11:09 »

When sundried tomatoes are utilized correctly they are a little piece of heaven.

edit- And the term carmelized just means the color of the product, bread, meat, and butter are called caramelized when they are really just the effects of maillard reactions.  And guido, i know that you probably know a lot about cooking and you worked with some chefs who are good at what they do, but you get an elitist attitude sometimes man.

Also interesting fact, tabasco sauce has more acetic acid than white vinegar.  Vinegar is nearly pure acetic acid too.
« Last Edit: 21 Oct 2008, 11:15 by abadname »
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Peet

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #136 on: 21 Oct 2008, 11:19 »

I made my first butter sauce tonight, to have over salmon and couscous and garlic mushrooms. It is a pretty great thing. The idea seems to be "butter is pretty tasty huh" "yes why not melt it and dribble it on things".
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #137 on: 21 Oct 2008, 12:18 »

When sundried tomatoes are utilized correctly they are a little piece of heaven.

edit- And the term carmelized just means the color of the product, bread, meat, and butter are called caramelized when they are really just the effects of maillard reactions.  And guido, i know that you probably know a lot about cooking and you worked with some chefs who are good at what they do, but you get an elitist attitude sometimes man.

Also interesting fact, tabasco sauce has more acetic acid than white vinegar.  Vinegar is nearly pure acetic acid too.

Actually I don't know a lot about cooking any more. It's been twenty + years since I did it for a liiving. It's not eletist Abad, it's just permenantly grumpy  :-o Although admitedly the two can be hard to tell apart :) I'm a lot older than most of the posters in here , I think, and I get irritated when someone tries to correct me when I've been doing it for thirty years. I was a soldier for twenty years, and when someone tries to explain to me how to judge wind spead and distance I can't help but want to flick their ear,. Sorry I'm a dick, guys, I try... I'll try harder from now on.

Mexican rice--I never boterhed to learn anything about it because I always thought it was kind of gross. So I looked up recipes. This one seems about the sanest and doesn't make it all restaraunt nasty imo.

Quote
Mexican Rice 1 teaspoon olive oil
1 cup chopped onion
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup uncooked long grain rice 1 cup water
10 ounces diced tomatoes and green chilies -- (1 can) undrained
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic; sauté 4 minutes. Add rice, water, and tomatoes; bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until the liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat; stir in cilantro. Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1 cup).


It reminds me more of the dirty rice I grew up with. speaking of which:
Quote
DIRTY RICE   

2 tbsp. bacon drippings
1/2 lb. lean ground beef
1/2 lb. lean ground pork
1 c. chopped onion
1/4 c. chopped fresh parsley
1/4 c. chopped green onions
1/2 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup bell pepper finely chopped
1 lb. chicken giblets, boiled & chopped
4 c. giblet stock
1 tbsp. minced garlic
8 c. cooked rice
2 tbsp. Worcestershire sauce
Salt to taste
Louisiana hot sauce to taste

In a large deep saucepan over medium heat, saute the ground beef and pork in the bacon drippings until crumbly. Add the bell pepper, onions, celery, parsley and green onion. Cook until onion are clear. Stir in the chopped giblets, stock, garlic, rice, and Worcestershire sauce. Add salt and hot sauce. Then mix together well everything.
Cook, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook 1 hour. Leftover Dirty Rice can be eaten with eggs for breakfast.

Makes 10 servings or enough to stuff 1 large hen or 8 to 10 bell peppers.

I stole this off the net because I'm lazy but it's a pretty generic recipe. Wonder if I should start an actual recipe thread...
 
I know tons of old cajun stuff...
« Last Edit: 21 Oct 2008, 12:35 by Guido Sarducci »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #138 on: 21 Oct 2008, 13:00 »

You can also add spices like cumin and chili powder into the rice, at least that what our family has always done. Also instead of a can of diced green chilies and tomatoes we usually go for stewed tomatoes and a chipotle pepper.

And post your recipes on this thread! That way its a thread about recipes and cooking stories and cooking advice and tips, though I guess we could cut out some of the nonconstructive criticism of certain ingredients a little...
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #139 on: 21 Oct 2008, 13:31 »

If you have a problem with tiny little fish, I suggest you watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxB5XuuNy1I

And, that lamb stew looks awesome. Never really at lamb outside of gyros growing up >.>
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #140 on: 21 Oct 2008, 13:32 »

Technically caramelization is for sugar only. I personally would not use the term for anything that didn't involve browning sugar, but as always, words take on new meanings and language is fluid and I'm not going to argue someone's interpretation of language in a specific field.

-pizza
-question

That is a great looking pizza!

For lunches I usually just cook a double-dose of dinner the night before and pack half of it. Usually depends on you having a microwave handy, though.
« Last Edit: 21 Oct 2008, 13:36 by Slick »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #141 on: 21 Oct 2008, 13:47 »

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.

Topical examination of internet recipes say it's a go. This looks pretty tasty.
I would assume, though, that you don't want to add the wine hot, so as to avoid actually melting the butter, I think you just want to process it?

EDIT: By it's a go I mean it's a go to reduce the wine before hand.
« Last Edit: 21 Oct 2008, 14:37 by Slick »
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #142 on: 21 Oct 2008, 14:12 »

That is a great looking pizza!

For lunches I usually just cook a double-dose of dinner the night before and pack half of it. Usually depends on you having a microwave handy, though.
It is an awesome pizza! It's so good, it took several months before I even gave any thought to the fact that there is no meat on it, which used to be a prerequisite for a pizza to be any good in my opinion.

Also, I do the dinner thing sometimes, when the dinner tastes acceptable cold. But now that you mention it, there is a microwave available a couple of places at school near where I am at lunch time a few days a week, and I always have leftovers in the refrigerator, because cooking for one is a bitch, so it's actually a great idea for food that requires heat as well. Thanks!
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #143 on: 21 Oct 2008, 14:28 »

As for Steak the only way I'll eat a steak is if it's an honest medium rare, preprared with a dab of butter for caramelization, sea salt, and rfesh ground black pepper. Anything else is a waste of cow.

I don't know what kind of butter you use.  But it shouldn't caramelize seeing as butter typically contains no sugars.

Speaking of butter, what is a good compound butter that I could serve on top of steak?  My roommate's dad owns a butcher shop so he can get some nice porterhouses pretty cheaply.  I was thinking about cooking some of there Bistecca alla Fiorentina style (High heat, the only preparation for the meat would be drizzling it with olive oil, salt and pepper).  I was thinking about a compound butter flavored with sea salt, pepper, garlic paste, and rosemary.  My mom suggested adding a dash of red wine in with it as well.  What would be a good wine to add to the butter, and ultimately drink with dinner?  I am not so educated in the wine and food pairing department.

Also, when adding wine to a compound butter, should I reduce the wine in a pan first or would it be better to create the emulsion with fresh wine?  I would assume that reducing it would intensify the flavor, thus making allowing you to add less wine and create a more solid emulsion.  But I am also not sure of the effect that the alcohol would have on the butter itself and whether or not I would want to remove it.
I haven't used any butter compound on steak, but I usually just use the unsalted butter (soft obviously). To my understanding, it doesn't make a huge difference.

And, yeah, you want to reduce the sauce + whatever other shallots/etc. Cool it on top of an ice bowl and mix until it is cold when you touch it. Remove from ice and mix with butter, salt, pepper, etc.

As far as wine goes, something red.

EDIT: I guess Rachel Ray (heh) says you can just cook the butter in the pan and throw it in the fridge. ( http://www.rachaelraymag.com/recipes/beef-pork-lamb-recipes/panfried-steak-with-red-wine-butter/article.html ). Your call.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #144 on: 21 Oct 2008, 15:10 »

She adds some to cook the shallots then adds more once the mixture has cooled to make it a compound butter.  It's a little different.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #145 on: 21 Oct 2008, 19:55 »

Rachel Ray also says you can 8-piece a raw chicken on a cutting board, flip the board over to cut potatoes,and no harm done.

She also says EVOO.

I'm not sure which i worse.

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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #146 on: 21 Oct 2008, 20:00 »

I thought you were OK to use the same cutting board if the stuff is going in the same place. Like if you're cutting meat and veggies on the same board, its ok if they're going into the same stir fry?
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #147 on: 21 Oct 2008, 20:06 »

I always heard that you can cut up veggies first and then meat on the same board, but the other way around is not good.

Although I don't know why that would be...wouldn't cooking kill the salmonella or trichinosis or whatever it is you're worried about, in theory?

Paging Yelley to this thread with her mad food microbiologist skillz.
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #148 on: 21 Oct 2008, 20:13 »

Depends on how you're cooking it, like how hot, how long for, etc.

(also you can get gastroenteritis from vegetables as well because they use copious amounts of manure as fertiliser)
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Re: A Cooking Thread?
« Reply #149 on: 21 Oct 2008, 20:24 »

It depends.  To reliably kill salmonella, you need to hit 165F for 15 seconds.  If you were simply trimming the ends off some green beans before blanching, they could potentially be contaminated, and wouldn't reach the 165F mark.  Would they be safe to eat?

Probably

As someone who has had salmonella before, probably is not good enough for me.  Salmonella is a shitty disease.

The basic heirarchy is Ready to eat food > raw vegetables > whole muscle or steak beef > pork and ground beef > fish > poultry.

Something higher on the list won't contaminate something lower on the list.
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