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Author Topic: Where to start?  (Read 69942 times)

Koremora

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Where to start?
« on: 12 Jan 2010, 19:31 »

It seems a common problem for people wanting to get into a new band/musician/composer with a large back catalogue and many reisssues: where does one start? I figured it would be good to have a thread where people can ask this question. I'll start.

I've been meaning to get into Steve Reich for a long time, but the massive body of work the man has coupled with the multiple reissues has left me a bit lost. I've heard that Music for 18 Musicians is the best starting point, but what recording is the "best"? Is the Phases box set worth it?
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Zingoleb

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #1 on: 12 Jan 2010, 19:47 »

Also, is someone's "best" work the best to listen to first? Then it sort of seems like such a disappointment to their other ones thereafter.
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scarred

Re: Where to start?
« Reply #2 on: 12 Jan 2010, 20:18 »

if you were a real music nerd you'd go chronologically
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #3 on: 12 Jan 2010, 20:21 »

Sometimes that seems like a good idea, except it encourages a really bad habit I have of getting an artist's first two albums and liking them a lot and never moving beyond them. And on the other hand, some bands with shitty first albums get way better.

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #4 on: 12 Jan 2010, 21:17 »

music for 18 is what you should spin first. after that listen to different trains, its a string quartet with a pretty badass use of vocal samples.

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Koremora

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #5 on: 12 Jan 2010, 21:27 »

Okay, but which recording? EMC or Nonesuch?
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Zingoleb

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #6 on: 13 Jan 2010, 07:59 »

if you were a real music nerd you'd go chronologically

If I started listening to Pink Floyd with Syd I'd probably never get into them, period. Seriously, fuck Piper at the Gates of Dawn.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #7 on: 13 Jan 2010, 11:53 »

Where to start query two: Where do I start if I wanna listen to this The Fall all the kids these days are going on about?
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #8 on: 13 Jan 2010, 11:56 »

Where should I start with The Wire?
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #9 on: 13 Jan 2010, 12:22 »

Okay, but which recording? EMC or Nonesuch?

im pretty sure my copies are nonesuch at least for different trains. i couldn't tell you what my recording of music for 18 musicians is though. it doesn't matter that much though im sure one is better.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #10 on: 13 Jan 2010, 12:22 »

Where to start query two: Where do I start if I wanna listen to this The Fall all the kids these days are going on about?

I am no expert on the Fall, but I think the two albums most commonly cited as major touchstones are Hex Enduction Hour (1982) and This Nation's Saving Grace (1985). Personally, I think the Fall is a band best discovered chronologically. I started by listening to Live at the Witch Trials and Dragnet, which were both released in 1979. Dragnet is one of my personal favourites. Basically everything from 1979-1986 is unfuckwithable, after that I am a bit hazy. If you want to check out what they are up to these days, their most recent album Imperial Wax Solvent is pretty solid.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #11 on: 13 Jan 2010, 13:42 »

The Fall are one of my favourite bands but they require an unusual amount of patience to fully appreciate. On the one hand, they are a rewarding project for a music hobbyist in need of a serious discography but on the other, to the average music listener I fully understand how even the best of their songs seem hilariously esoteric. However, they certainly offer an utterly unique listening experience and I'd urge anyone with the patience to at attempt the 70s output, which is indisputably the band's zenith as a creative unit. Personally I'd stick with studio albums with one exception - the incredible Peel Session box-set which is also a surprisingly good introduction to the band.

In terms of studio albums I would definitely go chronologically. Live at The Witch Trials is quite overproduced but has some great songs. If you get the expanded edition it should come with a lot of their early singles, most of which were terrific. However, immediately after that album the band changed personnel and the gregarious Mark E Smith took over as de facto band leader. As a result, the band stripped down their sound on the reductionist but incredible Dragnet, which may well be my favourite. For the next few years the line-up was pretty stable and the sound developed into what MES called 'Country and Northern'. For the rest of the 70s into the early 80s, a series of brilliant albums followed one after the other. In particular the career highlight Grotesque (After the Gramme) (a speed induced rockabilly reappraisal of life in England), the brief but beatific Slates (shows the band in disarray but at their caustic best) and the hulking Hex Enduction Hour (recorded partly in Iceland and intended to be a band the band's bitter swansong, alternately crushing and evocative). As far as I'm concerned that's really the meat of the early discography. This era of the band also produced the best singles, specifically 'Rowche Rumble', 'Fiery Jack', 'How I Wrote Elastic Man', 'Totally Wired' and 'I'm into CB'. Fortunately the reissues collect most of these but they are an absolute must regardless.

Into the 80s the band became both more accessible and artistic at once with the arrival of American guitar-slinger Brix Smith, then wife of MES. The Velvet Underground-esque droning of the intimidatingly dense Perverted By Language has become a fan favourite over time but requires enormous persistence. More approachable is the one-two punch of The Wonderful & Frightening World of The Fall and This Nation's Saving Grace, both of which ushered in a new era for The Fall. The former is characterised by Brix Smith's memorable new wave inspired riffs over a thundering rhythm section which sounds more like hammers falling on anvils than any conventional band. The latter is even more bombastic but is somewhat tempered by a comparatively glossy production sound, which might explain why it is often heralded as the band's creative peak (whereas in actuality it was the commercial peak). The remaining three albums of the decade are less approachable and show signs of the impending decline which would occur over the next few line-ups of the The Fall. The album I Am Kurious Oranj is actually the soundtrack to a ballet the band participated in but contains the significant 'New Big Prinz', a thumping anthem which still on occasion finds its way into live sets (MES being notoriously reluctant to play anything older than two records or so to this day).

The 90s is essentially The Fall's lost decade, characterised by constant line-up changes, massive substance abuse and some highly debatable artistic decisions from the seemingly madcap MES. The run of records from Extricate to The Infotainment Scan is surprisingly solid, if somewhat repetitive. Although superior to the late 80s output, even the most die-hard Fall fan (and believe me there are many) would be hard pressed to distinguish each record from the previous one. However, the run of records from Middle Class Revolt to Levitate is patchy, occasionally incomprehensible. Personally I would skip to The Marshall Suite, which at least showed some signs of a credible recovery. Much better is the frankly brilliant The Unutterable, which evokes the best of the punk era welded to a new-found respect for electronica and computer manipulation. Given the fact that borderline everybody had written the band off as a train-wreck during the 90s, the turn of the millennia has surprisingly yielded a run of form which actually gives the classic 70s era a run for its money. The Real New Fall LP finds just the right blend of sonic experimentation and feisty garage rock resulting in another latter-day classic. Fall Heads Roll and Reformation Post-TLC both hone the garage rock to a single furious core but the sense of experimentation returns with the inspired Imperial Wax Solvent. Discarding the rather pointless Are You Are Missing Winner, the run of form since The Unutterable has been brilliant and looks set to continue with a new record later this year.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #12 on: 13 Jan 2010, 14:02 »

Unlike the Machine, Tommy IS a Fall expert. He knows his shit.

My small contribution, as far as the Fall goes, is that I actually fell in love with the band after I heard their two tracks on Short Circuit: Live at the Electric Circus. Seriously, "Stepping Out" and "Last Orders" are fucking ace and made me want to grab more by The Fall immediately.

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #13 on: 13 Jan 2010, 14:11 »

Unlike the Machine, Tommy IS a Fall expert. He knows his shit.

So does Machine, he picked out the best records to begin with in far fewer words.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #14 on: 13 Jan 2010, 14:14 »

i can say this about The Fall:

if you ever decide to listen to all of John Peel's Festive 50 countdowns, and you thought you were a Fall fan, prepare to get utterly fucking sick of them very quickly.

i would recommend one of their most underrated/forgotten 90s albums, "i am kurious oranj", for their later stuff.  otherwise stick to their 80s albums, unless you really want to hear a lot of forgettable aimless/tuneless songs with mark e. smith vaguely rambling over them as if he couldn't be bothered to actually "sing" in any kind of relation to the music.
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tommydski

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #15 on: 14 Jan 2010, 01:19 »

Thanks for posting.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #16 on: 14 Jan 2010, 01:53 »

i would recommend one of their most underrated/forgotten 90s albums, "i am kurious oranj", for their later stuff.

That's actually from '88. And it's not that forgotten for a Fall album, even inspiring and providing the theme for The Curious Orange on Lee and Herring's short lived but fondly remembered This Morning With Richard Not Judy (Stewart Lee is an enormous Fall fan).
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #17 on: 14 Jan 2010, 02:02 »

Seriously, fuck Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #18 on: 14 Jan 2010, 02:27 »

Piper at the Gates is cool and all but it's certainly not the first Floyd record you should hear (or second, third, fourth, etc)
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tommydski

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #19 on: 14 Jan 2010, 03:52 »

I'd argue that it's better to start there since it'd be harder to go back once you are thoroughly familiar with the prog era.

Most bands progress, if the first record is well rated I'd always start there.
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Zingoleb

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #20 on: 14 Jan 2010, 09:17 »

Astronomy Domine is the only good song on there. Bike is  funny and enjoyable because it's horribly goofy.

I used to be obsessed with Floyd, but by the time I was starting to get into the Syd-era my interest was waning.
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scarred

Re: Where to start?
« Reply #21 on: 14 Jan 2010, 15:30 »

If I started listening to Pink Floyd with Syd I'd probably never get into them, period. Seriously, fuck Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

"Interstellar Overdrive" is so fucking good what are you talking about
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #22 on: 14 Jan 2010, 15:39 »

That's actually from '88. And it's not that forgotten for a Fall album, even inspiring and providing the theme for The Curious Orange on Lee and Herring's short lived but fondly remembered This Morning With Richard Not Judy (Stewart Lee is an enormous Fall fan).

ah, for some reason i could have sworn it was from '92 or so.  and i say "forgotten" because i've never really seen anyone talk much about it.
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Zingoleb

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #23 on: 14 Jan 2010, 16:03 »

If I started listening to Pink Floyd with Syd I'd probably never get into them, period. Seriously, fuck Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

"Interstellar Overdrive" is so fucking good what are you talking about

What are you talking about? (I have no idea which song that was, I listened through to the album twice and only picked up the names of the two I enjoyed)
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #24 on: 14 Jan 2010, 20:35 »

I don't think you can "get into" music. You may want to listen to a band and see if you like them. You can't mean to like them. You will or you won't. You can't force it.

That being said, follow the suggestions of others that have posted here...but don't make yourself like a band just because you want to get into them because they are critically acclaimed and respected.
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tommydski

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #25 on: 15 Jan 2010, 01:49 »

I don't think you can "get into" music. You may want to listen to a band and see if you like them. You can't mean to like them. You will or you won't. You can't force it.

This pretty much undermines my entire belief about music and is probably where the line between music hobbyist and casual listener is drawn. No camp is better than the other and I understand both but obviously I tend to personally relate better to the former than the latter. I find people who are engaged in music to be near enough without exception interesting people and in some cases this might be why I feel an unusual kinship with the hundred or so folks who have come to inhabit this community. I can be friends with casual listeners but overwhelmingly I find those who I form a lasting bond with are music hobbyists. It's a matter of personal preference obviously.

In extremely simplistic terms the cliché that life is a catharsis runs true for me and specifically for my appreciation and enjoyment of near enough everything and anything. Sometimes you have to endure or tolerate something for a period of time before you can even start to enjoy it. Sometimes I have to watch a film a few times before I understand it. When I first started drinking coffee, I did so with milk and sugar. The first few times I drank it without milk made it seem harsh and bitter. After three or four cups I was completely used to it and eventually discarded the sugar too. Once I had, I began to taste all the wondrous aspects of good coffee which were previously obscured. Now I can't drink it with milk and sugar, it tastes overly-sweet and texturally compromised. If I hadn't endured the immediate shock of black coffee for a period of time, I'd never know how rewarding it could be. Likewise with whisky, which as a teenager I never would have believed that it was possible to enjoy neat.

I find it's sometimes the same with music. I didn't like most of my favourite bands upon hearing them and usually I take it as a good sign when something immediately confuses or annoys me in the right way. Repeated listens often reveal hidden depth and the appeal becomes gradually apparent. Sometimes the most-evocative art is somewhat esoteric or obfuscated by design and requires some patience and tolerance to understand. Think of it as the difference between instant gratification and gradual overwhelming fulfilment. A candy cane now or waiting for a proper cooked meal. An easy one night stand or a prolonged romance. Like basically everything else in life, the more you put into listening to music, the more you can get out of it.

It's not true of all bands but that's why we have these discussions. You get a feeling from other people what you will or will not like based on experience and estimation. Other people who do love something can sometimes help isolate the appeal of an artist, which may gradually become more apparent to you with time.
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BeoPuppy

Re: Where to start?
« Reply #26 on: 15 Jan 2010, 01:53 »

Based on your posts so far ... are you just an excellent typer blind, fast and/or otherwise?
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tommydski

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #27 on: 15 Jan 2010, 02:19 »

Sorry, was that directed at me? I don't really understand.
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BeoPuppy

Re: Where to start?
« Reply #28 on: 15 Jan 2010, 02:36 »

Huge walls of texts seemingly typed extremely fast. Just wondering.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #29 on: 15 Jan 2010, 02:37 »

If I were to guess (and I would) in all likelihood the hows and whys of music fandom are things that Tommy thinks about hard and often. Enthusiasts are good for nothing if not generating a lot of analysis quickly. Given the chance I could hammer out a page of stream-of-consciousness ramblings about RPG game design in a flat minute, since it's something that I immerse myself in on more or less a daily basis. Every nerd's got a thing.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #30 on: 15 Jan 2010, 02:45 »

Huge walls of texts seemingly typed extremely fast. Just wondering.

Not that fast sadly. I still type with just my index fingers, never did learn beyond that.

It is pretty amazing how I can make such long posts which say little or nothing, call it a gift.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #31 on: 15 Jan 2010, 18:59 »

fff whatever dude you basically just articulated my aesthetic in a way I never could, you jerk
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #32 on: 16 Jan 2010, 17:35 »

Kenickie this, Kenickie that

Your post, despite being a highly intriguing read, did not dispute my original statement. You cannot choose to "get into" a band/artist prior to hearing them. You may not have liked this Kenickie band at first, probably because you didn't want to like it (the exact opposite of trying to get into a band). While it's all well and good that you like Kenickie despite your feelings towards the sub-genre of music it is supposedly classified as, in no way does your tale run contrary to my statement that you cannot just decide to "get into" a band. If someone says this, it means that they have probably heard from music critics or music geeks or someone they admire or wherever that the music is "good". However, what music is "good" is entirely subjective based on one's own opinions. This is why when you question different demographics, there is a good chance all of them will have a different favourite band. You cannot decide you like something before you hear it, unless you entirely irrational and would rather let other people tell you music is good or bad instead of deciding on your own.

"Casual listeners" vs. "Music Hobbyists", Coffee, Instant gratification, something something something

I am not sure where to even start with your post. First, I have to wonder if you even like yourself or if you have merely worked hard to construct your likes to appear "sophisticated", "eccentric", or "cool". I wonder where you draw the line between alleged music hobbyists and casual listeners. Are casual listeners people who listen to Top 40 radio or a band that is hugely popular, like the Dave Matthews Band? What makes you so much better than a person who likes music that is popular amongst others? People like what they like; it does not make them bad people. It seems you have a spent a lot of time listening to music; good for you. People who may not listen to these bands likely have other interests, such as athletics, or automobiles, or fashion, etc.; they would likely find YOU and your music obsession uninteresting. It works both ways. Just because someone don't like obscure music does not make them any less interesting, or any more interesting.

I also don't see how you think you are better at listening to music than the "casual listener" because you have to listen to albums and bands you hate at first multiple times before you like them. Repetition breeds content. The more you listen to crap, the more you will like it (not to necessarily say that you listen to crap, but who knows). This is evident with many of the songs on the Top 40 radio station. Many are not good, yet if you hear them every hour, eventually you may find them sticking in your head (at least until the next "new" sound comes around).


In Conclusion:
I think you and Jeans misconstrued my original post - I was merely saying that you can't decide prior to hearing something that you are going to like it, just because it is said to be good. Sure, with bands that have massive catalogs, it is often helpful to find a good place to start your listening. BUT you should go in with an open mind. "I am interested in hearing what such-and-such sounds like. What is a good place to start?" is a much better question than "I've been meaning to get into...".
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scarred

Re: Where to start?
« Reply #33 on: 16 Jan 2010, 23:33 »

What are you talking about? (I have no idea which song that was, I listened through to the album twice and only picked up the names of the two I enjoyed)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2wud_RqEaM
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #34 on: 17 Jan 2010, 02:12 »

Kieron Gillen/Jamie Mackelvie's Phonogram

I'm sorry but I have to point this out. Gillen and Mackelvie's Phonogram 2: The Singles Club is one of the best graphic novels/limited series you will probably ever read if not, then certainly the best of last year. The last issue is sure to come out this month so the trade, through Image, is just around the corner. A quick google will tell you all you need.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #35 on: 17 Jan 2010, 06:20 »

Okay, but which recording? EMC or Nonesuch?

I'd say ECM, and also second listening to Different Trains next.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #36 on: 17 Jan 2010, 07:13 »

You cannot choose to "get into" a band/artist prior to hearing them...If someone says this, it means that they have probably heard from music critics or music geeks or someone they admire or wherever that the music is "good". However, what music is "good" is entirely subjective based on one's own opinions.

Why isn't it a good idea to try listening to something that has been recommended to you by a source you are favorably inclined towards? It may still end up being something you like. Yes, it's probably not good for you if you just force yourself to listen to things because you think it will make you cool, but it's reasonable to try something from, say, a person who you've already found to have tastes overlapping with yours.

Also, there's the fact that it's nice to share experiences. Thus, I think it makes sense to 'try' to like something that your friends like.

Anyways, I'm not sure if others will agree, but for me personally, sometimes I like to listen to music solely because I know there is someone I like/respect who listens to it; in other words, the reason why I like it is the associative value. This only comes into play in certain situations, but I thought it was worth pointing out that circumstances can cause you to like music the same way it can cause you to like anything else. For example the music my brother listens to is really dumb and terrible but sometimes I actually want to hear it now that he lives in another city.

Finally, I think when people in this thread have been saying they "mean to get into" a group/artist, they are not implying that liking the music is a foregone conclusion. Sometimes it just doesn't stick, and I imagine people accept that.

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I am not sure where to even start with your post. First, I have to wonder if you even like yourself or if you have merely worked hard to construct your likes to appear "sophisticated", "eccentric", or "cool". I wonder where you draw the line between alleged music hobbyists and casual listeners. Are casual listeners people who listen to Top 40 radio or a band that is hugely popular, like the Dave Matthews Band? What makes you so much better than a person who likes music that is popular amongst others? People like what they like; it does not make them bad people. It seems you have a spent a lot of time listening to music; good for you. People who may not listen to these bands likely have other interests, such as athletics, or automobiles, or fashion, etc.; they would likely find YOU and your music obsession uninteresting. It works both ways. Just because someone don't like obscure music does not make them any less interesting, or any more interesting.

I don't think he was putting down casual listeners at all, and I don't think he would disagree with your assertion that they are not bad people, that they likely have other interests, etc. However, that doesn't rule out the legitimacy of his experience or the likelihood that other people may find themselves in the same boat.

Quote
I also don't see how you think you are better at listening to music than the "casual listener" because you have to listen to albums and bands you hate at first multiple times before you like them. Repetition breeds content. The more you listen to crap, the more you will like it (not to necessarily say that you listen to crap, but who knows). This is evident with many of the songs on the Top 40 radio station. Many are not good, yet if you hear them every hour, eventually you may find them sticking in your head (at least until the next "new" sound comes around).

He didn't say it was just repetition. Yes, he referred to the process as requiring a period of time, but I think -- and I don't know if this is indeed what he meant, but in any case it's what I believe -- that the key ingredient is intentionality. Repetition will make things stick in your head, but you might not like it. I get Top 40 songs stuck in my head because sometimes that's all I get to listen to when I'm at work, but that hasn't helped me enjoy that kind of music more.

On the other hand, I can imagine listening to these songs in the future if I want to be reminded of this time in my life.

So, your earlier question was probably rhetorical, but I'm going to give my answer anyway:

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Are casual listeners people who listen to Top 40 radio or a band that is hugely popular, like the Dave Matthews Band?

Ultimately I don't think it's what a person listens to, but how. I had a friend who listens to bands that I see talked about here relatively frequently (my vagueness betrays my ignorance), but she generally just has her music playing on shuffle in the background. I could be wrong, because obviously I don't see what she's doing all the time, but my impression based on how she listens to music when I see her and the way she talks about the music she listens to is that she's a 'casual listener,' someone who just kinda likes the mood it sets when it's playing in the background of whatever she's doing. In other words, she's not really paying attention. And that's fine!
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tommydski

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #37 on: 17 Jan 2010, 09:58 »

I am not sure where to even start with your post. First, I have to wonder if you even like yourself or if you have merely worked hard to construct your likes to appear "sophisticated", "eccentric", or "cool". I wonder where you draw the line between alleged music hobbyists and casual listeners. Are casual listeners people who listen to Top 40 radio or a band that is hugely popular, like the Dave Matthews Band? What makes you so much better than a person who likes music that is popular amongst others? People like what they like; it does not make them bad people. It seems you have a spent a lot of time listening to music; good for you. People who may not listen to these bands likely have other interests, such as athletics, or automobiles, or fashion, etc.; they would likely find YOU and your music obsession uninteresting. It works both ways. Just because someone don't like obscure music does not make them any less interesting, or any more interesting.

I also don't see how you think you are better at listening to music than the "casual listener" because you have to listen to albums and bands you hate at first multiple times before you like them. Repetition breeds content. The more you listen to crap, the more you will like it (not to necessarily say that you listen to crap, but who knows). This is evident with many of the songs on the Top 40 radio station. Many are not good, yet if you hear them every hour, eventually you may find them sticking in your head (at least until the next "new" sound comes around).

I would respond to each sentence here but with respect it's effectively a straw man. I didn't say any of the above and actually explicitly countered most of the above if you read my whole post. To point out the most important parts just for reference -

Quote from: tommydski
This pretty much undermines my entire belief about music and is probably where the line between music hobbyist and casual listener is drawn. No camp is better than the other and I understand both but obviously I tend to personally relate better to the former than the latter.

Quote from: tommydski
I can be friends with casual listeners but overwhelmingly I find those who I form a lasting bond with are music hobbyists. It's a matter of personal preference obviously.

I have no problem at all with casual listeners. An overwhelming majority of people I know and like could be described as such. However, since I don't really get to talk about music during the course of my real life, I enjoy using this and other music forums to discuss my own music exploration. In your original post you made an assertion which I countered purely because I disagreed and found it relevant to this subject matter, being about whether you can get into music you don't immediately like. My stance was you can, I have and so have other people. Possibly you should just re-read my original post from a neutral perspective, it isn't remotely controversial. I can't help but feel you created a straw man because you felt I was attacking you in some way. I wasn't, I just used something you said as a jump off point for my post. Nothing personal, I would have done exactly the same if anyone had said the same thing.

BUT you should go in with an open mind.

I agree with this bit. Part of having an open mind is giving something a chance.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #38 on: 17 Jan 2010, 11:26 »

Are casual listeners people who listen to Top 40 radio or a band that is hugely popular, like the Dave Matthews Band? What makes you so much better than a person who likes music that is popular amongst others? People like what they like; it does not make them bad people. It seems you have a spent a lot of time listening to music; good for you. People who may not listen to these bands likely have other interests, such as athletics, or automobiles, or fashion, etc.; they would likely find YOU and your music obsession uninteresting. It works both ways. Just because someone don't like obscure music does not make them any less interesting, or any more interesting.

plenty of people listen to "obscure" bands casually.  plenty of "music hobbyists" only listen to mainstream rock and pop.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #39 on: 17 Jan 2010, 17:21 »


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2wud_RqEaM

I don't remember this song but I kind of like it.

Also, Syd Barrett looks like he belongs in Green Day.


Also also, I must say that tricia kidd is right, here.
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David_Dovey

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #40 on: 17 Jan 2010, 18:34 »

Um, fuck it.

Yes, a "music hobbyist" might not be intrinsically better as a person than a "casual listener", but if I wanted to find something out about music or cop a recommendation, I know who I'd be going to.

It's like, who am I going to ask for a detailed analysis of the root causes of World War II, someone who has spent a lot of time thinking, researching and analysing the conflict, or a dude who saw Inglorious Basterds twice?
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #41 on: 17 Jan 2010, 19:30 »

Well, there's a certain amount of truth to that but of course, you could then argue that in fact you could be asking somebody who is actually a trained musician (certainly not me) over somebody who just has lots of ridiculous music trivia stored away (basically me).

Also, different people know about different types of music. I know pretty much exclusively about rock and yet not at all about metal for example. For good advice on metal you'd speak to KharBevNor, a different kind of music hobbyist.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #42 on: 18 Jan 2010, 00:22 »

Where do I start with Coil?
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #43 on: 18 Jan 2010, 00:32 »

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #44 on: 18 Jan 2010, 04:26 »

Where to start with New Order?
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #45 on: 18 Jan 2010, 06:24 »

Do the chronological thing
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #46 on: 18 Jan 2010, 07:16 »

Where to start with New Order?

Substance.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #47 on: 18 Jan 2010, 08:46 »

I dunno, I think Singles gives a better overall career trajectory, you even get the few decent tunes from their latter-day era.

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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #48 on: 18 Jan 2010, 08:57 »

I prefer Substance, it has the better versions of most tracks.
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Re: Where to start?
« Reply #49 on: 18 Jan 2010, 12:13 »

i like early New Order but at the same time i feel like the only songs you really need to hear by them are "Temptation", "Blue Monday" and "Bizarre Love Triangle".
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